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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Yoder, Jamie R.; Brisson, Daniel; Lopez, Amy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    The effect of nonresidential father relationship characteristics on delinquency trajectories among low-income youth (N = 799) was examined using data from the Three Cities Study, a longitudinal study of mothers and their children eligible for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio. Growth curve models were employed to track delinquency trajectories and their rate of growth. Characteristics of father-child relationships (anger-alienation, trust-communication) were specified as predictors of delinquency while controlling for father involvement and family structure. Trust-communication influenced delinquency growth, but the rate of growth slowed as youth aged. Implications for programs, interventions, and policy are explored. (Author abstract)

    The effect of nonresidential father relationship characteristics on delinquency trajectories among low-income youth (N = 799) was examined using data from the Three Cities Study, a longitudinal study of mothers and their children eligible for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio. Growth curve models were employed to track delinquency trajectories and their rate of growth. Characteristics of father-child relationships (anger-alienation, trust-communication) were specified as predictors of delinquency while controlling for father involvement and family structure. Trust-communication influenced delinquency growth, but the rate of growth slowed as youth aged. Implications for programs, interventions, and policy are explored. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pendall, Rolf; Hendey, Leah; Greenberg, David; Pettit, Kathryn L.S.; Levy, Diane; Khare, Amy; Gallagher, Megan; Joseph, Mark; Curley, Alexandra; Rasheed, Aesha; Latham, Nancy; Brecher, Audra ; Hailey, Chantal
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (Choice) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) aims to transform distressed, high-poverty rate neighborhoods into revitalized mixed-income neighborhoods. Its primary vehicle to catalyze this transformation is the rebuilding of distressed public and assisted housing into energy-efficient, mixed-income housing that is physically and financially viable. (author abstract)

    The Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (Choice) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) aims to transform distressed, high-poverty rate neighborhoods into revitalized mixed-income neighborhoods. Its primary vehicle to catalyze this transformation is the rebuilding of distressed public and assisted housing into energy-efficient, mixed-income housing that is physically and financially viable. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Babcock, Elisabeth; Diamond, Adele; Padilla, John
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    Emerging research from psychology and neuroscience suggests that healthy executive functioning is critical for behaviors such as goal-setting, self-regulation, planning, and problem-solving. This plenary session will address the implications of executive functioning research for human services programs and examine how emerging insights can strengthen programs designed to help families achieve self-sufficiency. LaDonna Pavetti (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) will moderate this session. Panelists are:

    • Elisabeth Babcock (Crittenton Women’s Union)

    • Adele Diamond (The University of British Columbia)

    • John Padilla (New Paradigms Consulting, LLC) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

    Emerging research from psychology and neuroscience suggests that healthy executive functioning is critical for behaviors such as goal-setting, self-regulation, planning, and problem-solving. This plenary session will address the implications of executive functioning research for human services programs and examine how emerging insights can strengthen programs designed to help families achieve self-sufficiency. LaDonna Pavetti (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) will moderate this session. Panelists are:

    • Elisabeth Babcock (Crittenton Women’s Union)

    • Adele Diamond (The University of British Columbia)

    • John Padilla (New Paradigms Consulting, LLC) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

  • Individual Author: Wood-Boyle, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Homelessness prevention saves low-income people from trauma and upheaval while potentially saving property owners from the high costs of the eviction process. Scarce affordable units and skyrocketing market rents have created a housing crisis for low-income individuals and families.

    The National Low Income Housing Coalition estimates that a minimum-wage worker would need to work 140 hours per week, 52 weeks per year, to be able to reasonably afford a two-bedroom apartment in the Greater Boston area, for example. After years of waiting and navigating a seemingly endless maze of bureaucracy, some low-income households may be lucky enough to receive an affordable rent subsidy (also known as subsidized housing), which allows tenants to pay no more than 30 percent of their monthly income to rent. However, even for low-income tenants residing in subsidized housing, keeping up with monthly rent payments can be a struggle. (author introduction)

    Homelessness prevention saves low-income people from trauma and upheaval while potentially saving property owners from the high costs of the eviction process. Scarce affordable units and skyrocketing market rents have created a housing crisis for low-income individuals and families.

    The National Low Income Housing Coalition estimates that a minimum-wage worker would need to work 140 hours per week, 52 weeks per year, to be able to reasonably afford a two-bedroom apartment in the Greater Boston area, for example. After years of waiting and navigating a seemingly endless maze of bureaucracy, some low-income households may be lucky enough to receive an affordable rent subsidy (also known as subsidized housing), which allows tenants to pay no more than 30 percent of their monthly income to rent. However, even for low-income tenants residing in subsidized housing, keeping up with monthly rent payments can be a struggle. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Washington, Valora; Reed, Mary
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    This ethnographic case study of the Massachusetts voucher system tests the belief that demand subsidies increase choice and purchasing power for working poor families while improving the quality of care for children. Using multiple methodologies, we examined vouchers’ impact on parents, child care providers, and resource and referral agencies. All participants recognized the value of the subsidy. Yet low reimbursement rates forced providers to subsidize the system; many limited or refused vouchers. Providers and families had a strong bond; each was often overwhelmed by and suspicious of voucher administration. Children experienced discontinuity of care. Underresourced, resource and referral agencies struggle to balance a dual mission of service and policing. Specific policy recommendations were suggested, and adopted, in Massachusetts. (author abstract)

    This ethnographic case study of the Massachusetts voucher system tests the belief that demand subsidies increase choice and purchasing power for working poor families while improving the quality of care for children. Using multiple methodologies, we examined vouchers’ impact on parents, child care providers, and resource and referral agencies. All participants recognized the value of the subsidy. Yet low reimbursement rates forced providers to subsidize the system; many limited or refused vouchers. Providers and families had a strong bond; each was often overwhelmed by and suspicious of voucher administration. Children experienced discontinuity of care. Underresourced, resource and referral agencies struggle to balance a dual mission of service and policing. Specific policy recommendations were suggested, and adopted, in Massachusetts. (author abstract)

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