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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Murphy, Lauren; Zief, Susan; Hulsey, Lara
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Introduction

    This brief summarizes key characteristics of programs funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) that reported at least half of the youth they served were adjudicated youth. PREP, which aims to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors, is administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Funding is awarded to states and territories through formula grants (State PREP), and through a competitive process to tribes and tribal entities (Tribal PREP) and to direct service providers in states and territories that did not take State PREP funding (Competitive PREP).

    Purpose

    This brief is one in a series that will inform stakeholders and the public about the PREP program.

    Key Findings and Highlights

    Seventy-two programs across 24 states and territories reported primarily serving adjudicated youth. These...

    Introduction

    This brief summarizes key characteristics of programs funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) that reported at least half of the youth they served were adjudicated youth. PREP, which aims to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors, is administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Funding is awarded to states and territories through formula grants (State PREP), and through a competitive process to tribes and tribal entities (Tribal PREP) and to direct service providers in states and territories that did not take State PREP funding (Competitive PREP).

    Purpose

    This brief is one in a series that will inform stakeholders and the public about the PREP program.

    Key Findings and Highlights

    Seventy-two programs across 24 states and territories reported primarily serving adjudicated youth. These programs served about 8,000 youth each year, largely through juvenile detention centers. Most youth in these programs reported being White or Black or African American, and most were ages 15 to 18. About three-quarters of youth reported being sexually active before entering the program. After PREP, more than one-third of the youth in these programs reported they were less likely to have sex in the next six months, and a large majority reported they were more likely to use condoms and birth control if they have sex.

    Methods

    PREP grantees submit performance measures data to ACF each year. These findings are based on performance measures data submitted by State PREP, Tribal PREP, and Competitive PREP grantees for the 2014–2015 reporting period. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Goesling, Brian; Alamillo, Julia
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    This brief provides five practical tips for healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) practitioners interested in teaching HMRE in high schools. The tips are primarily for HMRE practitioners developing a school-based program for the first time, but they also have use for practitioners looking to improve or expand an existing school-based program. The tips help address a current need for research and information on HMRE programs for youth (Scott et al. 2017). From 2011 to 2015, about half the participants served by HMRE grants from the Office of Family Assistance were under age 18 (Scott et al. 2017). However, most research on HMRE programming focuses on adult couples in existing, committed relationships (Hawkins 2017). The tips draw on data from multiple sources. The main source is a relationship survey conducted with primarily 9th grade students in two Atlanta-area high schools. The survey is part of the Strengthening Relationship Education and Marriage Services (STREAMS) evaluation conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Public Strategies, for the U.S...

    This brief provides five practical tips for healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) practitioners interested in teaching HMRE in high schools. The tips are primarily for HMRE practitioners developing a school-based program for the first time, but they also have use for practitioners looking to improve or expand an existing school-based program. The tips help address a current need for research and information on HMRE programs for youth (Scott et al. 2017). From 2011 to 2015, about half the participants served by HMRE grants from the Office of Family Assistance were under age 18 (Scott et al. 2017). However, most research on HMRE programming focuses on adult couples in existing, committed relationships (Hawkins 2017). The tips draw on data from multiple sources. The main source is a relationship survey conducted with primarily 9th grade students in two Atlanta-area high schools. The survey is part of the Strengthening Relationship Education and Marriage Services (STREAMS) evaluation conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Public Strategies, for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The STREAMS evaluation focuses on HMRE programs funded by the Office of Family Assistance within the Administration for Children and Families at DHHS. A more detailed description of the evaluation and survey respondents appears at the end of the brief. To make the tips broadly relevant for students nationwide, the brief also draws on findings from relevant national surveys of adolescents and adults. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2016

    In the Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS) demonstration project, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) has competitively awarded grants to seven states and the District of Columbia to better understand individuals' behavior and decision-making ability when it comes to participating in the child support program.The five-year demonstration is exploring the potential relevance and application of behavioral economics principles to child support services, focusing on areas such as modification of orders and early engagement in the child support establishment process.

    The project launched on September 30, 2014, and builds on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Ohio, Texas and Washington's child support programs participated in BIAS and showed promising results. The eight sites participating in BICS are California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Ohio, Texas, Vermont, and Washington. (Author...

    In the Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS) demonstration project, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) has competitively awarded grants to seven states and the District of Columbia to better understand individuals' behavior and decision-making ability when it comes to participating in the child support program.The five-year demonstration is exploring the potential relevance and application of behavioral economics principles to child support services, focusing on areas such as modification of orders and early engagement in the child support establishment process.

    The project launched on September 30, 2014, and builds on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Ohio, Texas and Washington's child support programs participated in BIAS and showed promising results. The eight sites participating in BICS are California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Ohio, Texas, Vermont, and Washington. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: TANF Faith-Based and Community Organizations Initiative
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    This cross-site analysis examines all 8 of the exemplary FBCO-TANF partnerships described in the project’s case studies, by drawing out important findings related to volunteer management, organizational infrastructure, inter-agency communication, and place-based strategies. Moreover, the 14-page report articulates some of the leading reasons a TANF agency would want to partner with an FBCO, and it describes how effective partnerships can emerge. (author abstract)

    This cross-site analysis examines all 8 of the exemplary FBCO-TANF partnerships described in the project’s case studies, by drawing out important findings related to volunteer management, organizational infrastructure, inter-agency communication, and place-based strategies. Moreover, the 14-page report articulates some of the leading reasons a TANF agency would want to partner with an FBCO, and it describes how effective partnerships can emerge. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schott, Liz
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2010

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2010 NAWRS Workshop discusses the TANF Emergency Fund and homelessness.

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2010 NAWRS Workshop discusses the TANF Emergency Fund and homelessness.

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