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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Turney, Kristin; Wildeman, Christopher
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Incarceration intensely alters the family lives of incarcerated men and the women and children connected to them. Yet women increasingly spend time behind bars and, accordingly, they absorb direct consequences of incarceration in addition to the more commonly considered spillover consequences of men’s incarceration on families. In this article, we draw on the stress process perspective to examine the consequences of maternal incarceration for three broad aspects of family life: romantic relationships, parenting, and economic wellbeing. Data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3,045), an urban sample that includes a relatively large number of mothers who spent time in jail or prison, and methodological strategies to account for spurious associations between maternal incarceration and family life, yield two important conclusions. First, maternal incarceration is a stressor that proliferates to engender chronic strains in family life. Second, many of these chronic strains are especially acute when maternal incarceration is accompanied by paternal incarceration....

    Incarceration intensely alters the family lives of incarcerated men and the women and children connected to them. Yet women increasingly spend time behind bars and, accordingly, they absorb direct consequences of incarceration in addition to the more commonly considered spillover consequences of men’s incarceration on families. In this article, we draw on the stress process perspective to examine the consequences of maternal incarceration for three broad aspects of family life: romantic relationships, parenting, and economic wellbeing. Data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3,045), an urban sample that includes a relatively large number of mothers who spent time in jail or prison, and methodological strategies to account for spurious associations between maternal incarceration and family life, yield two important conclusions. First, maternal incarceration is a stressor that proliferates to engender chronic strains in family life. Second, many of these chronic strains are especially acute when maternal incarceration is accompanied by paternal incarceration. Taken together, these findings suggest that the stressor of maternal incarceration has reverberating consequences for family life. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Turney, Kristen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Despite growing attention to the unintended consequences of paternal incarceration for children’s wellbeing across the life course, little is known about whether and how paternal incarceration is related to food insecurity among children, an especially acute and severe form of deprivation. In this article, I use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a cohort of children born to mostly unmarried mothers, to examine the relationship between paternal incarceration and three indicators of food insecurity among young children: current food insecurity (at age five), onset of food insecurity (between ages three and five), and exit from food insecurity (between ages three and five). Results from the most rigorous modeling strategy, propensity score matching models that further adjust for all covariates, indicate that recent paternal incarceration is associated with an increased risk of current food insecurity, an increased risk of onset into food insecurity, and a decreased risk of exit from food insecurity, but only among children living with fathers prior to his...

    Despite growing attention to the unintended consequences of paternal incarceration for children’s wellbeing across the life course, little is known about whether and how paternal incarceration is related to food insecurity among children, an especially acute and severe form of deprivation. In this article, I use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a cohort of children born to mostly unmarried mothers, to examine the relationship between paternal incarceration and three indicators of food insecurity among young children: current food insecurity (at age five), onset of food insecurity (between ages three and five), and exit from food insecurity (between ages three and five). Results from the most rigorous modeling strategy, propensity score matching models that further adjust for all covariates, indicate that recent paternal incarceration is associated with an increased risk of current food insecurity, an increased risk of onset into food insecurity, and a decreased risk of exit from food insecurity, but only among children living with fathers prior to his incarceration. Changes in the parental relationship, occurring after the onset of paternal incarceration, explain a moderate portion of these associations. Taken together, these findings highlight the salience of parental relationships in the association between paternal incarceration and children’s food insecurity and have a number of implications for policy. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: National Association of Counties; CSH
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    Supportive housing is an intervention that has been shown to have positive outcomes for frequent users of jails, shelters, hospitals and other (often county-funded) public systems and provides access to affordable housing coupled with individually tailored wrap-around services and supports. There are many benefits to be gained from initiating a supportive housing project for frequent users. Learn about the Frequent Users Systems Engagement (FUSE) model, how supportive housing concepts have been initiated in counties throughout the country and ways in which your county can get started. (Author abstract)

    Supportive housing is an intervention that has been shown to have positive outcomes for frequent users of jails, shelters, hospitals and other (often county-funded) public systems and provides access to affordable housing coupled with individually tailored wrap-around services and supports. There are many benefits to be gained from initiating a supportive housing project for frequent users. Learn about the Frequent Users Systems Engagement (FUSE) model, how supportive housing concepts have been initiated in counties throughout the country and ways in which your county can get started. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Turney, Kristin; Wildeman, Christopher
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    In response to dramatic increases in imprisonment, a burgeoning literature considers the consequences of incarceration for family life, almost always documenting negative consequences. But the effects of incarceration may be more complicated and nuanced and, in this paper, we consider the countervailing consequences of paternal incarceration for a host of family relationships, including fathers’ parenting, mothers’ parenting, and the relationship between parents. Using longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study and a rigorous research design, we find recent paternal incarceration sharply diminishes parenting behaviors among residential fathers but not among nonresidential fathers. Virtually all of the association between incarceration and parenting among residential fathers can be explained by changes in fathers’ relationships with their children’s mothers. The consequences for mothers’ parenting, however, are inconsistent and weak. Furthermore, our findings show recent paternal incarceration sharply increases the probability a mother will repartner,...

    In response to dramatic increases in imprisonment, a burgeoning literature considers the consequences of incarceration for family life, almost always documenting negative consequences. But the effects of incarceration may be more complicated and nuanced and, in this paper, we consider the countervailing consequences of paternal incarceration for a host of family relationships, including fathers’ parenting, mothers’ parenting, and the relationship between parents. Using longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study and a rigorous research design, we find recent paternal incarceration sharply diminishes parenting behaviors among residential fathers but not among nonresidential fathers. Virtually all of the association between incarceration and parenting among residential fathers can be explained by changes in fathers’ relationships with their children’s mothers. The consequences for mothers’ parenting, however, are inconsistent and weak. Furthermore, our findings show recent paternal incarceration sharply increases the probability a mother will repartner, potentially offsetting some losses in the involvement of the biological father while simultaneously leading to greater family complexity. Taken together, the collateral consequences of paternal incarceration for family life are complex and countervailing. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Corporation for Supportive Housing
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    CSH engaged several jurisdictions across the country to design and implement supportive housing initiatives that integrate the systems and resources of criminal justice, behavioral health, and housing agencies. The goal was to place people into supportive housing and end the cycle of homelessness and incarceration. CSH partnered with a number of leading researchers, including the Urban Institute, the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, the University of Minnesota and Columbia University to evaluate and measure the impact of these supportive housing interventions and document the systemic and programmatic lessons we have learned. (Author abstract)

    CSH engaged several jurisdictions across the country to design and implement supportive housing initiatives that integrate the systems and resources of criminal justice, behavioral health, and housing agencies. The goal was to place people into supportive housing and end the cycle of homelessness and incarceration. CSH partnered with a number of leading researchers, including the Urban Institute, the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, the University of Minnesota and Columbia University to evaluate and measure the impact of these supportive housing interventions and document the systemic and programmatic lessons we have learned. (Author abstract)

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