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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Rademacher, Ida; Brooks, Jennifer; Wiedrich, Kasey; Melford, Genevieve; Nguyen, Michelle; Rosen, Barbara; Campbell, Chris; Lawton, Kristin; Radovich, Amy; Murrell, Karen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Local leaders are pioneering new ways to leverage the resources and regulatory power of municipalities to work across departmental silos and public/private sector divides to scale up economic inclusion and asset-building opportunities for low- and moderate-income families. Municipal governments are uniquely poised to implement innovative and effective programs, create powerful partnerships and deliver forward-thinking services to the communities they serve every day.

    CFED worked closely with members of the Cities for Financial Empowerment Coalition to understand these emerging efforts, and the resulting report, Building Economic Security in America’s Cities: New Municipal Strategies for Asset Building and Financial Empowerment, highlights the work cities across the country are doing to educate, empower and protect residents in the financial marketplace. This report represents a comprehensive effort to document the range of municipal policies and programs that are being used to enhance the financial security of low-income families during a time of deep recession. (author...

    Local leaders are pioneering new ways to leverage the resources and regulatory power of municipalities to work across departmental silos and public/private sector divides to scale up economic inclusion and asset-building opportunities for low- and moderate-income families. Municipal governments are uniquely poised to implement innovative and effective programs, create powerful partnerships and deliver forward-thinking services to the communities they serve every day.

    CFED worked closely with members of the Cities for Financial Empowerment Coalition to understand these emerging efforts, and the resulting report, Building Economic Security in America’s Cities: New Municipal Strategies for Asset Building and Financial Empowerment, highlights the work cities across the country are doing to educate, empower and protect residents in the financial marketplace. This report represents a comprehensive effort to document the range of municipal policies and programs that are being used to enhance the financial security of low-income families during a time of deep recession. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sallis, James F. ; Slymen, Donald J.; Conway, Terry L.; Frank, Lawrence D.; Saelens, Brian E.; Cain, Kelli; Chapman, James E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    The present study explored whether perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with physical activity differ by neighborhood income. Adults aged 20-65 years (n=2199; 48% female; mean age=45 years; 26% ethnic minority) were recruited from 32 neighborhoods from the Seattle, WA and Baltimore, MD regions that varied in objectively measured walkability and neighborhood income. Perceived built and social environment variables were assessed with the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. There were neighborhood income disparities on 10 of 15 variables. Residents from high-income neighborhoods reported more favorable esthetics, pedestrian/biking facilities, safety from traffic, safety from crime, and access to recreation facilities than residents of low-income areas (all p's <0.001). Low-income neighborhoods may lack amenities and safety attributes that can facilitate high levels of physical activity for both transportation and recreation purposes. (Author abstract)

    The present study explored whether perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with physical activity differ by neighborhood income. Adults aged 20-65 years (n=2199; 48% female; mean age=45 years; 26% ethnic minority) were recruited from 32 neighborhoods from the Seattle, WA and Baltimore, MD regions that varied in objectively measured walkability and neighborhood income. Perceived built and social environment variables were assessed with the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. There were neighborhood income disparities on 10 of 15 variables. Residents from high-income neighborhoods reported more favorable esthetics, pedestrian/biking facilities, safety from traffic, safety from crime, and access to recreation facilities than residents of low-income areas (all p's <0.001). Low-income neighborhoods may lack amenities and safety attributes that can facilitate high levels of physical activity for both transportation and recreation purposes. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hendey, Leah; Kingsley, G. Thomas
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    This report reviews recent trends for social and economic conditions in the 10 metropolitan areas that form the context for the neighborhood programs being implemented as a part of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Making Connections (MC) initiative. It finds that the sites are strikingly diverse along many dimensions and in are many ways representative of the diversity in conditions and trends across America’s metropolitan areas. In almost all cases, these areas’ economies followed the pattern of the nation over the past decade—booming in the late 1990s, declining over the first two years of this decade, and then partially recovering through 2007. But there were stark contrasts. Since 2002, for example, two MC metros attained among the nation’s highest rates of employment growth (Denver and Seattle) while two others experienced serious declines (Oakland and Milwaukee). Although there were important differences in magnitudes, all sites shared in a number of trends: minority groups growing as a share of total population and improvements in several social indicators (e.g., in crime...

    This report reviews recent trends for social and economic conditions in the 10 metropolitan areas that form the context for the neighborhood programs being implemented as a part of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Making Connections (MC) initiative. It finds that the sites are strikingly diverse along many dimensions and in are many ways representative of the diversity in conditions and trends across America’s metropolitan areas. In almost all cases, these areas’ economies followed the pattern of the nation over the past decade—booming in the late 1990s, declining over the first two years of this decade, and then partially recovering through 2007. But there were stark contrasts. Since 2002, for example, two MC metros attained among the nation’s highest rates of employment growth (Denver and Seattle) while two others experienced serious declines (Oakland and Milwaukee). Although there were important differences in magnitudes, all sites shared in a number of trends: minority groups growing as a share of total population and improvements in several social indicators (e.g., in crime and teen pregnancy) but, disturbingly, notable increases in child poverty. Through 2006, all 10 metros had also witnessed major increases in housing prices but again, differences were marked. Ratios of home prices to income were very high by U.S. standards in Oakland, Seattle, Denver, and Providence but below average in the other six sites. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hawkins, J. David; Kosterman, Rick; Catalano, Richard F.; Hill, Karl G.; Abbott, Robert D.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    Objective  To examine the long-term effects of a universal intervention in elementary schools in promoting positive functioning in school, work, and community, and preventing mental health problems, risky sexual behavior, substance misuse, and crime at ages 24 and 27 years.

    Design  Nonrandomized controlled trial.

    Setting  Fifteen public elementary schools serving diverse neighborhoods including high-crime neighborhoods in Seattle, Washington.

    Participants  Sex-balanced and multiracial/multiethnic sample of 598 participants at ages 24 and 27 years (93% of the original sample in these conditions).

    Interventions  Teacher training in classroom instruction and management, child social and emotional skill development, and parent workshops.

    Main Outcome Measures  Self-reports of functioning in school, work, and community and of mental health, sexual behavior, substance use, and crime, and court records.

    Results  A significant...

    Objective  To examine the long-term effects of a universal intervention in elementary schools in promoting positive functioning in school, work, and community, and preventing mental health problems, risky sexual behavior, substance misuse, and crime at ages 24 and 27 years.

    Design  Nonrandomized controlled trial.

    Setting  Fifteen public elementary schools serving diverse neighborhoods including high-crime neighborhoods in Seattle, Washington.

    Participants  Sex-balanced and multiracial/multiethnic sample of 598 participants at ages 24 and 27 years (93% of the original sample in these conditions).

    Interventions  Teacher training in classroom instruction and management, child social and emotional skill development, and parent workshops.

    Main Outcome Measures  Self-reports of functioning in school, work, and community and of mental health, sexual behavior, substance use, and crime, and court records.

    Results  A significant multivariate intervention effect across all 16 primary outcome indices was found. Specific effects included significantly better educational and economic attainment, mental health, and sexual health by age 27 years (all P < .05). Hypothesized effects on substance use and crime were not found at ages 24 or 27 years.

    Conclusions  A universal intervention for urban elementary schoolchildren, which focused on classroom management and instruction, children's social competence, and parenting practices, positively affected mental health, sexual health, and educational and economic achievement 15 years after the intervention ended. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fischer, David Jason
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2005

    In the 21st century, local economies won’t stand or fall on the presence of sports stadiums and office parks; they’ll be built on competitive workforce systems. But that work of construction is far more difficult than it sounds. To do it right, workforce systems must balance the oft-competing needs of workers and businesses; leverage millions in new dollars to pay for increased training programs; and link diverse players including nonprofits, colleges, and business associations through common goals and interests.

    This is the role of workforce intermediaries, quasi-governmental entities that are quickly becoming indispensable players in 21st century workforce systems. The consensus behind the intermediary approach solidified in early 2003, when the 102nd American Assembly issued a report entitled “Achieving Worker Success and Business Prosperity: The New Role for Workforce Intermediaries.” In this report, we assess lessons learned from three key intermediaries funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. As regions across the U.S. work to develop their own intermediaries, the...

    In the 21st century, local economies won’t stand or fall on the presence of sports stadiums and office parks; they’ll be built on competitive workforce systems. But that work of construction is far more difficult than it sounds. To do it right, workforce systems must balance the oft-competing needs of workers and businesses; leverage millions in new dollars to pay for increased training programs; and link diverse players including nonprofits, colleges, and business associations through common goals and interests.

    This is the role of workforce intermediaries, quasi-governmental entities that are quickly becoming indispensable players in 21st century workforce systems. The consensus behind the intermediary approach solidified in early 2003, when the 102nd American Assembly issued a report entitled “Achieving Worker Success and Business Prosperity: The New Role for Workforce Intermediaries.” In this report, we assess lessons learned from three key intermediaries funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. As regions across the U.S. work to develop their own intermediaries, the Casey experience offers helpful insights into the importance of intermediaries and what qualities to look for in organizations that can serve in this role...

    In this report, we look at three very distinct intermediary organizations —The Reinvestment Fund, a social-purpose lender and financier of community and economic revitalization in Philadelphia; Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership, a labor/management partnership in Milwaukee; and the Seattle Jobs Initiative, an agency that began its operations within Seattle’s city government and later reconstituted itself as an independent nonprofit — that share both common organizational traits and operational goals. Despite the very significant differences among the three sites in regional economic and local political support, we found that the successful workforce intermediaries profiled here shared several organizational strengths they could bring to bear as problems arose: proven credibility, access to leaders and key stakeholders in government and business, and a willingness to embrace pragmatism over ideology and make changes to programs and approaches as events dictate. Strong leadership and an organizational willingness to take risks were also key elements in their successes. (author introduction)

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