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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality; The Russell Sage Foundation
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2013

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

  • Individual Author: Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2012

    Description: The Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) is designed to monitor the transition of a national sample of young people as they progress from tenth grade through high school and on to postsecondary education and/or the workforce. ELS: 2002 has two distinctive features. First, it is a longitudinal study, which means that the same individuals are surveyed repeatedly over time. Second, it is a multilevel study, which means that information is collected from multiple respondent populations that represent students, their parents, their teachers, their librarians, and their schools.

    Population: Nationally representative cohort of high school students, starting from when they were sophomores (2002), collecting data continuously as they move into postsecondary education and/or the labor market.

    Periodicity: Data first collected in 2002, first follow-up in 2004, second follow-up in 2006, third follow-up in 2012.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the...

    Description: The Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) is designed to monitor the transition of a national sample of young people as they progress from tenth grade through high school and on to postsecondary education and/or the workforce. ELS: 2002 has two distinctive features. First, it is a longitudinal study, which means that the same individuals are surveyed repeatedly over time. Second, it is a multilevel study, which means that information is collected from multiple respondent populations that represent students, their parents, their teachers, their librarians, and their schools.

    Population: Nationally representative cohort of high school students, starting from when they were sophomores (2002), collecting data continuously as they move into postsecondary education and/or the labor market.

    Periodicity: Data first collected in 2002, first follow-up in 2004, second follow-up in 2006, third follow-up in 2012.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2011

    Description: The Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) measures economic, social, and health factors over the life course of families over multiple generations.

    Population: Nationally representative sample of approximately 18,000 individuals from 4,802 households (2,930 nationally representative plus over sample of 1,872 low income) and their descendants.  Head of household is contacted and interviewed over the phone.

    Periodicity: Data first collected in 1968 and was taken annually until 1997.  Data now collected biennially.  Available through 2015.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Income transfers, food expenditures, children/family status. 

    (Information adapted from the distributor)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

    Description: The Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) measures economic, social, and health factors over the life course of families over multiple generations.

    Population: Nationally representative sample of approximately 18,000 individuals from 4,802 households (2,930 nationally representative plus over sample of 1,872 low income) and their descendants.  Head of household is contacted and interviewed over the phone.

    Periodicity: Data first collected in 1968 and was taken annually until 1997.  Data now collected biennially.  Available through 2015.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Income transfers, food expenditures, children/family status. 

    (Information adapted from the distributor)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2011

    Description: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 (NLSY97) is designed to document the transition from school to work and into adulthood. It collects extensive information about youths' labor market behavior and educational experiences over time. Aside from educational and labor market experiences, the NLSY97 contains detailed information on many other topics including: youths' relationships with parents, contact with absent parents, marital and fertility histories, dating, sexual activity, onset of puberty, training, participation in government assistance programs, expectations, time use, criminal behavior, and alcohol and drug use.

    Population: Survey of nationally representative sample of 8,984 young men and women, from 6,819 households, born between 1980 and 1984 and first interviewed in 1997. Data collected from school surveys, interviews, etc., in annual waves.

    Periodicity: This ongoing cohort has been surveyed 17 times to date and is now interviewed biennially. Data are now available from Round 1 (...

    Description: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 (NLSY97) is designed to document the transition from school to work and into adulthood. It collects extensive information about youths' labor market behavior and educational experiences over time. Aside from educational and labor market experiences, the NLSY97 contains detailed information on many other topics including: youths' relationships with parents, contact with absent parents, marital and fertility histories, dating, sexual activity, onset of puberty, training, participation in government assistance programs, expectations, time use, criminal behavior, and alcohol and drug use.

    Population: Survey of nationally representative sample of 8,984 young men and women, from 6,819 households, born between 1980 and 1984 and first interviewed in 1997. Data collected from school surveys, interviews, etc., in annual waves.

    Periodicity: This ongoing cohort has been surveyed 17 times to date and is now interviewed biennially. Data are now available from Round 1 (1997-98) to Round 17 (2015-16).

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Youth employment history, educational experiences, time use, youths’ early child care, and custody arrangements.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: U.S. Census Bureau
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2010

    Description: The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data annually with an aim to give communities the current information they need to plan investments and services.

    Population: The survey is mailed to three million Americans per year (250,000 monthly) in order to get a nationally representative sample. Approximately two million interviews conducted per year, with some personal visit follow-up.

    Periodicity: 2005-2017 and will continue annually.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: benefits, expenses

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

    Description: The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data annually with an aim to give communities the current information they need to plan investments and services.

    Population: The survey is mailed to three million Americans per year (250,000 monthly) in order to get a nationally representative sample. Approximately two million interviews conducted per year, with some personal visit follow-up.

    Periodicity: 2005-2017 and will continue annually.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: benefits, expenses

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.