Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Benton, Amanda; Dunton, Lauren; Khadduri, Jill; Walton, Douglas
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Cho, Junhan; Terris, Darcey D.; Glisson, Rachael E.; Bae, Dayoung; Brown, Anita
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    The present study investigated the influence of multi-level determinants on home visiting participation outcomes. Home visiting participation was assessed by: (1) duration of participation (i.e., retention); (2) number of home visits completed (i.e., dosage), and (3) number of home visits completed divided by the duration of participation (i.e., intensity). The sample consisted of 1024 mothers (mean age 22.89 years) who participated in home visiting funded through Georgia’s Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we investigated both family- and community-level characteristics associated with participation outcomes. Mothers (primary caregivers) were less likely to be retained in the program and more likely to have received fewer visits if they were not living with a main romantic partner or if their household incomes were below poverty level. The mothers were more likely to be actively engaged if their primary language was not English or if their child was relatively younger at enrollment. At the community level,...

    The present study investigated the influence of multi-level determinants on home visiting participation outcomes. Home visiting participation was assessed by: (1) duration of participation (i.e., retention); (2) number of home visits completed (i.e., dosage), and (3) number of home visits completed divided by the duration of participation (i.e., intensity). The sample consisted of 1024 mothers (mean age 22.89 years) who participated in home visiting funded through Georgia’s Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we investigated both family- and community-level characteristics associated with participation outcomes. Mothers (primary caregivers) were less likely to be retained in the program and more likely to have received fewer visits if they were not living with a main romantic partner or if their household incomes were below poverty level. The mothers were more likely to be actively engaged if their primary language was not English or if their child was relatively younger at enrollment. At the community level, after controlling family characteristics, living in a disadvantaged community (characterized by economic deprivation and elevated child health/safety risks) was associated with shorter and less intense program participation. These findings demonstrate that barriers to active engagement in home visiting programs persisted at multiple ecological levels. Explicitly considering the complexity of the communities in which home visiting programs are implemented may allow for more equitable allocations and expectations in future funding and performance measurement.(Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Busso, Matias; Gregory, Jesse; Kline, Patrick
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    This article empirically assesses the incidence and efficiency of Round 1 of the federal urban Empowerment Zone (EZ) program using confidential microdata from the Decennial Census and the Longitudinal Business Database. Using rejected and future applicants to the EZ program as controls, we find that EZ designation substantially increased employment in zone neighborhoods and generated wage increases for local workers without corresponding increases in population or the local cost of living. The results suggest the efficiency costs of the first round o EZs were relatively modest. (author abstract)

    This article empirically assesses the incidence and efficiency of Round 1 of the federal urban Empowerment Zone (EZ) program using confidential microdata from the Decennial Census and the Longitudinal Business Database. Using rejected and future applicants to the EZ program as controls, we find that EZ designation substantially increased employment in zone neighborhoods and generated wage increases for local workers without corresponding increases in population or the local cost of living. The results suggest the efficiency costs of the first round o EZs were relatively modest. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Annie E. Casey Foundation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    On August 18-20, 2004, teams from three Casey Making Connections sites in Atlanta, Georgia; Louisville, Kentucky; and Oakland, California participated in a peer technical assistance match with staff and partners of the Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation in San Diego, California. The visiting Casey sites are all at different stages of developing economic revitalization plans and are particularly interested in assuring that residents play a leadership role in their efforts. The purpose: to exchange information, experience, and ideas about community ownership in neighborhood revitalization projects. (Author abstract)

    On August 18-20, 2004, teams from three Casey Making Connections sites in Atlanta, Georgia; Louisville, Kentucky; and Oakland, California participated in a peer technical assistance match with staff and partners of the Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation in San Diego, California. The visiting Casey sites are all at different stages of developing economic revitalization plans and are particularly interested in assuring that residents play a leadership role in their efforts. The purpose: to exchange information, experience, and ideas about community ownership in neighborhood revitalization projects. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Annie E. Casey Foundation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    Atlanta is an Annie E. Casey Foundation civic site — a city with Casey connections and long-term commitments. Neighborhoods Count is about Neighborhood Planning Unit V (NPU-V), a poor section of six neighborhoods outside Atlanta. This report presented baseline data and resident stories as a starting point to measure progress toward improving resident health, safety, education and livelihoods. The Annie E. Casey Foundation hoped this information would attract new partners and investments to expand its NPU-V family-strengthening, neighborhood transformation work. (author abstract)

    Atlanta is an Annie E. Casey Foundation civic site — a city with Casey connections and long-term commitments. Neighborhoods Count is about Neighborhood Planning Unit V (NPU-V), a poor section of six neighborhoods outside Atlanta. This report presented baseline data and resident stories as a starting point to measure progress toward improving resident health, safety, education and livelihoods. The Annie E. Casey Foundation hoped this information would attract new partners and investments to expand its NPU-V family-strengthening, neighborhood transformation work. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2001 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations