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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Chrisinger, Colleen K.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This paper compares the employment status and earnings of veterans and nonveterans following their receipt of public workforce development services in Washington State during the years 2002–2012. It also describes workforce program participation patterns for veterans and nonveterans to determine if veterans have equal or prioritized access to key programs, where prioritization is required by law. Based on tabulations and propensity score weighted regressions using administrative data, the results indicate slightly lower levels of participation by veterans than nonveterans in two major workforce programs (Wagner-Peyser and the Workforce Investment Act Adult program), and high participation in veteran-specific programs (Disabled Veterans Outreach Program and Local Veterans Employment Representative). Employment rates of veterans after program receipt are substantially lower than those for nonveterans. Meanwhile, average earnings are slightly higher, conditional on employment. These results highlight the ongoing challenge of closing the gap in employment between veterans and...

    This paper compares the employment status and earnings of veterans and nonveterans following their receipt of public workforce development services in Washington State during the years 2002–2012. It also describes workforce program participation patterns for veterans and nonveterans to determine if veterans have equal or prioritized access to key programs, where prioritization is required by law. Based on tabulations and propensity score weighted regressions using administrative data, the results indicate slightly lower levels of participation by veterans than nonveterans in two major workforce programs (Wagner-Peyser and the Workforce Investment Act Adult program), and high participation in veteran-specific programs (Disabled Veterans Outreach Program and Local Veterans Employment Representative). Employment rates of veterans after program receipt are substantially lower than those for nonveterans. Meanwhile, average earnings are slightly higher, conditional on employment. These results highlight the ongoing challenge of closing the gap in employment between veterans and nonveterans to reach goals stated by policymakers. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sama-Miller, Emily; Makowsky, Libby; Rowe, Gretchen; Brown, Elizabeth; Clary, Elizabeth; Castner, Laura; Satake, Miki
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This study reports on a project launched in 2010 to pilot and evaluate innovative strategies to reduce SNAP participation barriers for low-income elderly by leveraging new data-sharing requirements related to Medicare assistance programs that help pay for prescription drugs or Medicare premiums. SNAP accesses the medical assistance program data and contacts those individuals that appear SNAP eligible. Grants were awarded to New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Washington. (author abstract)

    This study reports on a project launched in 2010 to pilot and evaluate innovative strategies to reduce SNAP participation barriers for low-income elderly by leveraging new data-sharing requirements related to Medicare assistance programs that help pay for prescription drugs or Medicare premiums. SNAP accesses the medical assistance program data and contacts those individuals that appear SNAP eligible. Grants were awarded to New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Washington. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ford Shah, Melissa; Mancuso, David C.; He, Lijian; Kozak, Stephen
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    This study examines the effectiveness of Washington State’s Medicaid Buy-In (MBI) program—Healthcare for Workers With Disabilities (HWD)—which gives workers with disabilities who earn too much for conventional Medicaid the opportunity to purchase full Medicaid coverage by paying a monthly premium based on a sliding income scale. The authors compare HWD enrollees who recently had conventional Medicaid coverage to a statistically matched group of individuals who had conventional Medicaid coverage in recent history and at baseline. Their findings suggest that MBI in Washington State is encouraging work, increasing earnings, and decreasing reliance on food stamps while providing medical coverage to a vulnerable population for whom continuous health insurance is particularly important. (Author abstract)

    This study examines the effectiveness of Washington State’s Medicaid Buy-In (MBI) program—Healthcare for Workers With Disabilities (HWD)—which gives workers with disabilities who earn too much for conventional Medicaid the opportunity to purchase full Medicaid coverage by paying a monthly premium based on a sliding income scale. The authors compare HWD enrollees who recently had conventional Medicaid coverage to a statistically matched group of individuals who had conventional Medicaid coverage in recent history and at baseline. Their findings suggest that MBI in Washington State is encouraging work, increasing earnings, and decreasing reliance on food stamps while providing medical coverage to a vulnerable population for whom continuous health insurance is particularly important. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chaudry, Ajay; Pedroza, Juan M.; Sandstrom, Heather; Danzinger, Anna; Grosz, Michel; Scott, Molly; Ting, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This research report presents the findings from a qualitative study of the child care choices of low-income working families in two urban communities.  Participants included 86 parents with young children, many of whom were immigrants, English language learners, or parents of children with special needs.  We discuss the key themes and variations in family experiences, giving particular attention to parental preferences and the factors that influenced their decisions, within the contexts of their employment and the early care and education programs in their communities.  We conclude with policy recommendations that can promote parental access to affordable and high quality care. (author abstract)

    This research report presents the findings from a qualitative study of the child care choices of low-income working families in two urban communities.  Participants included 86 parents with young children, many of whom were immigrants, English language learners, or parents of children with special needs.  We discuss the key themes and variations in family experiences, giving particular attention to parental preferences and the factors that influenced their decisions, within the contexts of their employment and the early care and education programs in their communities.  We conclude with policy recommendations that can promote parental access to affordable and high quality care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pearson, Carol L.; Locke, Gretchen; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Buron, Larry
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    This report presents the findings from an exploratory study of the Housing First approach of providing permanent supportive housing to single, homeless adults with mental illness and co-occurring substance-related disorders. In recent years, Congress and the leadership of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) have encouraged the development of permanent housing for homeless people. Concurrently, there has been a shift toward committing a greater proportion of HUD McKinney-Vento Act funds toward housing as opposed to supportive services and an increase in attention toward the hardest-to-serve, chronically homeless population, a substantial number of whom are mentally ill. Because it addresses this population and its needs, the Housing First approach is currently experiencing increased attention as a method of serving this population consistent with the above-stated goals. (author abstract)

    This report presents the findings from an exploratory study of the Housing First approach of providing permanent supportive housing to single, homeless adults with mental illness and co-occurring substance-related disorders. In recent years, Congress and the leadership of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) have encouraged the development of permanent housing for homeless people. Concurrently, there has been a shift toward committing a greater proportion of HUD McKinney-Vento Act funds toward housing as opposed to supportive services and an increase in attention toward the hardest-to-serve, chronically homeless population, a substantial number of whom are mentally ill. Because it addresses this population and its needs, the Housing First approach is currently experiencing increased attention as a method of serving this population consistent with the above-stated goals. (author abstract)

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