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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Brown, Elizabeth; Conroy, Kara; Kirby, Gretchen G.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Individuals and families frequently qualify for multiple human services and employment programs that are funded, regulated, and administered by different federal agencies—each with their own eligibility criteria, program requirements, and performance indicators. Although these programs often share similar goals, they differ in the populations served, the services provided, and the implementation of performance measures. The performance measures component of the EMPOWERED study explores how aligned performance measurement might achieve accountability across programs that share similar goals and maximize efficiencies in program management and service coordination.

    This issue brief provides local perspec­tives on challenges and opportunities for aligning performance indicators across a variety of federal programs promoting self-sufficiency. The brief is informed by three in-depth case studies that included discussions with a range of administrators, supervisors, and frontline staff across select programs in the three localities. (Author abstract)

    Individuals and families frequently qualify for multiple human services and employment programs that are funded, regulated, and administered by different federal agencies—each with their own eligibility criteria, program requirements, and performance indicators. Although these programs often share similar goals, they differ in the populations served, the services provided, and the implementation of performance measures. The performance measures component of the EMPOWERED study explores how aligned performance measurement might achieve accountability across programs that share similar goals and maximize efficiencies in program management and service coordination.

    This issue brief provides local perspec­tives on challenges and opportunities for aligning performance indicators across a variety of federal programs promoting self-sufficiency. The brief is informed by three in-depth case studies that included discussions with a range of administrators, supervisors, and frontline staff across select programs in the three localities. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Oliveira, Victor; Prell, Mark; Tiehen, Laura; Smallwood, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The major policy and economic changes that have shaped the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program's history are reviewed, as well as the factors influencing these changes and their implications. Six major issues that currently face the program are explored. (Author introduction)

    The major policy and economic changes that have shaped the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program's history are reviewed, as well as the factors influencing these changes and their implications. Six major issues that currently face the program are explored. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Codd, Nick
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Farrigan, Tracey
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    The share of children living in poverty in the U.S. remains higher than it was before the Great Recession. According to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS), nearly 20 percent of children were living in poverty in 2016, compared with 18 percent in 2007. Also, the number of children in poverty increased over this period by 1 million, from 13,097,100 to 14,115,713. Child poverty rates continue to be highest in the South and Southwest, particularly in counties with cocentrations of Native Americans along the Mississippi Delta. Children in poverty tend to live in rural (nonmetro) counties- many with persistantly high poverty- that were hard hit by the recession. (Author introduction)

    The share of children living in poverty in the U.S. remains higher than it was before the Great Recession. According to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS), nearly 20 percent of children were living in poverty in 2016, compared with 18 percent in 2007. Also, the number of children in poverty increased over this period by 1 million, from 13,097,100 to 14,115,713. Child poverty rates continue to be highest in the South and Southwest, particularly in counties with cocentrations of Native Americans along the Mississippi Delta. Children in poverty tend to live in rural (nonmetro) counties- many with persistantly high poverty- that were hard hit by the recession. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine; Pashi, Arthur; Morales, Melody
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report uses the latest data available from the U.S. Census Bureau to describe custodial families served by the IV-D program, a federally mandated program that promotes parental responsibility and family self-sufficiency by providing families with child support services. (Excerpt from author summary)

    This report uses the latest data available from the U.S. Census Bureau to describe custodial families served by the IV-D program, a federally mandated program that promotes parental responsibility and family self-sufficiency by providing families with child support services. (Excerpt from author summary)

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