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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: O'Donnell, Julie; Kirkner, Sandra L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Low-income urban youth of color often face challenges in their transition to early adulthood. High school out-of-school time (OST) programs that promote positive youth development may help youth to better negotiate this period. However, little research exists on the long-term impact of such programs on young adults. The authors conducted a pilot qualitative study to explore the perspectives of young adults on the effect of their participation in the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) of Greater Long Beach Youth Institute. Respondents indicated that the program positively influenced their life choices and their ability to pursue higher education and enter the workforce. The findings suggest implications for other high school OST programs. (Author abstract)

    Low-income urban youth of color often face challenges in their transition to early adulthood. High school out-of-school time (OST) programs that promote positive youth development may help youth to better negotiate this period. However, little research exists on the long-term impact of such programs on young adults. The authors conducted a pilot qualitative study to explore the perspectives of young adults on the effect of their participation in the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) of Greater Long Beach Youth Institute. Respondents indicated that the program positively influenced their life choices and their ability to pursue higher education and enter the workforce. The findings suggest implications for other high school OST programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schaefer, Andrew; Mattingly, Marybeth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    In recent years, researchers have documented the changing demographics of rural areas, with a specific focus on changes in racial-ethnic composition and immigration patterns, particularly the increased migration of Hispanics to rural places. In spite of this attention to the changing demographics of rural America, surprisingly little is known about how rural immigrants compare to both their urban peers and native-born counterparts. In this brief we use American Community Survey (ACS) five-year estimates to document demographic and economic characteristics of the immigrant and native-born populations in the United States by metropolitan status. We focus on a wide range of demographic and economic indicators that relate to immigrants’ ability to assimilate and thrive in rural America. Our analysis finds that rural immigrants are different than their rural native-born and urban immigrant counterparts on a host of demographic characteristics, including age, education, and family structure. Rural immigrants also differ from urban immigrants with regard to when they arrived in the...

    In recent years, researchers have documented the changing demographics of rural areas, with a specific focus on changes in racial-ethnic composition and immigration patterns, particularly the increased migration of Hispanics to rural places. In spite of this attention to the changing demographics of rural America, surprisingly little is known about how rural immigrants compare to both their urban peers and native-born counterparts. In this brief we use American Community Survey (ACS) five-year estimates to document demographic and economic characteristics of the immigrant and native-born populations in the United States by metropolitan status. We focus on a wide range of demographic and economic indicators that relate to immigrants’ ability to assimilate and thrive in rural America. Our analysis finds that rural immigrants are different than their rural native-born and urban immigrant counterparts on a host of demographic characteristics, including age, education, and family structure. Rural immigrants also differ from urban immigrants with regard to when they arrived in the United States and where from. In terms of economic characteristics, rural immigrants have relatively low family income and high poverty rates, even among those currently working and those who work full time. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Alicia
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2016

    An estimated 2.8 million Americans between the ages of 16 and 24 are neither in school nor employed. In many big cities, up to one-fourth of all young adults can be characterized as “disconnected.” The problem is also severe in rural communities located in high-poverty areas, a pattern that is vividly illustrated by the disproportionate number of minority youth in the South who fall into this category.

    Mayors and city councilmembers are particularly well positioned to set the tone and direction for local efforts to reengage disconnected youth. By articulating key priorities and future directions for change, municipal leaders can provide a much-needed framework for discussions that involve the full range of city officials, community stakeholders, and local residents. (author abstract)

    An estimated 2.8 million Americans between the ages of 16 and 24 are neither in school nor employed. In many big cities, up to one-fourth of all young adults can be characterized as “disconnected.” The problem is also severe in rural communities located in high-poverty areas, a pattern that is vividly illustrated by the disproportionate number of minority youth in the South who fall into this category.

    Mayors and city councilmembers are particularly well positioned to set the tone and direction for local efforts to reengage disconnected youth. By articulating key priorities and future directions for change, municipal leaders can provide a much-needed framework for discussions that involve the full range of city officials, community stakeholders, and local residents. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Aceves, Aurelia De La Rosa ; Greenberg, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Low-income neighborhoods no longer experience the levels of community-wide disinvestment that they did through the 1990s, but their residents still face significant poverty, risk of displacement, and limited economic mobility. For this reason, Change Capital Fund (CCF), a New York City donor collaborative, formed to invest in sophisticated community organizations that implement data-driven strategies integrating housing, education, and employment services to fight poverty. While government agencies are often constrained in providing one type of assistance — such as income support — to those who seek services from them, CCF embraces a more comprehensive approach that has the potential to reach underserved community residents.

    This brief, the first of five by MDRC on CCF, gives an overview of the initiative and its goals, describes the grantees’ neighborhoods and their strategies to fight poverty, and highlights some of the early lessons from the initiative. Drawing on interviews, observations, programmatic data from each grantee, and outcomes data capturing the collective...

    Low-income neighborhoods no longer experience the levels of community-wide disinvestment that they did through the 1990s, but their residents still face significant poverty, risk of displacement, and limited economic mobility. For this reason, Change Capital Fund (CCF), a New York City donor collaborative, formed to invest in sophisticated community organizations that implement data-driven strategies integrating housing, education, and employment services to fight poverty. While government agencies are often constrained in providing one type of assistance — such as income support — to those who seek services from them, CCF embraces a more comprehensive approach that has the potential to reach underserved community residents.

    This brief, the first of five by MDRC on CCF, gives an overview of the initiative and its goals, describes the grantees’ neighborhoods and their strategies to fight poverty, and highlights some of the early lessons from the initiative. Drawing on interviews, observations, programmatic data from each grantee, and outcomes data capturing the collective efforts of all grantees during the first of four years of CCF funding, the brief illustrates how community organizations may be uniquely positioned to undertake economic opportunity initiatives, if they can both reach underserved populations and mobilize and coordinate high-quality services for them.

    The first year of CCF was a ramp-up year, with grantee efforts focused on building internal capacity and the appropriate infrastructure to put their respective interventions into place and scale them up over the next three years. These steps included hiring staff, adopting internal processes to make it easier to share knowledge, putting into practice new ways to coordinate service delivery, establishing data tracking systems, and defining outcomes to measure their work. CCF is a rare funding opportunity, providing financial support to grantees’ internal capacity-building efforts while also emphasizing rigorous outcomes measurement and tracking to enable grantees to demonstrate their success in serving neighborhood residents. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Gardiner, Karen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report documents the structure, study components and data sources of the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) project. In recent years, career pathways have emerged as an innovative framework for improving education, training and skills, and improving economic self-sufficiency. PACE is the first-ever randomized trial of career pathways programs, featuring 9 of the country’s leading and innovative programs.

    The evaluation design report includes:

    • an overview of PACE and the career pathways framework;
    • a description of the program selection process, the sites, and research questions;
    • a study timeline; a list of deliverables;
    • a description of the implementation study;
    • a description of the impact study; and
    • a description of the cost-benefit study; and information about data sources. (author abstract)

    This report documents the structure, study components and data sources of the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) project. In recent years, career pathways have emerged as an innovative framework for improving education, training and skills, and improving economic self-sufficiency. PACE is the first-ever randomized trial of career pathways programs, featuring 9 of the country’s leading and innovative programs.

    The evaluation design report includes:

    • an overview of PACE and the career pathways framework;
    • a description of the program selection process, the sites, and research questions;
    • a study timeline; a list of deliverables;
    • a description of the implementation study;
    • a description of the impact study; and
    • a description of the cost-benefit study; and information about data sources. (author abstract)

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