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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Northrop, Rebecca; Jones, Christopher; Laluces, Dalton; Green, La Tonya; Crumel, Kenya; Vandawalker, Melissa; Henry, Meghan; Solari, Claudia D.; Locke, Gretchen; Khadduri, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the...

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the period covered by Phase I of the evaluation solidifying partner roles and responsibilities and developing the systems and procedures needed to accommodate this new and complex approach to providing affordable housing for people with disabilities. The pace of attracting properties and units to the program and leasing units has been slower than HUD and grantees expected for a variety of reasons, such as tight housing market conditions (high-price and low-vacancy), difficulty aligning housing and services, program requirements, and location mismatch. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Woolverton, Maria; Bradley, M.C.; Gabel, George; Melz, Heidi
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation. This session provided examples from two federal initiatives that used evaluation tollgates to build evidence in child welfare. Maria Woolverton (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation. This session provided examples from two federal initiatives that used evaluation tollgates to build evidence in child welfare. Maria Woolverton (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Chocolaad, Yvette; Wandner, Stephen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The National Association of State Workforce Agencies conducted a nationwide assessment to understand current research and evaluation capacity within state workforce agencies (SWAs). This report summarizes the responses and findings from forty-one states; identifies technical assistance and capacity needs by research skill area, and catalogues recent research publications produced by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The feedback gathered from the first set of questions gauges the interest or demand by SWAs, governors, and legislatures for the types of research and evaluations that can be produced; and the types of state and/or outside researcher partnerships related to funding, conducting, or participating in research and evaluation projects. The second set of questions focus on understanding the current SWA staff capacity (levels, experiences, and skills) to conduct research and evaluation; types and levels of funding; kinds of research and evaluation studies produced with or without partners from calendar years (CY) 2011 to 2015; and plans to initiate new studies or evaluations...

    The National Association of State Workforce Agencies conducted a nationwide assessment to understand current research and evaluation capacity within state workforce agencies (SWAs). This report summarizes the responses and findings from forty-one states; identifies technical assistance and capacity needs by research skill area, and catalogues recent research publications produced by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The feedback gathered from the first set of questions gauges the interest or demand by SWAs, governors, and legislatures for the types of research and evaluations that can be produced; and the types of state and/or outside researcher partnerships related to funding, conducting, or participating in research and evaluation projects. The second set of questions focus on understanding the current SWA staff capacity (levels, experiences, and skills) to conduct research and evaluation; types and levels of funding; kinds of research and evaluation studies produced with or without partners from calendar years (CY) 2011 to 2015; and plans to initiate new studies or evaluations with or without outside contractor or partner support during calendar years 2016 through 2018. The third set of questions asked the states to identify individual studies and evaluations, including the authors and partners, research methods used, data sets accessed, central research question addressed, and approximate cost of the study.

    A second part of the report features case studies of two states: Washington and Ohio, that have developed significant capacity in the area of research and evaluation. Both states provided extensive background and historical information related to the evolution of their longitudinal administrative data systems to support research studies and evaluations; described the roles and functions of the different organizations within their respective states that conduct, coordinate, or support research and evaluation on workforce programs; explained how data sharing requests are processed and data is confidentially secured; and discussed specific studies, assessments, and surveys conducted on workforce programs. The states also shared additional information about computer systems and software, staffing, program and budget environments; and described relationships between research data centers, state workforce investment boards, research plans, and management use of evidence-based policy-formation supported by the research and evaluation entities in each state. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Adess, Nancy; Binkley, Amber J.; Graves, Rebecca; Kim, Jee-Young; Tengue, Afi; Vesneski, Bill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, together with its grantees, is working to build greater financial opportunity and security in the communities across the Pacific Northwest. We prioritize support for financial security because we believe it is a critical foundation for disrupting poverty and building a level of wealth that can buffer families from devastating economic setbacks.

    Despite the efforts of many groups and partners working to alleviate poverty, national trends concerning wealth are disconcerting because they appear to be moving in the wrong direction. For example, according to The Urban Institute, approximately 30 percent of American households live from paycheck to paycheck, without an adequate financial safety net. The Pew Research Center has found that disparities in wealth between Native populations and white populations are pronounced, while wealth gaps between white households and households of other races and ethnicities are widening.

    This report highlights organizations that are reversing these trends. We examine six projects that are taking...

    The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, together with its grantees, is working to build greater financial opportunity and security in the communities across the Pacific Northwest. We prioritize support for financial security because we believe it is a critical foundation for disrupting poverty and building a level of wealth that can buffer families from devastating economic setbacks.

    Despite the efforts of many groups and partners working to alleviate poverty, national trends concerning wealth are disconcerting because they appear to be moving in the wrong direction. For example, according to The Urban Institute, approximately 30 percent of American households live from paycheck to paycheck, without an adequate financial safety net. The Pew Research Center has found that disparities in wealth between Native populations and white populations are pronounced, while wealth gaps between white households and households of other races and ethnicities are widening.

    This report highlights organizations that are reversing these trends. We examine six projects that are taking bold approaches to solve one of the biggest challenges in our country today: disrupting poverty by building financial security. The report highlights lessons and best practices gleaned from our examination of a variety of projects that we and other foundations support. We expect that this information can help practitioners and funders as they look for opportunities to strengthen financial security and foster wealth-building initiatives across the country. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Glosser, Asaph; Hamadyk, Jill; Wille, Jessica
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    A substantial skills gap exists between the education and training of the labor force and the needs of employers in many high growth industries, including healthcare and manufacturing. This gap results in unemployment while good paying jobs go unfilled. At the same time, many low-skilled adults persist in low wage work with little opportunity for advancement.

    Career pathways programs, like the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County Health Careers for All (HCA) program, are an approach to fill a vital need for skilled workers in the economy and offer low-wage workers the opportunity to obtain occupational and other skills and advance into the middle class.

    This brief was produced by Abt Associates as part of the Innovative Strategies to Increase Self-Sufficiency (ISIS) project, a random assignment evaluation of nine promising career pathways programs that aim to improve employment and self-sufficiency outcomes for low-income, low-skilled individuals. (author abstract)

    A substantial skills gap exists between the education and training of the labor force and the needs of employers in many high growth industries, including healthcare and manufacturing. This gap results in unemployment while good paying jobs go unfilled. At the same time, many low-skilled adults persist in low wage work with little opportunity for advancement.

    Career pathways programs, like the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County Health Careers for All (HCA) program, are an approach to fill a vital need for skilled workers in the economy and offer low-wage workers the opportunity to obtain occupational and other skills and advance into the middle class.

    This brief was produced by Abt Associates as part of the Innovative Strategies to Increase Self-Sufficiency (ISIS) project, a random assignment evaluation of nine promising career pathways programs that aim to improve employment and self-sufficiency outcomes for low-income, low-skilled individuals. (author abstract)

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