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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Schretzman, Maryanne; Hendra, Richard; Martens, Andy; Pecaut, Chris
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    While data analytics presents new opportunities to test programs for efficacy and efficiencies, they also highlight a need for improved datasets and underscore the importance of research-practitioner partnerships. This session presented experimental research findings from studies in New York City and the state of Illinois that have used new methodologies and unique data sets to link administrative data across agencies, and the value of using predictive analytics to forecast future social outcomes. This panel, moderated by Maryanne Schretzman (NYC Center for Innovation through Data Intelligence), also discussed issues involved in linking administrative data. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    While data analytics presents new opportunities to test programs for efficacy and efficiencies, they also highlight a need for improved datasets and underscore the importance of research-practitioner partnerships. This session presented experimental research findings from studies in New York City and the state of Illinois that have used new methodologies and unique data sets to link administrative data across agencies, and the value of using predictive analytics to forecast future social outcomes. This panel, moderated by Maryanne Schretzman (NYC Center for Innovation through Data Intelligence), also discussed issues involved in linking administrative data. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Deterding, Nicole; Moore, Kathleen; Elkin, Sam; Patton, Deleena
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Individuals and families in need often access services from a number of programs and providers. While the field is shifting toward a more holistic approach to service delivery, the technologies used to manage data often lags behind. This session, moderated by Kathleen Moore (Administration for Children and Families/Institute for Research on Poverty), explored the value of integrated data systems to improve service delivery and program outcomes and discuss examples of states engaged in such efforts. Nicole Deterding (Administration for Children and Families/Business Strategy Consultants) served as a discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Individuals and families in need often access services from a number of programs and providers. While the field is shifting toward a more holistic approach to service delivery, the technologies used to manage data often lags behind. This session, moderated by Kathleen Moore (Administration for Children and Families/Institute for Research on Poverty), explored the value of integrated data systems to improve service delivery and program outcomes and discuss examples of states engaged in such efforts. Nicole Deterding (Administration for Children and Families/Business Strategy Consultants) served as a discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Blocklin, Michelle; Alvira-Hammond, Marta; Hendra, Richard; Kleinman, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). This session looked at the relationship between job characteristics and well-being. The presentations described variations in the employment characteristic of low-income families across racial and ethnic groups, findings from a literature review on the relationship between the psychosocial conditions of work and health or well-being, and potential impacts of employment on health and well-being in a context in which individuals were randomly assigned to work or non-work. Michelle Blocklin (Abt Associates) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). This session looked at the relationship between job characteristics and well-being. The presentations described variations in the employment characteristic of low-income families across racial and ethnic groups, findings from a literature review on the relationship between the psychosocial conditions of work and health or well-being, and potential impacts of employment on health and well-being in a context in which individuals were randomly assigned to work or non-work. Michelle Blocklin (Abt Associates) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Allard, Scott W.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). How has the spatial distribution of poverty shifted in America since 1990? How has the antipoverty safety net responded to changes in the geography of poverty? Drawing on findings from his book, Places in Need: The Changing Geography of Poverty in America, Scott W. Allard (University of Washington) described spatial trends in poverty across America, discussed which safety net programs have been most and least responsive to the geographic shifts in poverty, and reflected on implications for state and local policy and practice. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

     

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). How has the spatial distribution of poverty shifted in America since 1990? How has the antipoverty safety net responded to changes in the geography of poverty? Drawing on findings from his book, Places in Need: The Changing Geography of Poverty in America, Scott W. Allard (University of Washington) described spatial trends in poverty across America, discussed which safety net programs have been most and least responsive to the geographic shifts in poverty, and reflected on implications for state and local policy and practice. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Clum, Kim; McDaniel, Marla; Pharris-Ciurej, Nikolas; Timmerman, Larry; Winston, Pamela
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

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