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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Smith, Adrienne C.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    African American women, welfare, and education and training are the focus of this research. Narrative Inquiry methodology was used to explore this qualitative study and it is grounded in the Africentric paradigm (Colin, III, 2010) utilizing the Womanist Epistemological Perspective (Sheared, 1994, 2010) for the unit of analysis. This study “gives voice” (Sheared 1994) to African American women authentic lived experiences (Colin, III, 2007) who have used the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Their stories highlight marginalization and oppression in access and utilization of the education and training activities in the temporary assistance program, capturing the women’s experiences from a polyrhythmic standpoint. In order for social welfare programs to be effective, women need personal development and quality adult education and training programs. (Author abstract)

    African American women, welfare, and education and training are the focus of this research. Narrative Inquiry methodology was used to explore this qualitative study and it is grounded in the Africentric paradigm (Colin, III, 2010) utilizing the Womanist Epistemological Perspective (Sheared, 1994, 2010) for the unit of analysis. This study “gives voice” (Sheared 1994) to African American women authentic lived experiences (Colin, III, 2007) who have used the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Their stories highlight marginalization and oppression in access and utilization of the education and training activities in the temporary assistance program, capturing the women’s experiences from a polyrhythmic standpoint. In order for social welfare programs to be effective, women need personal development and quality adult education and training programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Derr, Michelle; Laird, Elizabeth; Kirby, Gretchen; Lyskawa, Julia
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    This presentation describes a study to explore what factors influence client participation in work activities and what strategies states and localities have used to increase participation in work or work-related activities. Data was collected from site visits (11 communities), telephone interviews (30 TANF administrators), and document reviews (policy manuals, etc.).

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes a study to explore what factors influence client participation in work activities and what strategies states and localities have used to increase participation in work or work-related activities. Data was collected from site visits (11 communities), telephone interviews (30 TANF administrators), and document reviews (policy manuals, etc.).

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Krantz, John
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    This presentation describes an analysis of factors that relate to meeting work participation requirements and whether meeting work participation requirements influences employment outcomes. The analysis was based on data from 1,396 first-time TANF recipients in Utah.

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes an analysis of factors that relate to meeting work participation requirements and whether meeting work participation requirements influences employment outcomes. The analysis was based on data from 1,396 first-time TANF recipients in Utah.

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Lewis, Dan A.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2004

    The 1996 welfare reform forced many poor parents into the labor market, with little understanding of how the parents' workforce participation would affect family life in general and the children in particular. In this paper, the authors use empirical data from a longitudinal study of a random sample of current and former welfare recipients and their children to examine the relationship between parental workforce participation, welfare receipt, and children's academic outcomes. Overall, findings show that children whose parents worked during only one or two of the three waves, as compared with those whose parents worked during all three waves, are significantly more likely to be achieving academically, receiving A's and B's, at Wave 3. The authors found a number of other factors to be significant predictors of children's academic achievement. They found that academic achievement decreases with age, and that girls are more likely to receive A's and B's than boys. They also found a strong relationship between academic achievement in Wave 1 and receiving A's and B's in Wave 3. They...

    The 1996 welfare reform forced many poor parents into the labor market, with little understanding of how the parents' workforce participation would affect family life in general and the children in particular. In this paper, the authors use empirical data from a longitudinal study of a random sample of current and former welfare recipients and their children to examine the relationship between parental workforce participation, welfare receipt, and children's academic outcomes. Overall, findings show that children whose parents worked during only one or two of the three waves, as compared with those whose parents worked during all three waves, are significantly more likely to be achieving academically, receiving A's and B's, at Wave 3. The authors found a number of other factors to be significant predictors of children's academic achievement. They found that academic achievement decreases with age, and that girls are more likely to receive A's and B's than boys. They also found a strong relationship between academic achievement in Wave 1 and receiving A's and B's in Wave 3. They argue that while some level of parental employment may be beneficial for children's academic achievement, long-term employment in low-wage work seems to negatively impact their achievement. (author abstract)

    If you require a one time use copy of this resource please email ssrc@opressrc.org.

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