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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Jardim, Ekaterina ; Long, Mark C.; Plotnick, Robert ; van Inwegen, Emma ; Vigdor, Jacob ; Wething, Hilary
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This paper evaluates the wage, employment, and hours effects of the first and second phase-in of the Seattle Minimum Wage Ordinance, which raised the minimum wage from $9.47 to $11 per hour in 2015 and to $13 per hour in 2016. Using a variety of methods to analyze employment in all sectors paying below a specified real hourly rate, we conclude that the second wage increase to $13 reduced hours worked in low-wage jobs by around 9 percent, while hourly wages in such jobs increased by around 3 percent. Consequently, total payroll fell for such jobs, implying that the minimum wage ordinance lowered low-wage employees’ earnings by an average of $125 per month in 2016. Evidence attributes more modest effects to the first wage increase. We estimate an effect of zero when analyzing employment in the restaurant industry at all wage levels, comparable to many prior studies. (Author abstract)

     

    This paper evaluates the wage, employment, and hours effects of the first and second phase-in of the Seattle Minimum Wage Ordinance, which raised the minimum wage from $9.47 to $11 per hour in 2015 and to $13 per hour in 2016. Using a variety of methods to analyze employment in all sectors paying below a specified real hourly rate, we conclude that the second wage increase to $13 reduced hours worked in low-wage jobs by around 9 percent, while hourly wages in such jobs increased by around 3 percent. Consequently, total payroll fell for such jobs, implying that the minimum wage ordinance lowered low-wage employees’ earnings by an average of $125 per month in 2016. Evidence attributes more modest effects to the first wage increase. We estimate an effect of zero when analyzing employment in the restaurant industry at all wage levels, comparable to many prior studies. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Fan, Z. Joyce; Black, Callie; Felver, Barbara E. M.; Lucenko, Barbara A.; Danielson, Taylor
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report provides demographic and employment information for those participants enrolled in the Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) program during the first year of its five-year implementation period. BEST offers evidence-based supported employment services to individuals with severe mental illnesses and co-occurring substance disorders in an effort to reduce long-term unemployment and improve participant well-being. Of the 102 participants who enrolled in the first year of the program, 57% were unemployed for the entirety of the year prior to joining the program. Participants in Grant and Clark counties received intensive supported employment services and other types of mental health outpatient services to manage their behavioral health needs. Preliminary comparisons of pre- and post-enrollment employment rates indicate that participant employed increased by 23%, with 53% of all participants having some form of employment following enrollment in the program. Future analyses will focus on longer-term outcomes and will include a statically matched comparison group to control...

    This report provides demographic and employment information for those participants enrolled in the Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) program during the first year of its five-year implementation period. BEST offers evidence-based supported employment services to individuals with severe mental illnesses and co-occurring substance disorders in an effort to reduce long-term unemployment and improve participant well-being. Of the 102 participants who enrolled in the first year of the program, 57% were unemployed for the entirety of the year prior to joining the program. Participants in Grant and Clark counties received intensive supported employment services and other types of mental health outpatient services to manage their behavioral health needs. Preliminary comparisons of pre- and post-enrollment employment rates indicate that participant employed increased by 23%, with 53% of all participants having some form of employment following enrollment in the program. Future analyses will focus on longer-term outcomes and will include a statically matched comparison group to control for other sources of change. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Chrisinger, Colleen K.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This paper compares the employment status and earnings of veterans and nonveterans following their receipt of public workforce development services in Washington State during the years 2002–2012. It also describes workforce program participation patterns for veterans and nonveterans to determine if veterans have equal or prioritized access to key programs, where prioritization is required by law. Based on tabulations and propensity score weighted regressions using administrative data, the results indicate slightly lower levels of participation by veterans than nonveterans in two major workforce programs (Wagner-Peyser and the Workforce Investment Act Adult program), and high participation in veteran-specific programs (Disabled Veterans Outreach Program and Local Veterans Employment Representative). Employment rates of veterans after program receipt are substantially lower than those for nonveterans. Meanwhile, average earnings are slightly higher, conditional on employment. These results highlight the ongoing challenge of closing the gap in employment between veterans and...

    This paper compares the employment status and earnings of veterans and nonveterans following their receipt of public workforce development services in Washington State during the years 2002–2012. It also describes workforce program participation patterns for veterans and nonveterans to determine if veterans have equal or prioritized access to key programs, where prioritization is required by law. Based on tabulations and propensity score weighted regressions using administrative data, the results indicate slightly lower levels of participation by veterans than nonveterans in two major workforce programs (Wagner-Peyser and the Workforce Investment Act Adult program), and high participation in veteran-specific programs (Disabled Veterans Outreach Program and Local Veterans Employment Representative). Employment rates of veterans after program receipt are substantially lower than those for nonveterans. Meanwhile, average earnings are slightly higher, conditional on employment. These results highlight the ongoing challenge of closing the gap in employment between veterans and nonveterans to reach goals stated by policymakers. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Plotnick, Robert; Moore, Kathleen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This report provides evidence on how NCP, CP and case characteristics are associated with the likelihood of compliance. The findings help identify the characteristics that predict how long a case is likely to remain compliant, the kinds of cases that are more likely to fall out of compliance, and how long non-compliant cases are likely to remain out of compliance. (Excerpt from author executive summary)

    This report provides evidence on how NCP, CP and case characteristics are associated with the likelihood of compliance. The findings help identify the characteristics that predict how long a case is likely to remain compliant, the kinds of cases that are more likely to fall out of compliance, and how long non-compliant cases are likely to remain out of compliance. (Excerpt from author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Lee, Hedwig; Andrew, Megan; Gebremariam, Achamyeleh; Lumeng, Julie C.; Lee, Joyce M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Objectives. We examined the relationship between timing of poverty and risk of first-incidence obesity from ages 3 to 15.5 years. Methods. We used the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (1991–2007) to study 1150 children with repeated measures of income, weight, and height from birth to 15.5 years in 10 US cities. Our dependent variable was the first incidence of obesity (body mass index ≥ 95th percentile). We measured poverty (income-to-needs ratio < 2) prior to age 2 years and a lagged, time-varying measure of poverty between ages 2 and 12 years. We estimated discrete-time hazard models of the relative risk of first transition to obesity. Results. Poverty prior to age 2 years was associated with risk of obesity by age 15.5 years in fully adjusted models. These associations did not vary by gender. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that there are enduring associations between early life poverty and adolescent obesity. This stage in the life course may serve as a critical...

    Objectives. We examined the relationship between timing of poverty and risk of first-incidence obesity from ages 3 to 15.5 years. Methods. We used the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (1991–2007) to study 1150 children with repeated measures of income, weight, and height from birth to 15.5 years in 10 US cities. Our dependent variable was the first incidence of obesity (body mass index ≥ 95th percentile). We measured poverty (income-to-needs ratio < 2) prior to age 2 years and a lagged, time-varying measure of poverty between ages 2 and 12 years. We estimated discrete-time hazard models of the relative risk of first transition to obesity. Results. Poverty prior to age 2 years was associated with risk of obesity by age 15.5 years in fully adjusted models. These associations did not vary by gender. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that there are enduring associations between early life poverty and adolescent obesity. This stage in the life course may serve as a critical period for both poverty and obesity prevention.  (author abstract)

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