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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Institute for Research on Poverty
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officially declared an opioid epidemic in 2011, and the problem has continued to grow; President Trump declared it a public health emergency in October 2017. Between 2000 and 2015, more than half a million people died from opioid overdose, half of which were from prescription (as opposed to illicit) drugs. In 2016, opioid overdose killed 91 Americans every day, more than 64,000 people by year’s end—almost double the deaths in 2015. Deaths from fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is similar to morphine but 50 to 100 times more powerful, rose 540 percent in three years. In addition to rising overdose deaths among opioid users, the number of babies born with symptoms of opiate withdrawal due to maternal opioid use during pregnancy also continues to climb. Although substance abuse and addiction are complex social problems experienced by people from all walks of life, several studies suggest that opioid abuse and socioeconomic disadvantage are often intertwined. This brief draws the contours of the crisis, explores associations of low...

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officially declared an opioid epidemic in 2011, and the problem has continued to grow; President Trump declared it a public health emergency in October 2017. Between 2000 and 2015, more than half a million people died from opioid overdose, half of which were from prescription (as opposed to illicit) drugs. In 2016, opioid overdose killed 91 Americans every day, more than 64,000 people by year’s end—almost double the deaths in 2015. Deaths from fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is similar to morphine but 50 to 100 times more powerful, rose 540 percent in three years. In addition to rising overdose deaths among opioid users, the number of babies born with symptoms of opiate withdrawal due to maternal opioid use during pregnancy also continues to climb. Although substance abuse and addiction are complex social problems experienced by people from all walks of life, several studies suggest that opioid abuse and socioeconomic disadvantage are often intertwined. This brief draws the contours of the crisis, explores associations of low education and income with opioid misuse, and identifies some research gaps. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Singh, Gopal K. ; Kogan, Michael D. ; Slifkin, Rebecca T.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Appalachia—a region that stretches from Mississippi to New York—has historically been recognized as a socially and economically disadvantaged part of the United States, and growing evidence suggests that health disparities between it and the rest of the country are widening. We compared infant mortality and life expectancy disparities in Appalachia to those outside the region during the period 1990–2013. We found that infant mortality disparities widened for both whites and blacks, with infant mortality 16 percent higher in Appalachia in 2009–13, and the region’s deficit in life expectancy increased from 0.6 years in 1990–92 to 2.4 years in 2009–13. The association between area poverty and life expectancy was stronger in Appalachia than in the rest of the United States. We found wide health disparities, including a thirteen-year gap in life expectancy among black men in high-poverty areas of Appalachia, compared to white women in low-poverty areas elsewhere. Higher mortality in Appalachia from cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases or chronic...

    Appalachia—a region that stretches from Mississippi to New York—has historically been recognized as a socially and economically disadvantaged part of the United States, and growing evidence suggests that health disparities between it and the rest of the country are widening. We compared infant mortality and life expectancy disparities in Appalachia to those outside the region during the period 1990–2013. We found that infant mortality disparities widened for both whites and blacks, with infant mortality 16 percent higher in Appalachia in 2009–13, and the region’s deficit in life expectancy increased from 0.6 years in 1990–92 to 2.4 years in 2009–13. The association between area poverty and life expectancy was stronger in Appalachia than in the rest of the United States. We found wide health disparities, including a thirteen-year gap in life expectancy among black men in high-poverty areas of Appalachia, compared to white women in low-poverty areas elsewhere. Higher mortality in Appalachia from cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, nephritis or kidney diseases, suicide, unintentional injuries, and drug overdose contributed to lower life expectancy in the region, compared to the rest of the country. Widening health disparities were also due to slower mortality improvements in Appalachia. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brockie, Teresa N.; Dana-Sacco, Gail; Wallen, Gwenyth R.; Wilcox, Holly C.; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with numerous risk behaviors and mental health outcomes among youth. This study examines the relationship between the number of types of exposures to ACEs and risk behaviors and mental health outcomes among reservation-based Native Americans. In 2011, data were collected from Native American (N = 288; 15-24 years of age) tribal members from a remote plains reservation using an anonymous web-based questionnaire. We analyzed the relationship between six ACEs, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, physical and emotional neglect, witness to intimate partner violence, for those <18 years, and included historical loss associated symptoms, and perceived discrimination for those <19 years; and four risk behavior/mental health outcomes: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depression symptoms, poly-drug use, and suicide attempt. Seventy-eight percent of the sample reported at least one ACE and 40% reported at least two. The cumulative impact of the ACEs were significant (p < .001) for the four outcomes with...

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with numerous risk behaviors and mental health outcomes among youth. This study examines the relationship between the number of types of exposures to ACEs and risk behaviors and mental health outcomes among reservation-based Native Americans. In 2011, data were collected from Native American (N = 288; 15-24 years of age) tribal members from a remote plains reservation using an anonymous web-based questionnaire. We analyzed the relationship between six ACEs, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, physical and emotional neglect, witness to intimate partner violence, for those <18 years, and included historical loss associated symptoms, and perceived discrimination for those <19 years; and four risk behavior/mental health outcomes: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depression symptoms, poly-drug use, and suicide attempt. Seventy-eight percent of the sample reported at least one ACE and 40% reported at least two. The cumulative impact of the ACEs were significant (p < .001) for the four outcomes with each additional ACE increasing the odds of suicide attempt (37%), poly-drug use (51%), PTSD symptoms (55%), and depression symptoms (57%). To address these findings culturally appropriate childhood and adolescent interventions for reservation-based populations must be developed, tested and evaluated longitudinally. (Author abstract)

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