Skip to main content
Back to Top

Opioids and the labor market

Date Added to Library: 
Tuesday, March 12, 2019 - 10:53
Priority: 
normal
Individual Author: 
Aliprantis, Dionissi
Fee, Kyle
Schweitzer, Mark E.
Reference Type: 
Place Published: 
Cleveland, OH
Published Date: 
03/01/2019
Published Date (Date): 
Friday, March 1, 2019
Publication: 
Working Paper
Volume: 
18
Issue Number: 
07R
Page Range: 
1-40
Year: 
2019
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

This paper studies the relationship between local opioid prescription rates and labor market outcomes. We improve the joint measurement of labor market outcomes and prescription rates in the rural areas where nearly 30 percent of the US population lives. We find that increasing the local prescription rate by 10 percent decreases the prime-age employment rate by 0.50 percentage points for men and 0.17 percentage points for women. This effect is larger for white men with less than a BA (0.70 percentage points) and largest for minority men with less than a BA (1.01 percentage points). Geography is an obstacle to giving a causal interpretation to these results, especially since they were estimated in the midst of a large recession and recovery that generated considerable cross-sectional variation in local economic performance. We show that our results are not sensitive to most approaches to controlling for places experiencing either contemporaneous labor market shocks or persistently weak labor market conditions. We also present evidence on reverse causality, finding that a short-term unemployment shock did not increase the share of people abusing prescription opioids. Our estimates imply that prescription opioids can account for 44 percent of the realized national decrease in men’s labor force participation between 2001 and 2015. (Author abstract)

Geographic Focus: 
Page Count: 
40
Topical Area: 
Topical Area: 
Keyword: 
Share/Save

The SSRC is here to help you! Do you need more information on this record?

If you are unable to access the full-text of the article from the Public URL provided, please email our Librarians for assistance at ssrc@opressrc.org.

In addition to the information on this record provided by the SSRC, you may be able to use the following options to find an electronic copy from an online subscription service or your local library:

  • Worldcat to find an electronic copy from an online subscription service
  • Google Scholar to discover other full text options