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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Camargo Plazas, Pilar ; Cameron, Brenda L.; Milford, Krista ; Hunt, Lindsay Ruth ; Bourque-Bearskin, Lisa ; Santos Salas, Anna
    Year: 2018

    In Canada, Indigenous peoples bear a greater burden of illness and suffer disproportionate health disparities compared to non-Indigenous people. Difficult access to healthcare services has contributed to this gap. In this article, we present findings from a dissemination grant aimed to engage Indigenous youth in popular theatre to explore inequities in access to health services for Indigenous people in a Western province in Canada. Following an Indigenous and action research approach, we undertook popular theatre as a means to disseminate our research findings. Popular theatre allows audience members to engage with a scene relevant to their own personal situation and to intervene during the performance to create multiple ways of critically understanding and reacting to a difficult situation. Using popular theatre was successful in generating discussion and engaging the community and healthcare professionals to discuss next steps to increasing access to healthcare services. Popular theatre and short dramas provide a venue for mirroring stigmatized care and expose racial biases in...

    In Canada, Indigenous peoples bear a greater burden of illness and suffer disproportionate health disparities compared to non-Indigenous people. Difficult access to healthcare services has contributed to this gap. In this article, we present findings from a dissemination grant aimed to engage Indigenous youth in popular theatre to explore inequities in access to health services for Indigenous people in a Western province in Canada. Following an Indigenous and action research approach, we undertook popular theatre as a means to disseminate our research findings. Popular theatre allows audience members to engage with a scene relevant to their own personal situation and to intervene during the performance to create multiple ways of critically understanding and reacting to a difficult situation. Using popular theatre was successful in generating discussion and engaging the community and healthcare professionals to discuss next steps to increasing access to healthcare services. Popular theatre and short dramas provide a venue for mirroring stigmatized care and expose racial biases in the delivery of care. The contributions of the students, their input, and their acting were to increase our awareness even more of the pervasiveness of the stigmatized care that Indigenous people experience. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Porter, Kristin; Hendra, Richard; Balu, Rekha
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the use of predictive analytics to assess an individual’s risk of not reaching key self-sufficiency milestones, to target individuals based on their level of risk, and to refine human services based on the characteristics and behaviors of individuals within levels of risk.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the use of predictive analytics to assess an individual’s risk of not reaching key self-sufficiency milestones, to target individuals based on their level of risk, and to refine human services based on the characteristics and behaviors of individuals within levels of risk.

  • Individual Author: Mohan, Lavanya
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    As part of the TANF Education and Training series, CLASP highlights state innovations in Nebraska that help TANF recipients pursue postsecondary and skills training. Nebraska’s Employment First (EF) program allows parents who receive TANF cash assistance to pursue education and training that improves their ability to secure employment and long-term economic success. Employment First is funded through Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), Nebraska’s state TANF program. ADC benefits are available to families with a household income that is below approximately 47% of the federal poverty level. EF’s goal is to help families achieve self-sufficiency within the five-year limit of receiving cash assistance. (author abstract) 

     

    As part of the TANF Education and Training series, CLASP highlights state innovations in Nebraska that help TANF recipients pursue postsecondary and skills training. Nebraska’s Employment First (EF) program allows parents who receive TANF cash assistance to pursue education and training that improves their ability to secure employment and long-term economic success. Employment First is funded through Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), Nebraska’s state TANF program. ADC benefits are available to families with a household income that is below approximately 47% of the federal poverty level. EF’s goal is to help families achieve self-sufficiency within the five-year limit of receiving cash assistance. (author abstract) 

     

  • Individual Author: Riva, Sherry
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    A revitalized Family Self-Sufficiency program helps families in subsidized housing increase their earnings, build assets, reduce reliance on public assistance, and become financially secure. (author abstract)

    A revitalized Family Self-Sufficiency program helps families in subsidized housing increase their earnings, build assets, reduce reliance on public assistance, and become financially secure. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Aspen Institute; Georgetown University
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    There is no greater challenge in the United States today than income inequality. It has been 50 years since the War on Poverty began. We have made progress but not enough. More than 32 million children live in low-income families, and racial and gender gaps persist. For the first time, Americans do not believe life will be better for the next generation. We have both a moral and an economic imperative to fuel social and economic mobility in this country.

    The Bottom Line: Investing for Impact on Economic Mobility in the U.S. recognizes the importance of learning from all sectors in tackling any challenge. Specifically, it builds on opportunities in the growing impact investment field. The report draws on the lessons from market-based approaches to identify tools and strategies that can help move the needle on family economic security. (publisher abstract)

    There is no greater challenge in the United States today than income inequality. It has been 50 years since the War on Poverty began. We have made progress but not enough. More than 32 million children live in low-income families, and racial and gender gaps persist. For the first time, Americans do not believe life will be better for the next generation. We have both a moral and an economic imperative to fuel social and economic mobility in this country.

    The Bottom Line: Investing for Impact on Economic Mobility in the U.S. recognizes the importance of learning from all sectors in tackling any challenge. Specifically, it builds on opportunities in the growing impact investment field. The report draws on the lessons from market-based approaches to identify tools and strategies that can help move the needle on family economic security. (publisher abstract)

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