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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Riccio, James; Deitch, Victoria; Verma, Nandita
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The purpose of the Rent Reform Demonstration is to test an alternative to the current rent-setting system for families using housing choice vouchers (HCV). The goals of the alternative rent-setting model now being tested are to incentivize employment and reduce the complexity and burden (and, thus, the cost) of administering the rent policy, while not causing unnecessary hardship for HCV households. The study team, PHAs, and HUD collaboratively designed the alternative rent model that is being tested at four local Moving to Work (MTW) public housing agencies (PHAs) sites with 6,600 participating HCV assisted households using a rigorous random assignment design. The four participating PHAs are the District of Columbia Housing Authority, Lexington Housing Authority, Louisville Metropolitan Housing Authority, and San Antonio Housing Authority. This report provides a detailed explanation of the alternative rent model, a description of the demonstration implementation, and an outline of the preliminary baseline information and survey data that has already been gathered from the...

    The purpose of the Rent Reform Demonstration is to test an alternative to the current rent-setting system for families using housing choice vouchers (HCV). The goals of the alternative rent-setting model now being tested are to incentivize employment and reduce the complexity and burden (and, thus, the cost) of administering the rent policy, while not causing unnecessary hardship for HCV households. The study team, PHAs, and HUD collaboratively designed the alternative rent model that is being tested at four local Moving to Work (MTW) public housing agencies (PHAs) sites with 6,600 participating HCV assisted households using a rigorous random assignment design. The four participating PHAs are the District of Columbia Housing Authority, Lexington Housing Authority, Louisville Metropolitan Housing Authority, and San Antonio Housing Authority. This report provides a detailed explanation of the alternative rent model, a description of the demonstration implementation, and an outline of the preliminary baseline information and survey data that has already been gathered from the assisted families participating in the study. Future reports will assess the impact of the alternative rent model at 12 and 36 months after random assignment on employment, earnings, and hardship for the study sample and on administrative efficiencies for the PHA, provide a process evaluation of the demonstration implementation, and analyze the cost effectiveness of the new rent policy compared to the existing rent policy. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Moffitt, Robert ; Roff, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    Women who have left TANF in three cities--Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio--have an average employment rate of 63 percent after leaving welfare, a rate similar to those found in studies of welfare leavers in many other states. But this average obscures a large amount of variation across different groups of women, some of which have done much better than average and some of whom have done much worse. Women with lower levels of education, with younger children, who are in poor health, and who are themselves young have considerably lower employment rates and postwelfare income levels than women with greater levels of education, better health status, with older children, and who are older. Outcomes also differ among those leavers with a longer history of welfare dependence, a group not examined in other studies. The employment and, especially, income outcomes among these leavers are considerably worse than the average. Leavers who have been sanctioned also do much worse after leaving the rolls than those not sanctioned. These large differences in outcomes for former welfare...

    Women who have left TANF in three cities--Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio--have an average employment rate of 63 percent after leaving welfare, a rate similar to those found in studies of welfare leavers in many other states. But this average obscures a large amount of variation across different groups of women, some of which have done much better than average and some of whom have done much worse. Women with lower levels of education, with younger children, who are in poor health, and who are themselves young have considerably lower employment rates and postwelfare income levels than women with greater levels of education, better health status, with older children, and who are older. Outcomes also differ among those leavers with a longer history of welfare dependence, a group not examined in other studies. The employment and, especially, income outcomes among these leavers are considerably worse than the average. Leavers who have been sanctioned also do much worse after leaving the rolls than those not sanctioned. These large differences in outcomes for former welfare recipients should be examined by policy-makers when they consider reforms to assist those who have difficulty attaining self-sufficiency off the welfare rolls. (author introduction)