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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE)
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2015

    Description: The objective of the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) is to document the nation's current utilization and availability of early care and education (including school-age care), and to deepen understanding of the extent to which families' needs and preferences coordinate well with provider's offerings and constraints. The experiences of low-income families are of special interest as they are the focus of a significant component of early care and education/school-age (ECE/SA) public policy. The NSECE calls for a nationally-representative sample including interviews in all fifty states and Washington, DC. Data are scheduled to be collected December 2011-May 2012. The final NSECE design includes four survey components and four related questionnaires: (1) The Household Survey conducted with a parent or guardian of a child or children under age 13. Eligible respondents are to be identified through the Household Screener, and information collected about every child under age 13 in each sampled household, including all the regular ECE...

    Description: The objective of the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) is to document the nation's current utilization and availability of early care and education (including school-age care), and to deepen understanding of the extent to which families' needs and preferences coordinate well with provider's offerings and constraints. The experiences of low-income families are of special interest as they are the focus of a significant component of early care and education/school-age (ECE/SA) public policy. The NSECE calls for a nationally-representative sample including interviews in all fifty states and Washington, DC. Data are scheduled to be collected December 2011-May 2012. The final NSECE design includes four survey components and four related questionnaires: (1) The Household Survey conducted with a parent or guardian of a child or children under age 13. Eligible respondents are to be identified through the Household Screener, and information collected about every child under age 13 in each sampled household, including all the regular ECE arrangements. Data include 17,512 interviews with adults in households with children under age 13; (2) The Family, Friend, Neighbor and Nanny (FFNN) Survey conducted with individuals who care in a home-based setting for children under age 13 who are not their own (and who do not appear on an administrative list of ECE/SA providers). Eligible respondents are to be identified through the Household Screener, and estimated data will include approximately 5,000 completed interviews with FFNN providers; (3) The Formal Provider Survey conducted with directors of ECE/SA providers who can be identified from administrative lists such as state licensing lists, Head Start program records, or pre-K rolls, including regulated or registered home-based providers who appear on state-level administrative lists. Data will include interviews with 18,800 programs; (4) The Workforce Provider Survey conducted with one staff member from each of the sampled formal providers after each Center-based Provider interview is completed. Data will include interviews with workforce members from 10,800 programs. The NSECE contract also includes an option for States to contribute to the study to supplement samples in order to conduct state-level studies of populations of interest. Preparatory work for the NSECE was accomplished through the Design Phase of the National Study of Child Care Supply and Demand.

    Population: In the fall of 2011 national data collection began in 755 communities across all 50 states, including D.C. and concluded in the spring of 2012.  Data was collected from four coordinated nationally representative samples: households, center- and home-based providers appearing on state lists, home-based providers not appearing on state lists, and staff working in center-based classrooms. 

    Periodicity: Data was collected from four coordinated nationally representative samples: households, center- and home-based providers appearing on state lists, home-based providers not appearing on state lists, and staff working in center-based classrooms. 2010-2015.

    (information adapted from the publisher)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Children's Bureau
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2011

    Description: The National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) will collect case-level information on youth in care including the services paid for or provided by the State agencies that administer the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP), as well as the outcome information on youth who are in or who have aged out of foster care.

    Population: Youth ages 17-21.

    Periodicity: Baseline data collection for the first cohort of 17 year-old youths in foster care began in 2010. States will track these youth as they age and conduct a new outcome survey on or around the youth's 19th birthday; and again on or around the youth's 21st birthday. All States will collect and report outcome information on a new baseline population cohort every three years.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

    Description: The National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) will collect case-level information on youth in care including the services paid for or provided by the State agencies that administer the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP), as well as the outcome information on youth who are in or who have aged out of foster care.

    Population: Youth ages 17-21.

    Periodicity: Baseline data collection for the first cohort of 17 year-old youths in foster care began in 2010. States will track these youth as they age and conduct a new outcome survey on or around the youth's 19th birthday; and again on or around the youth's 21st birthday. All States will collect and report outcome information on a new baseline population cohort every three years.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2011

    Description: The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) was designed to provide policy makers, researchers, child care providers, teachers, and parents with detailed information about children's early life experiences. Data collected for the ECLS-B focus on children's health, development, care, and education from birth through kindergarten entry.

    Population: Nationally representative sample of 14,000 children born in 2001 (and from diverse socioeconomic and racial/ethnic backgrounds, oversampled Asian children), followed from birth through kindergarten entry (2006-2007). Birth certificates are used to establish parents’ backgrounds. Parents interviewed about themselves and children at all waves; children observed and participated in assessments; child care and early education providers were interviewed; teachers provided information at kindergarten level.

    Periodicity: Data collected when children were approximately nine months old (2001-2002), two years old (2003-2004), four years old (2005-2006...

    Description: The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) was designed to provide policy makers, researchers, child care providers, teachers, and parents with detailed information about children's early life experiences. Data collected for the ECLS-B focus on children's health, development, care, and education from birth through kindergarten entry.

    Population: Nationally representative sample of 14,000 children born in 2001 (and from diverse socioeconomic and racial/ethnic backgrounds, oversampled Asian children), followed from birth through kindergarten entry (2006-2007). Birth certificates are used to establish parents’ backgrounds. Parents interviewed about themselves and children at all waves; children observed and participated in assessments; child care and early education providers were interviewed; teachers provided information at kindergarten level.

    Periodicity: Data collected when children were approximately nine months old (2001-2002), two years old (2003-2004), four years old (2005-2006), kindergarten level or higher (2006), not yet in kindergarten or higher (2007).

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Fatherhood roles, parents' education

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Annie E. Casey Foundation
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2011

    Description: The KIDS COUNT Data Book profiles the status of children on a national and state-by-state basis and ranks states on ten key measures of child well-being, while also providing data on several others. These ten key indicators include: low-birth weight rate, infant mortality rate, child mortality rate (ages one to 14), teen death rate (ages 15-19), teen birth rate (15-19), high school dropout rate (ages 16-19), teens not working or in school (ages 16-19), underemployed parents, children living in poverty, and children in single-parent families.

    Population: Data are collected from federal statistical agencies.

    Periodicity: Data available from 1990-2014. Data collected/published annually.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

    Description: The KIDS COUNT Data Book profiles the status of children on a national and state-by-state basis and ranks states on ten key measures of child well-being, while also providing data on several others. These ten key indicators include: low-birth weight rate, infant mortality rate, child mortality rate (ages one to 14), teen death rate (ages 15-19), teen birth rate (15-19), high school dropout rate (ages 16-19), teens not working or in school (ages 16-19), underemployed parents, children living in poverty, and children in single-parent families.

    Population: Data are collected from federal statistical agencies.

    Periodicity: Data available from 1990-2014. Data collected/published annually.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2008

    Description: The Panel Study of Income Dynamics- Child Development Supplement (PSID-CDS) collected data on a broad array of developmental outcomes including physical health, emotional well-being, intellectual and academic achievement, cognitive ability, social relationships with family and peers, time diaries, and much more.

    Population: Supplement to the PSID focusing on zero to 12 year old children and their parents. 2,394 families initially interviewed, providing information on 3,563 children.

    Periodicity: Data first collected in 1968 and was taken annually until 1997.  Data now collected biennially.  Available through 2015.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

    Description: The Panel Study of Income Dynamics- Child Development Supplement (PSID-CDS) collected data on a broad array of developmental outcomes including physical health, emotional well-being, intellectual and academic achievement, cognitive ability, social relationships with family and peers, time diaries, and much more.

    Population: Supplement to the PSID focusing on zero to 12 year old children and their parents. 2,394 families initially interviewed, providing information on 3,563 children.

    Periodicity: Data first collected in 1968 and was taken annually until 1997.  Data now collected biennially.  Available through 2015.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.