Skip to main content
Back to Top

Child care assistance for families involved in the child welfare system: Predicting child care subsidy use and stability

Date Added to Library: 
Friday, February 28, 2014 - 14:45
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 
10.1016/j.childyouth.2012.09.015
Priority: 
normal
Individual Author: 
Lipscomb, Shannon T.
Lewis, Kendra M.
Masyn, Katherine E.
Meloy, Mary Elizabeth
Reference Type: 
Publisher: 
Published Date: 
12/01/2012
Published Date (Date): 
Saturday, December 1, 2012
Publication: 
Children and Youth Services Review
Volume: 
34
Issue Number: 
12
Page Range: 
2454-2463
Year: 
2012
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

Early child care and education programs have the potential to play a supportive role in the lives of vulnerable children and families involved in the child welfare system. Child care subsidies can help low-income families to access these programs. The current study examines the use and stability of child care subsidies among children from families involved in the child welfare system. Administrative data were obtained from the Oregon Department of Human Services through two linked datasets: Child Welfare Services and Employment Related Day Care (Oregon's child care subsidy program). Results indicate that children placed out of their biological homes through child welfare services, and those with more instability in child welfare placements, are less likely to receive subsidized child care than those protected in their homes. Findings further suggest that children involved in child welfare services have even less stability in child care subsidy use than other children from low-income families, evidenced by shorter durations of subsidy use. These findings provide a platform for future research in this area, and have implications for the well-being of children and families involved in child welfare services, whose lives involve a host of challenges, risks, and instabilities. (author abstract)

Target Populations: 
Geographic Focus: 
Page Count: 
10
Share/Save

The SSRC is here to help you! Do you need more information on this record?

If you are unable to access the full-text of the article from the Public URL provided, please email our Librarians for assistance at ssrc@opressrc.org.

In addition to the information on this record provided by the SSRC, you may be able to use the following options to find an electronic copy from an online subscription service or your local library:

  • Worldcat to find an electronic copy from an online subscription service
  • Google Scholar to discover other full text options