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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Cho, Junhan; Terris, Darcey D.; Glisson, Rachael E.; Bae, Dayoung; Brown, Anita
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    The present study investigated the influence of multi-level determinants on home visiting participation outcomes. Home visiting participation was assessed by: (1) duration of participation (i.e., retention); (2) number of home visits completed (i.e., dosage), and (3) number of home visits completed divided by the duration of participation (i.e., intensity). The sample consisted of 1024 mothers (mean age 22.89 years) who participated in home visiting funded through Georgia’s Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we investigated both family- and community-level characteristics associated with participation outcomes. Mothers (primary caregivers) were less likely to be retained in the program and more likely to have received fewer visits if they were not living with a main romantic partner or if their household incomes were below poverty level. The mothers were more likely to be actively engaged if their primary language was not English or if their child was relatively younger at enrollment. At the community level,...

    The present study investigated the influence of multi-level determinants on home visiting participation outcomes. Home visiting participation was assessed by: (1) duration of participation (i.e., retention); (2) number of home visits completed (i.e., dosage), and (3) number of home visits completed divided by the duration of participation (i.e., intensity). The sample consisted of 1024 mothers (mean age 22.89 years) who participated in home visiting funded through Georgia’s Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we investigated both family- and community-level characteristics associated with participation outcomes. Mothers (primary caregivers) were less likely to be retained in the program and more likely to have received fewer visits if they were not living with a main romantic partner or if their household incomes were below poverty level. The mothers were more likely to be actively engaged if their primary language was not English or if their child was relatively younger at enrollment. At the community level, after controlling family characteristics, living in a disadvantaged community (characterized by economic deprivation and elevated child health/safety risks) was associated with shorter and less intense program participation. These findings demonstrate that barriers to active engagement in home visiting programs persisted at multiple ecological levels. Explicitly considering the complexity of the communities in which home visiting programs are implemented may allow for more equitable allocations and expectations in future funding and performance measurement.(Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Duncan, Greg J.; Gennetian, Lisa; Morris, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    This article contributes to the literature on parental self-sufficiency and child well-being in two ways. First, we bring a novel interdisciplinary perspective to formulating hypotheses about the pathways by which policy-induced changes in the environments in which children are embedded, both within and outside the home, facilitate or harm children’s development. These hypotheses help to organize the contradictory assertions regarding child impacts that have surrounded the debate over welfare reform. Second, we draw on a set of policy experiments to understand the effects of reforms targeting parents’ self-sufficiency on both parents and their children. The random-assignment design of these evaluations provides an unusually strong basis for identifying conditions under which policy-induced increases in employment among low-income and mostly single parents can help or hurt young children’s achievement. (Author introduction)

    This article contributes to the literature on parental self-sufficiency and child well-being in two ways. First, we bring a novel interdisciplinary perspective to formulating hypotheses about the pathways by which policy-induced changes in the environments in which children are embedded, both within and outside the home, facilitate or harm children’s development. These hypotheses help to organize the contradictory assertions regarding child impacts that have surrounded the debate over welfare reform. Second, we draw on a set of policy experiments to understand the effects of reforms targeting parents’ self-sufficiency on both parents and their children. The random-assignment design of these evaluations provides an unusually strong basis for identifying conditions under which policy-induced increases in employment among low-income and mostly single parents can help or hurt young children’s achievement. (Author introduction)

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