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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Murphy, Lauren; Zief, Susan; Hulsey, Lara
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Introduction

    This brief summarizes key characteristics of programs funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) that reported at least half of the youth they served were adjudicated youth. PREP, which aims to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors, is administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Funding is awarded to states and territories through formula grants (State PREP), and through a competitive process to tribes and tribal entities (Tribal PREP) and to direct service providers in states and territories that did not take State PREP funding (Competitive PREP).

    Purpose

    This brief is one in a series that will inform stakeholders and the public about the PREP program.

    Key Findings and Highlights

    Seventy-two programs across 24 states and territories reported primarily serving adjudicated youth. These...

    Introduction

    This brief summarizes key characteristics of programs funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) that reported at least half of the youth they served were adjudicated youth. PREP, which aims to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors, is administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Funding is awarded to states and territories through formula grants (State PREP), and through a competitive process to tribes and tribal entities (Tribal PREP) and to direct service providers in states and territories that did not take State PREP funding (Competitive PREP).

    Purpose

    This brief is one in a series that will inform stakeholders and the public about the PREP program.

    Key Findings and Highlights

    Seventy-two programs across 24 states and territories reported primarily serving adjudicated youth. These programs served about 8,000 youth each year, largely through juvenile detention centers. Most youth in these programs reported being White or Black or African American, and most were ages 15 to 18. About three-quarters of youth reported being sexually active before entering the program. After PREP, more than one-third of the youth in these programs reported they were less likely to have sex in the next six months, and a large majority reported they were more likely to use condoms and birth control if they have sex.

    Methods

    PREP grantees submit performance measures data to ACF each year. These findings are based on performance measures data submitted by State PREP, Tribal PREP, and Competitive PREP grantees for the 2014–2015 reporting period. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Needels, Karen; Nicholson, Walter; Lee, Joanne; Hock, Heinrich
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Great Recession and the time period following it were characterized by the longest average unemployment durations seen since World War II. To support unemployed workers, supplemental Unemployment Compensation (UC) legislation was passed, and, in conjunction with benefits available during non-recessionary times, offered up to 99 weeks of UC benefits to eligible recipients in some states. This represented the longest potential duration of benefits in the history of the UC system. This study examines the extent to which recipients collected all of the benefits to which they were entitled ("exhausting" their benefits) and assesses the outcomes experienced by those who exhausted their entitlements relative to (1) recipients who did not exhaust all of the benefits to which they were entitled and (2) UC non-recipients.

    The analyses used survey and administrative data from 10 states on UC recipients who filed claims from January 2008 through September 2009, as well as data from the Displaced Worker Supplement to the Current Population Survey. Several important...

    The Great Recession and the time period following it were characterized by the longest average unemployment durations seen since World War II. To support unemployed workers, supplemental Unemployment Compensation (UC) legislation was passed, and, in conjunction with benefits available during non-recessionary times, offered up to 99 weeks of UC benefits to eligible recipients in some states. This represented the longest potential duration of benefits in the history of the UC system. This study examines the extent to which recipients collected all of the benefits to which they were entitled ("exhausting" their benefits) and assesses the outcomes experienced by those who exhausted their entitlements relative to (1) recipients who did not exhaust all of the benefits to which they were entitled and (2) UC non-recipients.

    The analyses used survey and administrative data from 10 states on UC recipients who filed claims from January 2008 through September 2009, as well as data from the Displaced Worker Supplement to the Current Population Survey. Several important findings are noted. Twenty-six percent of recipients—recipients who collected benefits from only one claim during a three-year period—exhausted all of the UC benefits to which they were entitled. Overall, these exhaustees collected an average of 87 weeks of benefits compared to 28 weeks of benefits for non-exhaustees. Four to six years after their initial claims, and compared to non-exhaustees, exhaustees were less likely to be employed and more likely to be out of the labor force.

    They also experienced greater losses in household income and had higher rates of participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Social Security retirement, and disability-related income support programs. Relative to recipients with long jobless spells, non-recipients with long jobless spells were less likely to become reemployed in the subsequent few years following their layoff and had lower household incomes. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Shattuck, Rachel M.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

  • Individual Author: Center for Applied Behavioral Science
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    To explore further the potential of behavioral science to improve social programs, the federal government’s Administration for Children and Families (ACF) has launched some of the broadest and most rigorous applied behavioral science projects yet: Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS), Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS), and BIAS Next Generation. The Center for Applied Behavioral Science, a unit of the social policy research firm MDRC, is leading evaluation and technical assistance for all these projects, which are funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation and the Office of Child Support Enforcement, both at ACF within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. What follows is a discussion of some of the findings from the research so far. (Author abstract)

    To explore further the potential of behavioral science to improve social programs, the federal government’s Administration for Children and Families (ACF) has launched some of the broadest and most rigorous applied behavioral science projects yet: Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS), Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS), and BIAS Next Generation. The Center for Applied Behavioral Science, a unit of the social policy research firm MDRC, is leading evaluation and technical assistance for all these projects, which are funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation and the Office of Child Support Enforcement, both at ACF within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. What follows is a discussion of some of the findings from the research so far. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2016

    In the Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS) demonstration project, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) has competitively awarded grants to seven states and the District of Columbia to better understand individuals' behavior and decision-making ability when it comes to participating in the child support program.The five-year demonstration is exploring the potential relevance and application of behavioral economics principles to child support services, focusing on areas such as modification of orders and early engagement in the child support establishment process.

    The project launched on September 30, 2014, and builds on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Ohio, Texas and Washington's child support programs participated in BIAS and showed promising results. The eight sites participating in BICS are California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Ohio, Texas, Vermont, and Washington. (Author...

    In the Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS) demonstration project, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) has competitively awarded grants to seven states and the District of Columbia to better understand individuals' behavior and decision-making ability when it comes to participating in the child support program.The five-year demonstration is exploring the potential relevance and application of behavioral economics principles to child support services, focusing on areas such as modification of orders and early engagement in the child support establishment process.

    The project launched on September 30, 2014, and builds on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Ohio, Texas and Washington's child support programs participated in BIAS and showed promising results. The eight sites participating in BICS are California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Ohio, Texas, Vermont, and Washington. (Author introduction)

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