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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth; Cornwell, Derekh; Leininger, Lindsey; Stagner, Matthew; LeBarron, Sarah; Gellar, Jonathan; MacIntyre, Sophie; Chapman, Richard; Maher, Erin J.; Pecora, Peter J.; O'Brien, Kirk
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Mathematica and Casey Family Programs have published the final report from a project linking child welfare and Medicaid data to conduct analyses to understand types of high service use and to identify factors predictive of high service use among children in foster care. The study identifies distinct types of high service users and how both child welfare and Medicaid data can be used to predict which children may be likely to experience high degrees of placement instability. The study was conducted in partnership with partners in two states—Tennessee’s Department of Children’s Services and TennCare, and Florida’s Department of Children and Families, Agency for Health Care Administration, and Eckerd Kids. The goal of the project is to help child welfare, Medicaid and other service providing agencies better coordinate service delivery to prevent undesirable outcomes for children and to improve effectiveness and efficiency. (Author abstract) 

    Mathematica and Casey Family Programs have published the final report from a project linking child welfare and Medicaid data to conduct analyses to understand types of high service use and to identify factors predictive of high service use among children in foster care. The study identifies distinct types of high service users and how both child welfare and Medicaid data can be used to predict which children may be likely to experience high degrees of placement instability. The study was conducted in partnership with partners in two states—Tennessee’s Department of Children’s Services and TennCare, and Florida’s Department of Children and Families, Agency for Health Care Administration, and Eckerd Kids. The goal of the project is to help child welfare, Medicaid and other service providing agencies better coordinate service delivery to prevent undesirable outcomes for children and to improve effectiveness and efficiency. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Natale, Ruby A.; Messiah, Sarah E.; Asfour, Lila; Uhlhorn, Susan B.; Delamater, Alan; Arheart, Kris L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Objective:

    To assess the effectiveness of a child care center-based parent and teacher healthy lifestyle role-modeling program on child nutrition and physical activity outcomes.

    Methods:

    Child care centers (N = 28) serving low-income families were randomized to intervention or control arms. Intervention centers (N = 12) implemented (1) menu modifications, (2) a child's healthy lifestyle curriculum, and (3) an adult (teacher- and parent-focused) healthy lifestyle role-modeling curriculum. Control centers (N = 16) received an attention control safety curriculum. Nutrition and physical activity data were collected at the beginning (T1) and at the end (T2) of the school year. Exploratory factor analysis identified positive and negative nutrition and physical activity practices by children, parents, and teachers.

    Results:

    Intervention parents' baseline and school year consumption of fruits/vegetables significantly increased their children's consumption of fruits/vegetables from T1 to T2....

    Objective:

    To assess the effectiveness of a child care center-based parent and teacher healthy lifestyle role-modeling program on child nutrition and physical activity outcomes.

    Methods:

    Child care centers (N = 28) serving low-income families were randomized to intervention or control arms. Intervention centers (N = 12) implemented (1) menu modifications, (2) a child's healthy lifestyle curriculum, and (3) an adult (teacher- and parent-focused) healthy lifestyle role-modeling curriculum. Control centers (N = 16) received an attention control safety curriculum. Nutrition and physical activity data were collected at the beginning (T1) and at the end (T2) of the school year. Exploratory factor analysis identified positive and negative nutrition and physical activity practices by children, parents, and teachers.

    Results:

    Intervention parents' baseline and school year consumption of fruits/vegetables significantly increased their children's consumption of fruits/vegetables from T1 to T2. Intervention parents significantly influenced a decrease in children's junk food consumption, whereas control parents significantly influenced an increase in their children's junk food consumption from T1 to T2. Control children showed a significant increase in junk food consumption and sedentary behavior from T1 to T2. Teachers did not significantly influence preschool-age children's nutrition or physical activity patterns from T1 to T2.

    Conclusions:

    Parent nutrition and physical activity patterns significantly influence their preschool-age children's consumption of fruits/vegetables, junk food, and level of sedentary behavior. Future obesity prevention intervention efforts targeting this age group should include parents as healthy lifestyle role models for their children. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Winsler, Adam; Sands, Bethany; Crane, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    It is important for researchers and practitioners to understand how early referral decisions are made in communities because the long-term consequences of an at-risk child being referred (or not) to an agency for evaluation and intervention are profound. This study explored one referral/intervention program for ethnically diverse, low-income children receiving subsidies to attend center-based child care, and examined correlates of referral recommendations made by teachers and clinicians. In 67 child-care centers, 899 children ages 3 to 4 (67% Hispanic/Latino, 25% African American, and 8% Caucasian/other) were assessed at the beginning of the academic year on cognitive, language, and social-emotional skills, and 588 of these children scored at a level suggesting follow-up. Clinicians and teachers generally agreed on the group of children recommended for further evaluation/referral and interventions. The referred group of children consisted of the children with the lowest scores on the child assessments and those whose parents and teachers showed the most disagreement on self-...

    It is important for researchers and practitioners to understand how early referral decisions are made in communities because the long-term consequences of an at-risk child being referred (or not) to an agency for evaluation and intervention are profound. This study explored one referral/intervention program for ethnically diverse, low-income children receiving subsidies to attend center-based child care, and examined correlates of referral recommendations made by teachers and clinicians. In 67 child-care centers, 899 children ages 3 to 4 (67% Hispanic/Latino, 25% African American, and 8% Caucasian/other) were assessed at the beginning of the academic year on cognitive, language, and social-emotional skills, and 588 of these children scored at a level suggesting follow-up. Clinicians and teachers generally agreed on the group of children recommended for further evaluation/referral and interventions. The referred group of children consisted of the children with the lowest scores on the child assessments and those whose parents and teachers showed the most disagreement on self-control. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schulman, Karen ; Matthews, Hannah ; Blank, Helen ; Ewen, Danielle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) — a strategy to improve families’ access to high-quality child care — assess the quality of child care programs, offer incentives and assistance to programs to improve their ratings, and give information to parents about the quality of child care. These systems are operating in a growing number of states — 22 states had statewide QRIS and four additional states had QRIS in one or more of their communities as of 2010.

    The development and implementation of QRIS is also a central component of the Race to the Top-Early Learn­ing Challenge — a federally funded competitive grant program that encourages states to strengthen their early learning systems — which will likely spur addi­tional states to establish new or expand existing QRIS. Under QRIS, child care programs receive progressively higher ratings as they meet progressively higher quality standards. States vary significantly in their approaches to QRIS, including in the number of quality levels they have, the standards they set for achieving higher quality ratings, and the...

    Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) — a strategy to improve families’ access to high-quality child care — assess the quality of child care programs, offer incentives and assistance to programs to improve their ratings, and give information to parents about the quality of child care. These systems are operating in a growing number of states — 22 states had statewide QRIS and four additional states had QRIS in one or more of their communities as of 2010.

    The development and implementation of QRIS is also a central component of the Race to the Top-Early Learn­ing Challenge — a federally funded competitive grant program that encourages states to strengthen their early learning systems — which will likely spur addi­tional states to establish new or expand existing QRIS. Under QRIS, child care programs receive progressively higher ratings as they meet progressively higher quality standards. States vary significantly in their approaches to QRIS, including in the number of quality levels they have, the standards they set for achieving higher quality ratings, and the extent to which they provide financial and other supports to help programs improve. In most states, child care programs participate on a voluntary basis, although a few states require all regulated programs to participate. Despite these variations in their QRIS, states share a common objective of encouraging better child care options so that more families have access to high-quality child care that will support their children’s learning and development.

    Given that QRIS are used in a growing number of states and communities, it is helpful to examine the range of approaches these states and communities are taking in designing and implementing QRIS. It is also important to examine the opportunities and barriers for QRIS in achieving the goals of improving the quality of child care and increasing access to high-quality child care for families, particularly for the most vulnerable families. QRIS can be a tool for improving the quality of care accessed by low-income families who cannot afford high-quality care on their own. To gain more insight into different strategies for shaping and implementing QRIS, the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) and the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) interviewed 48 child care center directors from nine states about their experiences with QRIS. The directors offered valuable perspectives on what is working in their QRIS and how the systems could be improved. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Spielberger, Julie; Gouvêa, Marcia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    For more than a decade, Florida’s Palm Beach County has been building a system of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas that have high levels of risk for poverty, teen pregnancy, crime, and child maltreatment. The Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County commissioned Chapin Hall to conduct a longitudinal mixed-methods evaluation of how families use and are affected by this system of services. This paper presents selected findings from the study about the factors—facilitators and barriers—that affect how families use services, including individual characteristics of families, program and provider characteristics, and neighborhood factors. The discussion paper concludes with suggestions for overcoming barriers to service use and improving the service system. (author abstract)

    For more than a decade, Florida’s Palm Beach County has been building a system of prevention and early intervention services to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth to age 8. The county began this effort with a set of programs focused on serving families in four targeted geographic areas that have high levels of risk for poverty, teen pregnancy, crime, and child maltreatment. The Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County commissioned Chapin Hall to conduct a longitudinal mixed-methods evaluation of how families use and are affected by this system of services. This paper presents selected findings from the study about the factors—facilitators and barriers—that affect how families use services, including individual characteristics of families, program and provider characteristics, and neighborhood factors. The discussion paper concludes with suggestions for overcoming barriers to service use and improving the service system. (author abstract)

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