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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Early, Diane; Maxwell, Kelly; Blasberg, Amy; Miranda, Brenda; Orfali, Nadia; Li, Weilin; Bultinck, Erin; Gebhart, Tracy; Mason, Rihana S.; Bingham, Gary E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Quality Rated is Georgia’s systematic approach to assessing, improving, and communicating the level of quality in early care and education programs. In Quality Rated, center-based programs and family child care learning homes (FCCLHs) apply to receive a star rating based on a combination of an online portfolio and classroom observations of global quality using standardized tools called the Environment Rating Scales (ERS). 

    This report is the fourth and final in a series presenting findings from the Quality Rated Validation Project (see the pull-out box on the next page for key findings from the first three reports). As part of Georgia’s Race to the Top—Early Learning Challenge grant, Georgia’s Department of Early Care and Learning (DECAL) invested in evaluating Quality Rated. One part of that evaluation is the Quality Rated Validation Project led by Child Trends in partnership with Georgia State University.

    The objectives of the Quality Rated Validation Project were to support Quality Rated leaders in future implementation and revision by providing them with...

    Quality Rated is Georgia’s systematic approach to assessing, improving, and communicating the level of quality in early care and education programs. In Quality Rated, center-based programs and family child care learning homes (FCCLHs) apply to receive a star rating based on a combination of an online portfolio and classroom observations of global quality using standardized tools called the Environment Rating Scales (ERS). 

    This report is the fourth and final in a series presenting findings from the Quality Rated Validation Project (see the pull-out box on the next page for key findings from the first three reports). As part of Georgia’s Race to the Top—Early Learning Challenge grant, Georgia’s Department of Early Care and Learning (DECAL) invested in evaluating Quality Rated. One part of that evaluation is the Quality Rated Validation Project led by Child Trends in partnership with Georgia State University.

    The objectives of the Quality Rated Validation Project were to support Quality Rated leaders in future implementation and revision by providing them with information about (1) their administrative data system and how the ratings are functioning, (2) the extent to which the ratings are accurate and meaningful indicators of quality, and (3) the extent to which the ratings are linked to children’s development and learning. (Excerpt from introduction) 

  • Individual Author: Shinn, Marybeth; Gubits, Daniel ; Dunton, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

    This brief builds on previous research by describing the behavioral health problems reported by 2,020 parents—including some fathers—at the outset of a shelter stay with their children and the association of these problems with parents’ prior experiences. For the purposes of this brief, behavioral health includes psychological distress, alcohol dependence, drug abuse, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).The brief then looks at changes in the parents’ behavioral health problems over the next 37 months and how those changes were related to housing stability following the episode of homelessness. (...

    The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

    This brief builds on previous research by describing the behavioral health problems reported by 2,020 parents—including some fathers—at the outset of a shelter stay with their children and the association of these problems with parents’ prior experiences. For the purposes of this brief, behavioral health includes psychological distress, alcohol dependence, drug abuse, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).The brief then looks at changes in the parents’ behavioral health problems over the next 37 months and how those changes were related to housing stability following the episode of homelessness. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Ports, Katie A.; Rostad, Whitney L.; Luo, Feijun; Putnam, Michelle; Zurick, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Housing instability is a risk factor for child abuse and neglect (CAN). Thus, policies that increase availability of affordable housing may reduce CAN rates. The Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program is the largest affordable housing policy initiative in the country. This study used fixed-effects models to estimate the relationship between LIHTC units and county-level CAN reports in Georgia from 2005 to 2015, controlling for county demographic characteristics. One-way fixed-effects models (including only county fixed-effects) demonstrated significant negative associations between number of LIHTC units and substantiated cases of CAN and total reports of sexual abuse. In two-way fixed-effects models (including county and year fixed-effects), LIHTC units were not associated with any of the outcomes. The findings are subject to limitations, including voluntary provision of CAN data, suppressed data for counties with <10 CAN cases, and no assessment of the quality of LIHTC neighborhood. LIHTC may be a promising prevention strategy, but more research is needed. (Author...

    Housing instability is a risk factor for child abuse and neglect (CAN). Thus, policies that increase availability of affordable housing may reduce CAN rates. The Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program is the largest affordable housing policy initiative in the country. This study used fixed-effects models to estimate the relationship between LIHTC units and county-level CAN reports in Georgia from 2005 to 2015, controlling for county demographic characteristics. One-way fixed-effects models (including only county fixed-effects) demonstrated significant negative associations between number of LIHTC units and substantiated cases of CAN and total reports of sexual abuse. In two-way fixed-effects models (including county and year fixed-effects), LIHTC units were not associated with any of the outcomes. The findings are subject to limitations, including voluntary provision of CAN data, suppressed data for counties with <10 CAN cases, and no assessment of the quality of LIHTC neighborhood. LIHTC may be a promising prevention strategy, but more research is needed. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Bouris, Erica
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This presentation draws on: 1) administrative program data collected from over 700 individuals participating in International Rescue Committee career programs (workforce development programs that are explicitly focused on supporting refugees – regardless of previous professional experience or educational background – to move into higher-skill, higher-wage jobs); 2) in-depth, semi-structured interviews with more than 40 refugees from nearly a dozen countries that have participated in International Rescue Committee career programs and; 3) interviews with nearly 20 program staff and key stakeholders that are implementing refugee-serving career programs. The paper examines several key issues including wage and job progression outcomes among IRC career program participants, issues and patterns surrounding enrollment in and attainment of industry-aligned credentials, variations among program model and intervention approaches, and variations in client engagement and outcomes in sector-specific programs that are aligned to key industries. The breadth of the administrative program...

    This presentation draws on: 1) administrative program data collected from over 700 individuals participating in International Rescue Committee career programs (workforce development programs that are explicitly focused on supporting refugees – regardless of previous professional experience or educational background – to move into higher-skill, higher-wage jobs); 2) in-depth, semi-structured interviews with more than 40 refugees from nearly a dozen countries that have participated in International Rescue Committee career programs and; 3) interviews with nearly 20 program staff and key stakeholders that are implementing refugee-serving career programs. The paper examines several key issues including wage and job progression outcomes among IRC career program participants, issues and patterns surrounding enrollment in and attainment of industry-aligned credentials, variations among program model and intervention approaches, and variations in client engagement and outcomes in sector-specific programs that are aligned to key industries. The breadth of the administrative program data – it includes refugees accessing career programming in more than ten cities, refugees that come from more than two dozen nations, refugees with tremendous variation in educational background, and refugees engaged in career programming aligned with a wide variety of industry sectors – affords a unique opportunity to consider variations in refugee outcomes and experiences. The inclusion of qualitative interviews (clients and staff/stakeholders) adds depth and context to this analysis. Further, the paper presents some initial suggestions on how findings from this analysis could inform key workforce development policy decisions at the federal, state, and local level. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Needels, Karen; Nicholson, Walter; Lee, Joanne; Hock, Heinrich
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Great Recession and the time period following it were characterized by the longest average unemployment durations seen since World War II. To support unemployed workers, supplemental Unemployment Compensation (UC) legislation was passed, and, in conjunction with benefits available during non-recessionary times, offered up to 99 weeks of UC benefits to eligible recipients in some states. This represented the longest potential duration of benefits in the history of the UC system. This study examines the extent to which recipients collected all of the benefits to which they were entitled ("exhausting" their benefits) and assesses the outcomes experienced by those who exhausted their entitlements relative to (1) recipients who did not exhaust all of the benefits to which they were entitled and (2) UC non-recipients.

    The analyses used survey and administrative data from 10 states on UC recipients who filed claims from January 2008 through September 2009, as well as data from the Displaced Worker Supplement to the Current Population Survey. Several important...

    The Great Recession and the time period following it were characterized by the longest average unemployment durations seen since World War II. To support unemployed workers, supplemental Unemployment Compensation (UC) legislation was passed, and, in conjunction with benefits available during non-recessionary times, offered up to 99 weeks of UC benefits to eligible recipients in some states. This represented the longest potential duration of benefits in the history of the UC system. This study examines the extent to which recipients collected all of the benefits to which they were entitled ("exhausting" their benefits) and assesses the outcomes experienced by those who exhausted their entitlements relative to (1) recipients who did not exhaust all of the benefits to which they were entitled and (2) UC non-recipients.

    The analyses used survey and administrative data from 10 states on UC recipients who filed claims from January 2008 through September 2009, as well as data from the Displaced Worker Supplement to the Current Population Survey. Several important findings are noted. Twenty-six percent of recipients—recipients who collected benefits from only one claim during a three-year period—exhausted all of the UC benefits to which they were entitled. Overall, these exhaustees collected an average of 87 weeks of benefits compared to 28 weeks of benefits for non-exhaustees. Four to six years after their initial claims, and compared to non-exhaustees, exhaustees were less likely to be employed and more likely to be out of the labor force.

    They also experienced greater losses in household income and had higher rates of participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Social Security retirement, and disability-related income support programs. Relative to recipients with long jobless spells, non-recipients with long jobless spells were less likely to become reemployed in the subsequent few years following their layoff and had lower household incomes. (Author abstract)

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