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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Johnson-Staub, Christine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This guide aims to help states look beyond the major sources of child care and early education funding and consider alternative federal financing sources to bring comprehensive services into early childhood settings. Why? Because the sources of child care funding historically available to states have limited supply and allowable uses, and comprehensive services are critical to the success of children – especially those who are most at risk for developmental challenges and delays. The information in this guide can help states go beyond Head Start and Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds to build on early childhood systems and improve access to services for children. Partnerships expanding access to comprehensive services in child care and early education settings can take different forms. They can build program staff’s capacity to directly provide services to children, or they can bring other professionals (e.g. mental health consultants, nurses, etc.) and resources into early childhood settings to collaborate with child care and early education staff. In this...

    This guide aims to help states look beyond the major sources of child care and early education funding and consider alternative federal financing sources to bring comprehensive services into early childhood settings. Why? Because the sources of child care funding historically available to states have limited supply and allowable uses, and comprehensive services are critical to the success of children – especially those who are most at risk for developmental challenges and delays. The information in this guide can help states go beyond Head Start and Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds to build on early childhood systems and improve access to services for children. Partnerships expanding access to comprehensive services in child care and early education settings can take different forms. They can build program staff’s capacity to directly provide services to children, or they can bring other professionals (e.g. mental health consultants, nurses, etc.) and resources into early childhood settings to collaborate with child care and early education staff. In this guide, we explore partnerships using federal funding streams to provide comprehensive services to children in early childhood settings. These partnerships may be administered directly by child care and early education agencies or by partner agencies with authority over the funds.  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    As part of their monthly child support obligations, the State of Washington orders most non-custodial parents (NCPs) to enroll their dependent children in a private medical insurance plan if the NCP has access to one at a reasonable cost. Enforcing these medical support orders (medical support enforcement) is among the most complicated task performed by Washington’s Division of Child Support (DCS). For most caseworkers—in Washington known as Support Enforcement Officers (SEOs)—medical enforcement is less emphasized than the collection of cash support. This is due, in part, to the federal government’s relatively new performance measurement system, which emphasizes dollars collected for child support and has no corresponding performance measure for medical support. Over the years, the State has developed training programs and work processes designed to improve medical support enforcement. However, State officials believe most Washington SEOs still lack the special expertise needed to effectively enforce the complex obligations.

    Given these inherent complexities and barriers...

    As part of their monthly child support obligations, the State of Washington orders most non-custodial parents (NCPs) to enroll their dependent children in a private medical insurance plan if the NCP has access to one at a reasonable cost. Enforcing these medical support orders (medical support enforcement) is among the most complicated task performed by Washington’s Division of Child Support (DCS). For most caseworkers—in Washington known as Support Enforcement Officers (SEOs)—medical enforcement is less emphasized than the collection of cash support. This is due, in part, to the federal government’s relatively new performance measurement system, which emphasizes dollars collected for child support and has no corresponding performance measure for medical support. Over the years, the State has developed training programs and work processes designed to improve medical support enforcement. However, State officials believe most Washington SEOs still lack the special expertise needed to effectively enforce the complex obligations.

    Given these inherent complexities and barriers that face medical support enforcement, Washington’s IV-D officials have long considered devoting a special and separate effort to medical support enforcement. Broadly, this report’s purpose is to describe Washington’s efforts to address medical support enforcement and analyze initial results. (Edited author introduction)

     

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