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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Patton, Deleena; Liu, Qinghau; Lucenko, Barbara; Felver, Barbara; Sharkova, Irina V.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Early Childhood Intervention and Prevention Services (ECLIPSE) program serves children ages zero to five years old who are at risk of child abuse and neglect and may be experiencing behavioral health issues due to exposure to complex trauma. This report uses a statistical risk profile based on the characteristics of the Childhaven ECLIPSE population to estimate the potential population of eligible children statewide. We find that there are several thousand children statewide with family risk characteristics comparable to children currently served by the ECLIPSE program. (Author abstract) 

    The Early Childhood Intervention and Prevention Services (ECLIPSE) program serves children ages zero to five years old who are at risk of child abuse and neglect and may be experiencing behavioral health issues due to exposure to complex trauma. This report uses a statistical risk profile based on the characteristics of the Childhaven ECLIPSE population to estimate the potential population of eligible children statewide. We find that there are several thousand children statewide with family risk characteristics comparable to children currently served by the ECLIPSE program. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Allegretto, Sylvia; Godoey, Anna ; Nadler, Carl ; Reich, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In recent years, a new wave of state and local activity has transformed minimum wage policy in the U.S. As of August 2018, ten large cities and seven states have enacted minimum wage policies in the $12 to $15 range. Dozens of smaller cities and counties have also enacted wage standards in this range. These higher minimum wages, which are being phased in gradually, will cover well over 20 percent of the U.S. workforce. With a substantial number of additional cities and states poised to soon enact similar policies, a large portion of the U.S. labor market will be held to a higher wage standard than has been typical over the past 50 years.

    These minimum wage levels substantially exceed the previous peak in the federal minimum wage, which reached just under $10 (in today’s dollars) in the late 1960s. As a result, the new policies will increase pay directly for 15 to 30 percent of the workforce in these cities and as much as 40 to 50 percent of the workforce in some industries and regions. By contrast, the federal and state minimum wage increases between 1984 and 2014...

    In recent years, a new wave of state and local activity has transformed minimum wage policy in the U.S. As of August 2018, ten large cities and seven states have enacted minimum wage policies in the $12 to $15 range. Dozens of smaller cities and counties have also enacted wage standards in this range. These higher minimum wages, which are being phased in gradually, will cover well over 20 percent of the U.S. workforce. With a substantial number of additional cities and states poised to soon enact similar policies, a large portion of the U.S. labor market will be held to a higher wage standard than has been typical over the past 50 years.

    These minimum wage levels substantially exceed the previous peak in the federal minimum wage, which reached just under $10 (in today’s dollars) in the late 1960s. As a result, the new policies will increase pay directly for 15 to 30 percent of the workforce in these cities and as much as 40 to 50 percent of the workforce in some industries and regions. By contrast, the federal and state minimum wage increases between 1984 and 2014 increased pay directly for less than eight percent of the applicable workforce.

    This report examines the effects of these new policies. Although minimum wage effects on employment have been much studied and debated, this new wave of higher minimum wages attains levels beyond the evidential reach of most previous studies. Moreover, city-level policies might have effects that differ from those of state and federal policies. Yet, most of the empirical studies of minimum wages focus on the state and federal-level policies. The literature on the effects of city-level minimum wages is much smaller. Our report helps fill these gaps. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Anzelone, Caitlin; Dechausay, Nadine; Alemany, Xavier
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted 15 randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions across eight states, in the domains of work support, child support, and child care. BIAS used a systematic approach called “behavioral diagnosis and design” to develop the interventions and their associated materials. This process involved identifying problems that were appropriate for behavioral interventions, diagnosing the underlying behavioral reasons for each problem, designing interventions, and conducting rigorous tests to determine whether the interventions improved outcomes. The Behavioral Interventions Materials Compendium contains all of the written materials that the project designed and tested as part of those interventions. The compendium is arranged by program area domain, site/agency, and type of intervention. Each section begins with a one-page summary of the particular intervention that was implemented, followed by a list of the printed materials for that intervention and copies of the materials themselves. (Author...

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted 15 randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions across eight states, in the domains of work support, child support, and child care. BIAS used a systematic approach called “behavioral diagnosis and design” to develop the interventions and their associated materials. This process involved identifying problems that were appropriate for behavioral interventions, diagnosing the underlying behavioral reasons for each problem, designing interventions, and conducting rigorous tests to determine whether the interventions improved outcomes. The Behavioral Interventions Materials Compendium contains all of the written materials that the project designed and tested as part of those interventions. The compendium is arranged by program area domain, site/agency, and type of intervention. Each section begins with a one-page summary of the particular intervention that was implemented, followed by a list of the printed materials for that intervention and copies of the materials themselves. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Otten, Jennifer J.; Getts, Katherine; Althauser, Anne; Buszkiewicz, James; Jardim, Ekaterina; Hill, Heather D.; Romich, Jennifer; Allard, Scott W.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    In this article, we examine the impact of Seattle’s $15 minimum wage on the local child care sector. Our mixed methods study answers two key research questions: How is Seattle’s minimum wage ordinance affecting wages paid in the child care sector? Given these changes in wages, how does it appear that child care centers are responding to rising labor costs? To answer these questions, we analyzed three datasets: (1) state administrative data on approximately 200 Seattle-based child care businesses from 2014 to 2016; (2) an employer survey conducted annually from 2015 to 2017 of 41 child care centers impacted by the policy; and (3) in-depth interviews of 15 Seattle child care center directors. (Edited author introduction)

    In this article, we examine the impact of Seattle’s $15 minimum wage on the local child care sector. Our mixed methods study answers two key research questions: How is Seattle’s minimum wage ordinance affecting wages paid in the child care sector? Given these changes in wages, how does it appear that child care centers are responding to rising labor costs? To answer these questions, we analyzed three datasets: (1) state administrative data on approximately 200 Seattle-based child care businesses from 2014 to 2016; (2) an employer survey conducted annually from 2015 to 2017 of 41 child care centers impacted by the policy; and (3) in-depth interviews of 15 Seattle child care center directors. (Edited author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Romich, Jennifer; Long, Mark; Allard, Scott; Althauser, Anne
    Reference Type: Conference Paper, Dataset
    Year: 2018

    This paper describes a uniquely comprehensive database constructed from merged state administrative data.  State Unemployment Insurance (UI) systems provide an important source of data for understanding employment effects of policy interventions but have also lack several key types of information: personal demographics, non-earnings income, and household associations.  With UI data, researchers can show overall earnings or employment trends or policy impacts, but cannot distinguish whether these trends or impacts differ by race or gender, how they affect families and children, or whether total income or other measure of well-being change. This paper describes a uniquely comprehensive new administrative dataset, the Washington Merged Longitudinal Administrative Database (WMLAD), created by University of Washington researchers to examine distributional and household economic effects of the Seattle $15 minimum wage ordinance, an intervention that more than doubled the federal minimum wage.

    WMLAD augments UI data with state administrative voter, licensing, social service,...

    This paper describes a uniquely comprehensive database constructed from merged state administrative data.  State Unemployment Insurance (UI) systems provide an important source of data for understanding employment effects of policy interventions but have also lack several key types of information: personal demographics, non-earnings income, and household associations.  With UI data, researchers can show overall earnings or employment trends or policy impacts, but cannot distinguish whether these trends or impacts differ by race or gender, how they affect families and children, or whether total income or other measure of well-being change. This paper describes a uniquely comprehensive new administrative dataset, the Washington Merged Longitudinal Administrative Database (WMLAD), created by University of Washington researchers to examine distributional and household economic effects of the Seattle $15 minimum wage ordinance, an intervention that more than doubled the federal minimum wage.

    WMLAD augments UI data with state administrative voter, licensing, social service, income transfer, and vital statistics records. The union set of all individuals who appear in any of these agency datasets will provide a near-census of state residents and will augment UI records with information on age, sex, race/ethnicity, public assistance receipt, and household membership. In this paper, we describe 1.) our relationship with the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services that permits this data access and allows construction of this dataset using restricted personal identifiers; 2.) the merging and construction process, including imputing race and ethnicity and constructing quasi-households from address co-location; and 3.) planned benchmarking and analysis work. (Author abstract)

     

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