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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Fishman, Mike
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the findings from an implementation study of four separate training programs for long-term unemployed workers. This presentation discusses the policy context, evaluation overview, ready-to-work grantee programs, and key findings of the study.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the findings from an implementation study of four separate training programs for long-term unemployed workers. This presentation discusses the policy context, evaluation overview, ready-to-work grantee programs, and key findings of the study.

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Copson, Elizabeth; Schneider, Glen; Elkin, Sam; Sarfo, Bright; Kappil, Tresa; Ma, Claire; Morrison, Carly; Nakas, Audra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    A key challenge facing policymakers and program administrators is how to develop effective strategies to help Americans facing economic challenges, particularly the long-term unemployed, to succeed in the labor market. During the deep recession of 2008-2009, an unprecedented number of workers lost their jobs and many remained under- or unemployed, even as the economy recovered. Identifying what strategies that can help them regain their economic footing has been a priority, with a particular interest in employment in higher-paying middle- and high-skill jobs that are in demand by American businesses.

    As part of this effort, in 2014, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) funded the Ready to Work (RTW) Partnership grant program that is the focus of this report. RTW grants went to partnerships of workforce agencies, training providers, employers, and other organizations, to improve the employment prospects of the long-term unemployed by providing a range of customized services including training and job search assistance. The intent of the RTW grant program is to establish...

    A key challenge facing policymakers and program administrators is how to develop effective strategies to help Americans facing economic challenges, particularly the long-term unemployed, to succeed in the labor market. During the deep recession of 2008-2009, an unprecedented number of workers lost their jobs and many remained under- or unemployed, even as the economy recovered. Identifying what strategies that can help them regain their economic footing has been a priority, with a particular interest in employment in higher-paying middle- and high-skill jobs that are in demand by American businesses.

    As part of this effort, in 2014, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) funded the Ready to Work (RTW) Partnership grant program that is the focus of this report. RTW grants went to partnerships of workforce agencies, training providers, employers, and other organizations, to improve the employment prospects of the long-term unemployed by providing a range of customized services including training and job search assistance. The intent of the RTW grant program is to establish programs that might prove effective in preparing U.S. workers for employment, particularly in occupations and industries being filled by foreign workers through the H-1B visa program. In 2014, DOL awarded four-year grants totaling $170 million to 23 grantees, with individual awards ranging from $3 to $10 million.

    DOL's Employment and Training Administration, in collaboration with the Chief Evaluation Office, sponsored a rigorous evaluation of the RTW grant program. The evaluation includes an implementation and impact study and is being conducted by Abt Associates and its partner MEF Associates. In consultation with DOL, the evaluation team purposively selected four grantees for study based on their program design and scale.

    This report documents early findings from the evaluation's implementation study of the four grantees. For each grantee, the report describes the design and operation of its grant-funded program components, including staff guidance, occupational training, employment readiness and job search assistance, work-based training, and other services individualized to each participant's needs and skill gaps. The report also presents key findings related to the implementation and operation of the programs. Future reports will examine the effectiveness of the four grantee programs individually in improving participants' education and employment outcomes. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blumenberg, Evelyn; Pierce, Gregory; Smart, Michael
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Access to automobiles may be particularly important to housing voucher recipients, who are more likely than residents of public housing to live in suburban neighborhoods where transit service is often limited. Access to high-quality public transit is more likely to benefit low-income households who live in dense central-city neighborhoods in close proximity to employment. In this analysis we draw on survey data from two housing voucher experiments—the Moving to Opportunity for Fair Housing and Welfare-to-Work Voucher programs—to examine the relationship between access to automobiles and public transit and the employment and earnings outcomes of program participants.

    Our research underscores the importance of automobiles in achieving desirable outcomes for families who receive subsidized housing. Access to automobiles is associated with improved economic outcomes for all program participants and better facilitates job acquisition, job retention, and earnings than public transit. Our findings suggest the need to better link housing and transportation programs and to pursue a...

    Access to automobiles may be particularly important to housing voucher recipients, who are more likely than residents of public housing to live in suburban neighborhoods where transit service is often limited. Access to high-quality public transit is more likely to benefit low-income households who live in dense central-city neighborhoods in close proximity to employment. In this analysis we draw on survey data from two housing voucher experiments—the Moving to Opportunity for Fair Housing and Welfare-to-Work Voucher programs—to examine the relationship between access to automobiles and public transit and the employment and earnings outcomes of program participants.

    Our research underscores the importance of automobiles in achieving desirable outcomes for families who receive subsidized housing. Access to automobiles is associated with improved economic outcomes for all program participants and better facilitates job acquisition, job retention, and earnings than public transit. Our findings suggest the need to better link housing and transportation programs and to pursue a set of policies that increase automobile access among all subsidized housing recipients. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Abt Associates Inc.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This report provides detailed information about the planned impact analyses for the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) project. The PACE Impact Study is designed to answer questions about the overall program effectiveness for the nine programs in PACE, each involving a different configuration of career pathways design components.

    This report provides a description of the nine programs studied, summarizes the characteristics of the sample enrolled in each program, and specifies the hypotheses that PACE will test in separate analyses for each of the programs in the study.

    This document supplements the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation Design Report released in June 2015. (Author abstract)

     

    This report provides detailed information about the planned impact analyses for the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) project. The PACE Impact Study is designed to answer questions about the overall program effectiveness for the nine programs in PACE, each involving a different configuration of career pathways design components.

    This report provides a description of the nine programs studied, summarizes the characteristics of the sample enrolled in each program, and specifies the hypotheses that PACE will test in separate analyses for each of the programs in the study.

    This document supplements the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation Design Report released in June 2015. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Adess, Nancy; Binkley, Amber J.; Graves, Rebecca; Kim, Jee-Young; Tengue, Afi; Vesneski, Bill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, together with its grantees, is working to build greater financial opportunity and security in the communities across the Pacific Northwest. We prioritize support for financial security because we believe it is a critical foundation for disrupting poverty and building a level of wealth that can buffer families from devastating economic setbacks.

    Despite the efforts of many groups and partners working to alleviate poverty, national trends concerning wealth are disconcerting because they appear to be moving in the wrong direction. For example, according to The Urban Institute, approximately 30 percent of American households live from paycheck to paycheck, without an adequate financial safety net. The Pew Research Center has found that disparities in wealth between Native populations and white populations are pronounced, while wealth gaps between white households and households of other races and ethnicities are widening.

    This report highlights organizations that are reversing these trends. We examine six projects that are taking...

    The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, together with its grantees, is working to build greater financial opportunity and security in the communities across the Pacific Northwest. We prioritize support for financial security because we believe it is a critical foundation for disrupting poverty and building a level of wealth that can buffer families from devastating economic setbacks.

    Despite the efforts of many groups and partners working to alleviate poverty, national trends concerning wealth are disconcerting because they appear to be moving in the wrong direction. For example, according to The Urban Institute, approximately 30 percent of American households live from paycheck to paycheck, without an adequate financial safety net. The Pew Research Center has found that disparities in wealth between Native populations and white populations are pronounced, while wealth gaps between white households and households of other races and ethnicities are widening.

    This report highlights organizations that are reversing these trends. We examine six projects that are taking bold approaches to solve one of the biggest challenges in our country today: disrupting poverty by building financial security. The report highlights lessons and best practices gleaned from our examination of a variety of projects that we and other foundations support. We expect that this information can help practitioners and funders as they look for opportunities to strengthen financial security and foster wealth-building initiatives across the country. (author abstract)

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