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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Radel, Laura; Baldwin, Melinda; Crouse, Gilbert; Ghertner, Robin; Waters, Annette
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This study examined the relationship between parental substance misuse and child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 after more than a decade of decline. We examined county level variation in both phenomena and qualitative interviews documented the perspectives and experiences of local professionals in the child welfare agency, substance use disorder treatment programs, family courts, and other community partners in 11 communities across the country. Results describe how the child welfare system interacts with community partners to serve an increasing population of parents whose substance use has impaired their parenting and placed their children at risk. (Author abstract) 

    This study examined the relationship between parental substance misuse and child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 after more than a decade of decline. We examined county level variation in both phenomena and qualitative interviews documented the perspectives and experiences of local professionals in the child welfare agency, substance use disorder treatment programs, family courts, and other community partners in 11 communities across the country. Results describe how the child welfare system interacts with community partners to serve an increasing population of parents whose substance use has impaired their parenting and placed their children at risk. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Schenck-Fontaine, Anika; Gassman-Pines, Anna; Gibson-Davis, Christina; Ananat, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    A growing body of literature suggests that economic downturns predict an increase in child maltreatment. However, to inform policies and practices to prevent and intervene in child maltreatment, it is necessary to identify how, when, and under what conditions community-level economic conditions affect child maltreatment. In this study, we use North Carolina administrative data from 2006 to 2011 on child maltreatment reports and job losses to distinguish effects on maltreatment frequency from effects on severity, identify the timing of these effects, and test whether community characteristics moderate these effects. To isolate effects of unanticipated job losses and to control for potential confounding factors, we use a fixed effects regression approach. We find that, though job losses did not affect the frequency of reports, job losses increased the share of reports that were relatively severe. This effect endured for 9 months following job losses and was only evident in economically disadvantaged communities. (Author abstract)

     

    A growing body of literature suggests that economic downturns predict an increase in child maltreatment. However, to inform policies and practices to prevent and intervene in child maltreatment, it is necessary to identify how, when, and under what conditions community-level economic conditions affect child maltreatment. In this study, we use North Carolina administrative data from 2006 to 2011 on child maltreatment reports and job losses to distinguish effects on maltreatment frequency from effects on severity, identify the timing of these effects, and test whether community characteristics moderate these effects. To isolate effects of unanticipated job losses and to control for potential confounding factors, we use a fixed effects regression approach. We find that, though job losses did not affect the frequency of reports, job losses increased the share of reports that were relatively severe. This effect endured for 9 months following job losses and was only evident in economically disadvantaged communities. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Gustafsson, Hanna C.; Cox, Martha J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Despite evidence that individuals living in low-income and rural communities may be at heightened risk for intimate partner violence (IPV), little is known about the prevalence and nature of IPV occurring in these communities. The goal of the current study, therefore, was to characterize IPV occurring in a population-based sample of families living in communities characterized by rural poverty. Specifically, we examined the prevalence, severity, and chronicity of IPV occurring in this high-risk sample, as well as the demographic correlates thereof. Using data from multiple assessments across the first 5 years of their child’s life, we also examined changes in the prevalence of IPV across this time. Results indicate that IPV was most prevalent around the birth of the target child and that the population-level prevalence of IPV decreased significantly over the subsequent 5 years. Although previous research suggests that children under the age of five are at heightened risk for IPV relative to older children, this is the first study to our knowledge to demonstrate that there are...

    Despite evidence that individuals living in low-income and rural communities may be at heightened risk for intimate partner violence (IPV), little is known about the prevalence and nature of IPV occurring in these communities. The goal of the current study, therefore, was to characterize IPV occurring in a population-based sample of families living in communities characterized by rural poverty. Specifically, we examined the prevalence, severity, and chronicity of IPV occurring in this high-risk sample, as well as the demographic correlates thereof. Using data from multiple assessments across the first 5 years of their child’s life, we also examined changes in the prevalence of IPV across this time. Results indicate that IPV was most prevalent around the birth of the target child and that the population-level prevalence of IPV decreased significantly over the subsequent 5 years. Although previous research suggests that children under the age of five are at heightened risk for IPV relative to older children, this is the first study to our knowledge to demonstrate that there are changes in the prevalence of IPV within this high-risk age period. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Person, Ann E. ; Clary, Elizabeth; Zief, Susan; Adamek, Katie; Caplan, Valerie; Worthington, Julie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report is the first systematic description of the Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) grant program’s efforts to support expectant and parenting youth. It examines early grant implementation among the 17 states and Indian tribes awarded PAF grants in 2013. The study team gathered and analyzed data from two sources: (1) a standardized review of grant applications, and (2) telephone interviews with administrators representing the 17 grantees. Drawing upon systematic analysis of both data sources, this report describes how grantees developed their strategic approaches and the contextual factors that influenced their decisions. It examines how grantees’ design choices address the wide-ranging needs of expectant and parenting youth and how grantees’ administrative structures support program implementation. It also provides a set of profiles summarizing each grantee’s specific program approach. (Author abstract)

     

    This report is the first systematic description of the Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) grant program’s efforts to support expectant and parenting youth. It examines early grant implementation among the 17 states and Indian tribes awarded PAF grants in 2013. The study team gathered and analyzed data from two sources: (1) a standardized review of grant applications, and (2) telephone interviews with administrators representing the 17 grantees. Drawing upon systematic analysis of both data sources, this report describes how grantees developed their strategic approaches and the contextual factors that influenced their decisions. It examines how grantees’ design choices address the wide-ranging needs of expectant and parenting youth and how grantees’ administrative structures support program implementation. It also provides a set of profiles summarizing each grantee’s specific program approach. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Rodriquez, Yuliana; Helms, Heather M.; Supple, Andrew J.; Hengstebeck, Natalie D.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    With a sample of 120 Mexican-origin couples, we examined the extent to which wives’ marriage work (i.e., discussions about marital concerns) with husband and marriage work with friend moderated associations between wives’ acculturative stress and spouses’ marital satisfaction and marital negativity. Results from a series of multiple regression analyses showed that wives’ marriage work with husbands (a) served to protect husbands’ marital quality from wives’ acculturative stress and (b) was linked with greater marital satisfaction for wives. These findings represent an important first step in understanding the sociocultural factors that compromise and protect marital quality for couples of Mexican origin as they navigate the challenges of adapting to life in the United States. (Author abstract) 

    With a sample of 120 Mexican-origin couples, we examined the extent to which wives’ marriage work (i.e., discussions about marital concerns) with husband and marriage work with friend moderated associations between wives’ acculturative stress and spouses’ marital satisfaction and marital negativity. Results from a series of multiple regression analyses showed that wives’ marriage work with husbands (a) served to protect husbands’ marital quality from wives’ acculturative stress and (b) was linked with greater marital satisfaction for wives. These findings represent an important first step in understanding the sociocultural factors that compromise and protect marital quality for couples of Mexican origin as they navigate the challenges of adapting to life in the United States. (Author abstract) 

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