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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Holzer, Harry; Popham, Amelia; Elliott, Mark; Rolston, Howard; Weiss, Micheal
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Improving low-income students’ college completion rates is one critical means to increasing economic mobility and reducing inequality. This panel presented findings from four randomized trials demonstrating that it is possible to achieve large gains in college completion rates. The presentations also highlighted the value of combining multiple sources of high-quality data with strong research designs for causal analysis. Amelia Popham (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session, and Harry Holzer (Georgetown University) served as a discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Presenter introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Improving low-income students’ college completion rates is one critical means to increasing economic mobility and reducing inequality. This panel presented findings from four randomized trials demonstrating that it is possible to achieve large gains in college completion rates. The presentations also highlighted the value of combining multiple sources of high-quality data with strong research designs for causal analysis. Amelia Popham (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session, and Harry Holzer (Georgetown University) served as a discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Presenter introduction)

  • Individual Author: Coley, Rebekah Levine; Ribar, David; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    Economically disadvantaged mothers face numerous barriers to stable, quality employment opportunities. One barrier that has received limited attention in previous research is having a child with significant psychological or behavioral problems. Using a representative sample of low-income mothers and early adolescent children from the Three-City Study (N = 717), we assessed whether adolescents' behavior problems prospectively predicted mothers' employment status, consistency, and quality. Lagged random-effects regression models suggested that adolescents' psychological distress and delinquency inhibited the labor market success of disadvantaged mothers, although school problems were related to greater work effort among mothers. Links between labor market success and both psychological distress and delinquency differed across mothers with male and female adolescents. (author abstract)

    Economically disadvantaged mothers face numerous barriers to stable, quality employment opportunities. One barrier that has received limited attention in previous research is having a child with significant psychological or behavioral problems. Using a representative sample of low-income mothers and early adolescent children from the Three-City Study (N = 717), we assessed whether adolescents' behavior problems prospectively predicted mothers' employment status, consistency, and quality. Lagged random-effects regression models suggested that adolescents' psychological distress and delinquency inhibited the labor market success of disadvantaged mothers, although school problems were related to greater work effort among mothers. Links between labor market success and both psychological distress and delinquency differed across mothers with male and female adolescents. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gustitus, Sandra; Simmons, Melody; Waller, Margy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Changes in the location of work and residence in the last century have dramatically altered the landscape of our nation and changed the transportation needs of communities and workers. As a result, most communities now depend on private vehicle access to ensure that workers can fill and retain jobs by effectively managing the distance and travel time between work and home and access to goods and services not well served by public transit. In recent decades, policymakers have created new barriers to economic strength and employment by adopting legislation that makes license holding, and therefore access to legal driving, more tenuous—particularly for low-wage employees. In this report, we highlight promising initiatives and provide recommendations for policymakers to reduce the impact of economic license suspensions that are unrelated to driving competency and public safety. (author abstract)

    Changes in the location of work and residence in the last century have dramatically altered the landscape of our nation and changed the transportation needs of communities and workers. As a result, most communities now depend on private vehicle access to ensure that workers can fill and retain jobs by effectively managing the distance and travel time between work and home and access to goods and services not well served by public transit. In recent decades, policymakers have created new barriers to economic strength and employment by adopting legislation that makes license holding, and therefore access to legal driving, more tenuous—particularly for low-wage employees. In this report, we highlight promising initiatives and provide recommendations for policymakers to reduce the impact of economic license suspensions that are unrelated to driving competency and public safety. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meara, Ellen; Frank, Richard
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act imposed work requirements on welfare recipients. Using 1999-2001 data from Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio, we compared the labor market and welfare experience of women with four employment barriers: poor mental health, moderate to heavy drug and alcohol use, a child with a behavior problem, and a child under the age of 3. Women with poor mental health and drug and alcohol users were much less likely to move into work than other groups, and more likely to be sanctioned for noncompliance with welfare requirements in 2000-2001 as federal work participation requirements increased. (author abstract)

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act imposed work requirements on welfare recipients. Using 1999-2001 data from Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio, we compared the labor market and welfare experience of women with four employment barriers: poor mental health, moderate to heavy drug and alcohol use, a child with a behavior problem, and a child under the age of 3. Women with poor mental health and drug and alcohol users were much less likely to move into work than other groups, and more likely to be sanctioned for noncompliance with welfare requirements in 2000-2001 as federal work participation requirements increased. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Romero, Diana; Chavkin, Wendy; Wise, Paul H.; Smith, Lauren A.; Wood, Pamela R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2002

    Objectives. This study investigated whether health problems among poor mothers of chronically ill children affect their ability to obtain and maintain employment.

    Methods. Mothers of children with chronic illnesses were surveyed at clinical and welfare agency sites in San Antonio, Tex.

    Results. There were distinct health differences according to mothers’ TANF and employment status. Mothers without TANF experience reported better physical and mental health and less domestic violence and substance use than did those who had TANF experience. Those not currently working had higher rates of physical and mental health problems.

    Conclusions. Poor maternal health is associated with need for cash assistance and health insurance. Policymakers must recognize that social policies promoting employment will fail if they do not address the health needs of poor women and children. (author abstract)

    Objectives. This study investigated whether health problems among poor mothers of chronically ill children affect their ability to obtain and maintain employment.

    Methods. Mothers of children with chronic illnesses were surveyed at clinical and welfare agency sites in San Antonio, Tex.

    Results. There were distinct health differences according to mothers’ TANF and employment status. Mothers without TANF experience reported better physical and mental health and less domestic violence and substance use than did those who had TANF experience. Those not currently working had higher rates of physical and mental health problems.

    Conclusions. Poor maternal health is associated with need for cash assistance and health insurance. Policymakers must recognize that social policies promoting employment will fail if they do not address the health needs of poor women and children. (author abstract)

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