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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: O'Leary, Christopher J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Research in the 1970s based on observational data provided evidence consistent with predictions from economic theory that paying unemployment insurance (UI) benefits to involuntarily jobless workers prolongs unemployment. However, some scholars also reported estimates that the additional time spent in subsidized job search was productive. That is, UI receipt tended to raise reemployment wages after work search among the unemployed. A series of field experiments in the 1980s investigated positive incentives to overcome the work disincentive effects of UI. These were followed by experiments in the 1990s that evaluated the effects of restrictions on UI eligibility through stronger work search requirements and alternative uses of UI. The new century has seen some related field experiments in employment policy, and reexamination of the earlier experimental results. This paper reviews the experimental evidence and considers it in the context of the current federal-state UI system. (author abstract)

    Research in the 1970s based on observational data provided evidence consistent with predictions from economic theory that paying unemployment insurance (UI) benefits to involuntarily jobless workers prolongs unemployment. However, some scholars also reported estimates that the additional time spent in subsidized job search was productive. That is, UI receipt tended to raise reemployment wages after work search among the unemployed. A series of field experiments in the 1980s investigated positive incentives to overcome the work disincentive effects of UI. These were followed by experiments in the 1990s that evaluated the effects of restrictions on UI eligibility through stronger work search requirements and alternative uses of UI. The new century has seen some related field experiments in employment policy, and reexamination of the earlier experimental results. This paper reviews the experimental evidence and considers it in the context of the current federal-state UI system. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pendall, Rolf; Hendey, Leah; Greenberg, David; Pettit, Kathryn L.S.; Levy, Diane; Khare, Amy; Gallagher, Megan; Joseph, Mark; Curley, Alexandra; Rasheed, Aesha; Latham, Nancy; Brecher, Audra ; Hailey, Chantal
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (Choice) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) aims to transform distressed, high-poverty rate neighborhoods into revitalized mixed-income neighborhoods. Its primary vehicle to catalyze this transformation is the rebuilding of distressed public and assisted housing into energy-efficient, mixed-income housing that is physically and financially viable. (author abstract)

    The Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (Choice) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) aims to transform distressed, high-poverty rate neighborhoods into revitalized mixed-income neighborhoods. Its primary vehicle to catalyze this transformation is the rebuilding of distressed public and assisted housing into energy-efficient, mixed-income housing that is physically and financially viable. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wiley-Robinson, Tonya; Davis, Reginald; Bigelow, Justin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The recent economic downturn has tremendously impacted communities and families in the United States, especially young families. There is a growing chorus of voices calling for new models and solutions that meet the needs of both young parents and their children collectively. Two-generation programming provides an important poverty reduction roadmap for young families, making service providers, policy makers, and government officials critical stakeholders in moving this strategy forward. This policy report summarizes findings from direct service providers and advocates in advancing two-generation strategies. The recommendations outline both federal and state-level policies and regulatory actions to strengthen this approach. It also addresses critical organizational capacity imperatives for existing direct service providers. These policy priorities should provide a comprehensive framework to support young parents and their children toward economic mobility. (author abstract) 

    The recent economic downturn has tremendously impacted communities and families in the United States, especially young families. There is a growing chorus of voices calling for new models and solutions that meet the needs of both young parents and their children collectively. Two-generation programming provides an important poverty reduction roadmap for young families, making service providers, policy makers, and government officials critical stakeholders in moving this strategy forward. This policy report summarizes findings from direct service providers and advocates in advancing two-generation strategies. The recommendations outline both federal and state-level policies and regulatory actions to strengthen this approach. It also addresses critical organizational capacity imperatives for existing direct service providers. These policy priorities should provide a comprehensive framework to support young parents and their children toward economic mobility. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Kaz, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report provides an extensive overview of Washington’s Basic Food Employment & Training (BFET) program and, more broadly, of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T).

    BFET is viewed as a national model for expanding SNAP E&T programs by building on the existing service delivery capacity of community colleges and community-based workforce training providers. This paper covers the history and development of the BFET program; the nuts and bolts of how the BFET program operates; how the BFET program is utilized by community colleges and community-based organizations; and a short overview of program outcomes. The paper summarizes the best practices that have emerged from BFET and offers recommendations to other states and localities in expanding SNAP E&T programs. (Author abstract)

    This report provides an extensive overview of Washington’s Basic Food Employment & Training (BFET) program and, more broadly, of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T).

    BFET is viewed as a national model for expanding SNAP E&T programs by building on the existing service delivery capacity of community colleges and community-based workforce training providers. This paper covers the history and development of the BFET program; the nuts and bolts of how the BFET program operates; how the BFET program is utilized by community colleges and community-based organizations; and a short overview of program outcomes. The paper summarizes the best practices that have emerged from BFET and offers recommendations to other states and localities in expanding SNAP E&T programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Abraham, Katharine G.; Houseman, Susan N.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    During the recent recession only seventeen states offered short-time compensation (STC)—prorated unemployment benefits for workers whose hours are reduced for economic reasons. Federal legislation passed in 2012 will encourage the expansion of STC. Exploiting cross-state variation in STC, we present new evidence indicating that jobs saved during the recession as a consequence of STC may have been significant in manufacturing, but that the overall scale of the STC program was generally too small to have substantially mitigated aggregate job losses in the seventeen states. Expansion of the program is necessary for STC to be an effective countercyclical tool in the future. (Author abstract)

     

    During the recent recession only seventeen states offered short-time compensation (STC)—prorated unemployment benefits for workers whose hours are reduced for economic reasons. Federal legislation passed in 2012 will encourage the expansion of STC. Exploiting cross-state variation in STC, we present new evidence indicating that jobs saved during the recession as a consequence of STC may have been significant in manufacturing, but that the overall scale of the STC program was generally too small to have substantially mitigated aggregate job losses in the seventeen states. Expansion of the program is necessary for STC to be an effective countercyclical tool in the future. (Author abstract)

     

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