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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Rothwell, David; Thiede, Brian C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    More than one in four rural children live in a family with income below the official poverty line in 2013, compared to one in five in 1999. Possible reasons for this rise in rural poverty include changes in family composition, educational attainment, labor markets, and changes to social welfare policies. The social welfare system in the United States, comprising the full array of income transfers, tax credits, and other benefits available to those in need, was designed to offset economic hardship. While researchers have thoroughly documented the changing nature of the social welfare system including how it responded to the Great Recession, most of the work has not examined differences between rural and urban areas. In particular, relatively little is known about how the social welfare system functions for rural families with children. With the study described in this article, we seek to add to this knowledge by assessing whether current social welfare programs are effectively protecting rural families with children from poverty. (Author abstract)

    More than one in four rural children live in a family with income below the official poverty line in 2013, compared to one in five in 1999. Possible reasons for this rise in rural poverty include changes in family composition, educational attainment, labor markets, and changes to social welfare policies. The social welfare system in the United States, comprising the full array of income transfers, tax credits, and other benefits available to those in need, was designed to offset economic hardship. While researchers have thoroughly documented the changing nature of the social welfare system including how it responded to the Great Recession, most of the work has not examined differences between rural and urban areas. In particular, relatively little is known about how the social welfare system functions for rural families with children. With the study described in this article, we seek to add to this knowledge by assessing whether current social welfare programs are effectively protecting rural families with children from poverty. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ziliak, James P.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This aim of this paper is to assess the economic status of rural people five decades after publication of President Johnson's National Commission on Rural Poverty report The People Left Behind. Using data from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement of the CPS, along with county data from the Regional Economic Information System, I focus on how changes in employment, wages, and the social safety net have influenced the evolution of poverty and inequality in rural and urban places. The evidence shows that large numbers of rural Americans are disengaged from the labor market, gains in human capital attainment have stagnated, and the retreat from marriage continues for the medium- and less-skilled individuals. However, the social safety net has been more effective in redistributing income within rural areas than in urban centers. Work, education, and marriage are the three main pathways out of poverty for most Americans, whether residing in urban or rural locales, and thus making progress against poverty and inequality faces major economic and demographic headwinds. (Author...

    This aim of this paper is to assess the economic status of rural people five decades after publication of President Johnson's National Commission on Rural Poverty report The People Left Behind. Using data from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement of the CPS, along with county data from the Regional Economic Information System, I focus on how changes in employment, wages, and the social safety net have influenced the evolution of poverty and inequality in rural and urban places. The evidence shows that large numbers of rural Americans are disengaged from the labor market, gains in human capital attainment have stagnated, and the retreat from marriage continues for the medium- and less-skilled individuals. However, the social safety net has been more effective in redistributing income within rural areas than in urban centers. Work, education, and marriage are the three main pathways out of poverty for most Americans, whether residing in urban or rural locales, and thus making progress against poverty and inequality faces major economic and demographic headwinds. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Jiang, Yang; Ekono, Mercedes; Skinner, Curtis
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 32 percent of all people in poverty. Many more children live in families with incomes just above the poverty threshold. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (21 percent) live in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance. Parental education and employment, race/ethnicity, and other factors are associated with children’s experience of economic insecurity. This fact sheet describes the demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic characteristics of children and their parents. It highlights the important factors that appear to distinguish low-income and poor children from their less disadvantaged counterparts. (Author abstract)

     

    Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 32 percent of all people in poverty. Many more children live in families with incomes just above the poverty threshold. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (21 percent) live in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance. Parental education and employment, race/ethnicity, and other factors are associated with children’s experience of economic insecurity. This fact sheet describes the demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic characteristics of children and their parents. It highlights the important factors that appear to distinguish low-income and poor children from their less disadvantaged counterparts. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Jiang, Yang; Ekono, Mercedes; Skinner, Curtis
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 32 percent of all people in poverty. Many more children live in families with incomes just above the poverty threshold. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (21 percent) live in poor families. Among our oldest children, adolescents age 12 through 17 years, 40 percent live in low-income families and 19 percent live in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance. Parental education and employment, race/ethnicity, and other factors are associated with children’s experience of economic insecurity. This fact sheet describes the demographic, socio-economic, and geographic characteristics of adolescents and their parents. It highlights the important factors that appear to distinguish low-income and poor children in this age group from their less disadvantaged counterparts. (Author abstract)

     

    Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 32 percent of all people in poverty. Many more children live in families with incomes just above the poverty threshold. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (21 percent) live in poor families. Among our oldest children, adolescents age 12 through 17 years, 40 percent live in low-income families and 19 percent live in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance. Parental education and employment, race/ethnicity, and other factors are associated with children’s experience of economic insecurity. This fact sheet describes the demographic, socio-economic, and geographic characteristics of adolescents and their parents. It highlights the important factors that appear to distinguish low-income and poor children in this age group from their less disadvantaged counterparts. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Jiang, Yang; Ekono, Mercedes; Skinner, Curtis
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 32 percent of all people in poverty. Many more children live in families with incomes just above the poverty threshold. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (21 percent) live in poor families. Our very youngest children—infants and toddlers under age 3 years—appear to be particularly vulnerable, with 47 percent living in low-income families, including 24 percent living in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance. Parental education and employment, race/ethnicity, and other factors are associated with children’s experience of economic insecurity. This fact sheet describes the demographic, socio-economic, and geographic characteristics of children and their parents. It highlights important factors that appear to distinguish low-income and poor children from their less disadvantaged counterparts. (Author abstract)

     

    Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 32 percent of all people in poverty. Many more children live in families with incomes just above the poverty threshold. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (21 percent) live in poor families. Our very youngest children—infants and toddlers under age 3 years—appear to be particularly vulnerable, with 47 percent living in low-income families, including 24 percent living in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance. Parental education and employment, race/ethnicity, and other factors are associated with children’s experience of economic insecurity. This fact sheet describes the demographic, socio-economic, and geographic characteristics of children and their parents. It highlights important factors that appear to distinguish low-income and poor children from their less disadvantaged counterparts. (Author abstract)

     

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