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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wadibia, Ola; Dorsey, Belva
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention highlights financial capability tools with a focus on Community Action Agencies.

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention highlights financial capability tools with a focus on Community Action Agencies.

  • Individual Author: Karas, Andrew; Lerman, Robert I.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Many Americans lack the financial knowledge to navigate the modern economy and avoid financial hardship. While information regarding the costs and benefits of financial choices is readily available, many people enter the workforce without knowing how to convert that information into sound decisionmaking. Furthermore, financial education efforts have shown mixed results, and turning classroom theory into lasting habits remains difficult.

    In this report, we explore approaches that incorporate financial education into youth apprenticeship programs. Based on interviews with more than a dozen youth apprenticeship coordinators in Wisconsin and Georgia, we find that integrated financial education is the exception in youth apprenticeship, but we find broad support for the idea that apprentices would benefit from it. (Author abstract)

    Many Americans lack the financial knowledge to navigate the modern economy and avoid financial hardship. While information regarding the costs and benefits of financial choices is readily available, many people enter the workforce without knowing how to convert that information into sound decisionmaking. Furthermore, financial education efforts have shown mixed results, and turning classroom theory into lasting habits remains difficult.

    In this report, we explore approaches that incorporate financial education into youth apprenticeship programs. Based on interviews with more than a dozen youth apprenticeship coordinators in Wisconsin and Georgia, we find that integrated financial education is the exception in youth apprenticeship, but we find broad support for the idea that apprentices would benefit from it. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2016

    In the Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS) demonstration project, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) has competitively awarded grants to seven states and the District of Columbia to better understand individuals' behavior and decision-making ability when it comes to participating in the child support program.The five-year demonstration is exploring the potential relevance and application of behavioral economics principles to child support services, focusing on areas such as modification of orders and early engagement in the child support establishment process.

    The project launched on September 30, 2014, and builds on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Ohio, Texas and Washington's child support programs participated in BIAS and showed promising results. The eight sites participating in BICS are California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Ohio, Texas, Vermont, and Washington. (Author...

    In the Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS) demonstration project, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) has competitively awarded grants to seven states and the District of Columbia to better understand individuals' behavior and decision-making ability when it comes to participating in the child support program.The five-year demonstration is exploring the potential relevance and application of behavioral economics principles to child support services, focusing on areas such as modification of orders and early engagement in the child support establishment process.

    The project launched on September 30, 2014, and builds on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Ohio, Texas and Washington's child support programs participated in BIAS and showed promising results. The eight sites participating in BICS are California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Ohio, Texas, Vermont, and Washington. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Schultz, Caroline
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS conference describes initial implementation findings from Paycheck Plus, a program for single adults without dependents composed of a work-based earnings supplement, building on the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS conference describes initial implementation findings from Paycheck Plus, a program for single adults without dependents composed of a work-based earnings supplement, building on the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Schultz, Caroline; Bernardi, Alexandra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Despite this broad support, an EITC expansion for adults without children has yet to become policy in today’s environment of budget ceilings and efforts to rein in spending. The Paycheck Plus study will inform this debate by presenting evidence on the effects of this type of policy on low-wage workers’ income and earnings. This brief, the second in a series, provides an update on the project, describing the implementation of the bonus during the first year and receipt rates during the 2015 tax season. The brief also discusses the forthcoming test of Paycheck Plus in Atlanta, Georgia, which will provide evidence of its effects in a different context from New York City. (Edited author introduction)

    Despite this broad support, an EITC expansion for adults without children has yet to become policy in today’s environment of budget ceilings and efforts to rein in spending. The Paycheck Plus study will inform this debate by presenting evidence on the effects of this type of policy on low-wage workers’ income and earnings. This brief, the second in a series, provides an update on the project, describing the implementation of the bonus during the first year and receipt rates during the 2015 tax season. The brief also discusses the forthcoming test of Paycheck Plus in Atlanta, Georgia, which will provide evidence of its effects in a different context from New York City. (Edited author introduction)

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