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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Maxwell, Kelly; Starr, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Licensing is traditionally viewed as providing the foundation (or the floor) of quality in early care and education (ECE) settings. States and territories are responsible for licensing child care programs, and a license serves as permission to legally operate a child care program. The essential purpose of licensing is to provide basic protections to prevent harm to children. Initiatives like Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) often build on the basic requirements of licensing to define quality and support programs in achieving higher levels of quality. This conceptualization of licensing as a basic, first step toward quality has begun to change recently. Licensing is increasingly viewed as integral all along the quality continuum, not just as the floor of quality. Further, some ECE policymakers are considering how all aspects of the licensing system—from the standards to monitoring compliance to enforcement—can support the quality of ECE. Although the conceptual relationship between licensing and quality is evolving, there is little research about how licensing...

    Licensing is traditionally viewed as providing the foundation (or the floor) of quality in early care and education (ECE) settings. States and territories are responsible for licensing child care programs, and a license serves as permission to legally operate a child care program. The essential purpose of licensing is to provide basic protections to prevent harm to children. Initiatives like Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) often build on the basic requirements of licensing to define quality and support programs in achieving higher levels of quality. This conceptualization of licensing as a basic, first step toward quality has begun to change recently. Licensing is increasingly viewed as integral all along the quality continuum, not just as the floor of quality. Further, some ECE policymakers are considering how all aspects of the licensing system—from the standards to monitoring compliance to enforcement—can support the quality of ECE. Although the conceptual relationship between licensing and quality is evolving, there is little research about how licensing influences quality. This brief provides a framework to support discussion and research in this important area. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Melissa ; Spiker, Katie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Apprenticeship and other forms of work-based learning are important tools for helping workers acquire skills employers need. To reach the most workers and businesses, more work needs to be done to diversify the apprenticeship pipeline to include more women, low-wage workers, and parents of young children.

    Underrepresented workers without adequate industry experience often need pre-employment or pre-apprenticeship training before they reach the skill level necessary to enter work-based learning programs. But, training alone may not be sufficient to ensure success. Pre-apprenticeship programs that provide both training and access to child care can offer an important on-ramp to an apprenticeship pathway for a broad range of workers. Once in an apprenticeship, child care continues to be an important support for ensuring participant success since starting wages are lower than those apprentices can expect to make once they’ve completed their program.

    This brief discusses the significant roles affordable child care and pre-work-based learning training like pre-...

    Apprenticeship and other forms of work-based learning are important tools for helping workers acquire skills employers need. To reach the most workers and businesses, more work needs to be done to diversify the apprenticeship pipeline to include more women, low-wage workers, and parents of young children.

    Underrepresented workers without adequate industry experience often need pre-employment or pre-apprenticeship training before they reach the skill level necessary to enter work-based learning programs. But, training alone may not be sufficient to ensure success. Pre-apprenticeship programs that provide both training and access to child care can offer an important on-ramp to an apprenticeship pathway for a broad range of workers. Once in an apprenticeship, child care continues to be an important support for ensuring participant success since starting wages are lower than those apprentices can expect to make once they’ve completed their program.

    This brief discusses the significant roles affordable child care and pre-work-based learning training like pre-apprenticeship have in expanding access to and success in work-based learning programs. The report highlights the best practices for offering child care during and after pre-apprenticeship programs from Moore Community House’s Mississippi Women in Construction program and offers federal and state policy recommendations to make these supports available to more workers across the country. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Chocolaad, Yvette; Wandner, Stephen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The National Association of State Workforce Agencies conducted a nationwide assessment to understand current research and evaluation capacity within state workforce agencies (SWAs). This report summarizes the responses and findings from forty-one states; identifies technical assistance and capacity needs by research skill area, and catalogues recent research publications produced by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The feedback gathered from the first set of questions gauges the interest or demand by SWAs, governors, and legislatures for the types of research and evaluations that can be produced; and the types of state and/or outside researcher partnerships related to funding, conducting, or participating in research and evaluation projects. The second set of questions focus on understanding the current SWA staff capacity (levels, experiences, and skills) to conduct research and evaluation; types and levels of funding; kinds of research and evaluation studies produced with or without partners from calendar years (CY) 2011 to 2015; and plans to initiate new studies or evaluations...

    The National Association of State Workforce Agencies conducted a nationwide assessment to understand current research and evaluation capacity within state workforce agencies (SWAs). This report summarizes the responses and findings from forty-one states; identifies technical assistance and capacity needs by research skill area, and catalogues recent research publications produced by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The feedback gathered from the first set of questions gauges the interest or demand by SWAs, governors, and legislatures for the types of research and evaluations that can be produced; and the types of state and/or outside researcher partnerships related to funding, conducting, or participating in research and evaluation projects. The second set of questions focus on understanding the current SWA staff capacity (levels, experiences, and skills) to conduct research and evaluation; types and levels of funding; kinds of research and evaluation studies produced with or without partners from calendar years (CY) 2011 to 2015; and plans to initiate new studies or evaluations with or without outside contractor or partner support during calendar years 2016 through 2018. The third set of questions asked the states to identify individual studies and evaluations, including the authors and partners, research methods used, data sets accessed, central research question addressed, and approximate cost of the study.

    A second part of the report features case studies of two states: Washington and Ohio, that have developed significant capacity in the area of research and evaluation. Both states provided extensive background and historical information related to the evolution of their longitudinal administrative data systems to support research studies and evaluations; described the roles and functions of the different organizations within their respective states that conduct, coordinate, or support research and evaluation on workforce programs; explained how data sharing requests are processed and data is confidentially secured; and discussed specific studies, assessments, and surveys conducted on workforce programs. The states also shared additional information about computer systems and software, staffing, program and budget environments; and described relationships between research data centers, state workforce investment boards, research plans, and management use of evidence-based policy-formation supported by the research and evaluation entities in each state. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Porter, Kristin; Hendra, Richard; Balu, Rekha
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the use of predictive analytics to assess an individual’s risk of not reaching key self-sufficiency milestones, to target individuals based on their level of risk, and to refine human services based on the characteristics and behaviors of individuals within levels of risk.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the use of predictive analytics to assess an individual’s risk of not reaching key self-sufficiency milestones, to target individuals based on their level of risk, and to refine human services based on the characteristics and behaviors of individuals within levels of risk.

  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    In the fall of 2014, OPRE organized an Innovative Methods meeting to explore cutting-edge applications of methods and analytic techniques that can inform social program practice and policy. This brief summarizes the meeting and includes:

    • A description of the meeting topic
    • An overview of each panel
    • The meeting agenda
    • Information about other products that came out of the meeting.

    The brief considers methods and designs that move beyond questions about whether or not programs and policies work, but also address questions about which particular parts work, under what circumstances, and how. You will also find potential steps to advance research that unpacks the “black box” of policy and program effects.

    In the fall of 2014, OPRE organized an Innovative Methods meeting to explore cutting-edge applications of methods and analytic techniques that can inform social program practice and policy. This brief summarizes the meeting and includes:

    • A description of the meeting topic
    • An overview of each panel
    • The meeting agenda
    • Information about other products that came out of the meeting.

    The brief considers methods and designs that move beyond questions about whether or not programs and policies work, but also address questions about which particular parts work, under what circumstances, and how. You will also find potential steps to advance research that unpacks the “black box” of policy and program effects.

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