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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Yoder, Jamie R.; Brisson, Daniel; Lopez, Amy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    The effect of nonresidential father relationship characteristics on delinquency trajectories among low-income youth (N = 799) was examined using data from the Three Cities Study, a longitudinal study of mothers and their children eligible for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio. Growth curve models were employed to track delinquency trajectories and their rate of growth. Characteristics of father-child relationships (anger-alienation, trust-communication) were specified as predictors of delinquency while controlling for father involvement and family structure. Trust-communication influenced delinquency growth, but the rate of growth slowed as youth aged. Implications for programs, interventions, and policy are explored. (Author abstract)

    The effect of nonresidential father relationship characteristics on delinquency trajectories among low-income youth (N = 799) was examined using data from the Three Cities Study, a longitudinal study of mothers and their children eligible for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio. Growth curve models were employed to track delinquency trajectories and their rate of growth. Characteristics of father-child relationships (anger-alienation, trust-communication) were specified as predictors of delinquency while controlling for father involvement and family structure. Trust-communication influenced delinquency growth, but the rate of growth slowed as youth aged. Implications for programs, interventions, and policy are explored. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zaveri, Heather ; Holcomb, Pamela ; Baumgartner, Scott
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop summarizes early lessons learned from the PACT evaluation, focusing on the process study of four Responsible Fatherhood programs.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop summarizes early lessons learned from the PACT evaluation, focusing on the process study of four Responsible Fatherhood programs.

  • Individual Author: Greenberg, David M. ; Aceves, Aurelia De La Rosa; Quiroz-Becerra, M. Victoria; Greenberg, David H. ; Oppenheim, Ari
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The Jobs-Plus Public Housing Revitalization Initiative (1998-2003) was designed to raise and sustain the employment and earnings of residents of public housing developments. It had three parts: (1) employment services offered at on-site job centers, (2) changes in rent rules that provide financial incentives to work, and (3) community support for work through neighbor-to-neighbor conversations. The initiative was subject to a rigorous evaluation, which found that where implemented fully, Jobs-Plus boosted residents’ annual earnings by 16 percent, or $1,300 per year, an effect that endured seven years without abating. This report investigates how Jobs-Plus was replicated in more contemporary settings, analyzing the early implementation experiences of a community-based provider in the Bronx and the San Antonio Housing Authority in Texas, both funded by the Social Innovation Fund (SIF) of the Corporation for National and Community Service. (Author abstract)

    The Jobs-Plus Public Housing Revitalization Initiative (1998-2003) was designed to raise and sustain the employment and earnings of residents of public housing developments. It had three parts: (1) employment services offered at on-site job centers, (2) changes in rent rules that provide financial incentives to work, and (3) community support for work through neighbor-to-neighbor conversations. The initiative was subject to a rigorous evaluation, which found that where implemented fully, Jobs-Plus boosted residents’ annual earnings by 16 percent, or $1,300 per year, an effect that endured seven years without abating. This report investigates how Jobs-Plus was replicated in more contemporary settings, analyzing the early implementation experiences of a community-based provider in the Bronx and the San Antonio Housing Authority in Texas, both funded by the Social Innovation Fund (SIF) of the Corporation for National and Community Service. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cabrera, Natasha; Torres, Luis; Dion, Robin; Baumgartner, Scott
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This report describes four Responsible Fatherhood programs that focus primarily on low-income Hispanic fathers:

    1. Futuro Now from KidWorks, a partner of The East Los Angeles Community Union, in Santa Ana, California
    2. Project Fatherhood at The Children’s Institute, Inc., in Los Angeles County, California
    3. Project Padres at Imperial Valley Regional Occupational Program in Imperial County, California
    4. Responsible Fatherhood Program at Southwest Key in San Antonio, Texas

    This study provides information about how these federally funded programs are implemented in a culturally relevant way and insights into the participating fathers’ program experiences. (author abstract)

    This report describes four Responsible Fatherhood programs that focus primarily on low-income Hispanic fathers:

    1. Futuro Now from KidWorks, a partner of The East Los Angeles Community Union, in Santa Ana, California
    2. Project Fatherhood at The Children’s Institute, Inc., in Los Angeles County, California
    3. Project Padres at Imperial Valley Regional Occupational Program in Imperial County, California
    4. Responsible Fatherhood Program at Southwest Key in San Antonio, Texas

    This study provides information about how these federally funded programs are implemented in a culturally relevant way and insights into the participating fathers’ program experiences. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Speirs, Katherine E.; Vesely, Colleen K.; Roy, Kevin
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Recent research has drawn attention to the deleterious effects of instability on child development. In particular, child care instability may make it hard for children to form secure attachments to their care providers which may have a negative impact on their development and school readiness. These effects seem to be heightened for low-income children and families. However, there remains a lack of clarity regarding how and why low-income mothers make changes to their child care arrangements. Using ethnographic data from Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three City Study, this study explored 36 low-income mothers' experiences of child care instability and stability and the factors that promoted each. We identified four kinds of child care transitions: planned, averted, failed, and forced. Financial resources, transportation and the availability of care during the hours that mothers work were important for helping mothers find and maintain preferred care arrangements. Our findings have implications for research on child care instability as well as the development of policy and...

    Recent research has drawn attention to the deleterious effects of instability on child development. In particular, child care instability may make it hard for children to form secure attachments to their care providers which may have a negative impact on their development and school readiness. These effects seem to be heightened for low-income children and families. However, there remains a lack of clarity regarding how and why low-income mothers make changes to their child care arrangements. Using ethnographic data from Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three City Study, this study explored 36 low-income mothers' experiences of child care instability and stability and the factors that promoted each. We identified four kinds of child care transitions: planned, averted, failed, and forced. Financial resources, transportation and the availability of care during the hours that mothers work were important for helping mothers find and maintain preferred care arrangements. Our findings have implications for research on child care instability as well as the development of policy and programs to help low-income families secure high quality child care and maintain stable employment. (author abstract)

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