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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Bureau of Labor Statistics
    Reference Type: Dataset, Report
    Year: 2018

    From April to July 2018, the number of employed youth 16 to 24 years old increased by 2.0 million to 20.9 million, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This year, 55.0 percent of young people were employed in July, little changed from a year earlier. (The month of July typically is the summertime peak in youth employment.) The unemployment rate for youth was 9.2 percent in July, also little changed from July 2017. (Because this analysis focuses on the seasonal changes in youth employment and unemployment that occur each spring and summer, the data are not seasonally adjusted.) (Author introduction)

    From April to July 2018, the number of employed youth 16 to 24 years old increased by 2.0 million to 20.9 million, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This year, 55.0 percent of young people were employed in July, little changed from a year earlier. (The month of July typically is the summertime peak in youth employment.) The unemployment rate for youth was 9.2 percent in July, also little changed from July 2017. (Because this analysis focuses on the seasonal changes in youth employment and unemployment that occur each spring and summer, the data are not seasonally adjusted.) (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: National Archive of Criminal Justice Data
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2016

    Summary: The National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV) series involved three rounds of data collection, NatSCEV I (baseline), NatSCEV II, and this study, NatSCEV III. For more information on other parts to the series, please use the following links: NatSCEV I (ICPSR 35203) - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35203.v1 NatSCEV II (ICPSR 36177) - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36177.v1 The National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence III was designed to obtain lifetime and one-year incidence estimates of a comprehensive range of childhood victimizations across gender, race, and developmental stage. Conducted between August 2013 and April 2014, it assessed the experiences of a nationally representative sample of 4,000 children less than 18 years of age living in the contiguous United States (excluding New Hampshire). A short interview was conducted with an adult caregiver (usually a parent) to obtain family demographic information. One child was...

    Summary: The National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV) series involved three rounds of data collection, NatSCEV I (baseline), NatSCEV II, and this study, NatSCEV III. For more information on other parts to the series, please use the following links: NatSCEV I (ICPSR 35203) - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35203.v1 NatSCEV II (ICPSR 36177) - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36177.v1 The National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence III was designed to obtain lifetime and one-year incidence estimates of a comprehensive range of childhood victimizations across gender, race, and developmental stage. Conducted between August 2013 and April 2014, it assessed the experiences of a nationally representative sample of 4,000 children less than 18 years of age living in the contiguous United States (excluding New Hampshire). A short interview was conducted with an adult caregiver (usually a parent) to obtain family demographic information. One child was randomly selected from all eligible children in a household by selecting the child with the most recent birthday. If the selected child was 1 month to 9 years old, the main interview was conducted with the caregiver. If the selected child was 10-17 years old, the main interview was conducted with the child. The NatSCEV III questionnaire was very similar to the previous wave minus the extended family exposure to violence follow-up section that was included in NatSCEV II. The questionnaire asked for household demographics and questions about the focal child's health. A series of 52 juvenile victimization screening questions (JVQ) were asked, and for every screener the respondent endorsed, a series of follow-up questions about that victimization was asked. In addition, the survey included sections on lifetime and past year adversity, internet victimization, community disorder, bullying, delinquency, and the child/parent relationship. Time Period:  1997--2014 Date of Collection:  2013-08-28--2014-04-30Unit of Observation:   Individual, Household

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2012

    Description: The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six types of health-risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death and disability among youth and adults, including behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence, tobacco use, alcohol and other drug use, sexual risk behaviors, unhealthy dietary behaviors, and physical inactivity. YRBSS also measures the prevalence of obesity and asthma among youth and young adults. YRBSS includes a national school-based survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state, territorial, tribal, and local surveys conducted by state, territorial, and local education, health agencies, and tribal governments.

    Population: Nationally representative sample of students in grades nine through 12 (2005 included grades six through eight) from majority of states (47 in 2009), identified through cluster sampling. 2005 national sample included 13,953 participants.

    Periodicity: Data available from 1991-2013....

    Description: The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six types of health-risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death and disability among youth and adults, including behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence, tobacco use, alcohol and other drug use, sexual risk behaviors, unhealthy dietary behaviors, and physical inactivity. YRBSS also measures the prevalence of obesity and asthma among youth and young adults. YRBSS includes a national school-based survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state, territorial, tribal, and local surveys conducted by state, territorial, and local education, health agencies, and tribal governments.

    Population: Nationally representative sample of students in grades nine through 12 (2005 included grades six through eight) from majority of states (47 in 2009), identified through cluster sampling. 2005 national sample included 13,953 participants.

    Periodicity: Data available from 1991-2013.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Children's Bureau
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2011

    Description: The National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) will collect case-level information on youth in care including the services paid for or provided by the State agencies that administer the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP), as well as the outcome information on youth who are in or who have aged out of foster care.

    Population: Youth ages 17-21.

    Periodicity: Baseline data collection for the first cohort of 17 year-old youths in foster care began in 2010. States will track these youth as they age and conduct a new outcome survey on or around the youth's 19th birthday; and again on or around the youth's 21st birthday. All States will collect and report outcome information on a new baseline population cohort every three years.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

    Description: The National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) will collect case-level information on youth in care including the services paid for or provided by the State agencies that administer the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP), as well as the outcome information on youth who are in or who have aged out of foster care.

    Population: Youth ages 17-21.

    Periodicity: Baseline data collection for the first cohort of 17 year-old youths in foster care began in 2010. States will track these youth as they age and conduct a new outcome survey on or around the youth's 19th birthday; and again on or around the youth's 21st birthday. All States will collect and report outcome information on a new baseline population cohort every three years.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2011

    Description: The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) was designed to provide policy makers, researchers, child care providers, teachers, and parents with detailed information about children's early life experiences. Data collected for the ECLS-B focus on children's health, development, care, and education from birth through kindergarten entry.

    Population: Nationally representative sample of 14,000 children born in 2001 (and from diverse socioeconomic and racial/ethnic backgrounds, oversampled Asian children), followed from birth through kindergarten entry (2006-2007). Birth certificates are used to establish parents’ backgrounds. Parents interviewed about themselves and children at all waves; children observed and participated in assessments; child care and early education providers were interviewed; teachers provided information at kindergarten level.

    Periodicity: Data collected when children were approximately nine months old (2001-2002), two years old (2003-2004), four years old (2005-2006...

    Description: The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) was designed to provide policy makers, researchers, child care providers, teachers, and parents with detailed information about children's early life experiences. Data collected for the ECLS-B focus on children's health, development, care, and education from birth through kindergarten entry.

    Population: Nationally representative sample of 14,000 children born in 2001 (and from diverse socioeconomic and racial/ethnic backgrounds, oversampled Asian children), followed from birth through kindergarten entry (2006-2007). Birth certificates are used to establish parents’ backgrounds. Parents interviewed about themselves and children at all waves; children observed and participated in assessments; child care and early education providers were interviewed; teachers provided information at kindergarten level.

    Periodicity: Data collected when children were approximately nine months old (2001-2002), two years old (2003-2004), four years old (2005-2006), kindergarten level or higher (2006), not yet in kindergarten or higher (2007).

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Fatherhood roles, parents' education

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

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