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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Betts, Julian; Bachofer, Karen Volz; Hayes, Joseph; Hill, Laura; Lee, Andrew; Zau, Andrew
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    The paper uses longitudinal student data to study the correlates of academic progress of English Learners (ELs) in the Los Angeles and San Diego Unified School Districts, which together account for roughly 15% of ELs in California and 5% in the nation. We focus on two types of ELs of special policy concern – Long Term ELs who have completed at least five years in the district without being reclassified as English-fluent, and Late Arriving ELs who arrive in the district during secondary school with low levels of English proficiency. We study in detail the fidelity with which schools assign ELs to English Language Development (ELD) classes according to each districts’ EL Master Plans. We then model gains in English and math performance, and on the state’s test of EL language proficiency, as a function of a school’s fidelity of implementation to the course placement criteria. We also consider two other types of factors: multiple measures of the demographic makeup of the school’s student body — including the percentage of students who are ELs and the diversity of languages spoken —...

    The paper uses longitudinal student data to study the correlates of academic progress of English Learners (ELs) in the Los Angeles and San Diego Unified School Districts, which together account for roughly 15% of ELs in California and 5% in the nation. We focus on two types of ELs of special policy concern – Long Term ELs who have completed at least five years in the district without being reclassified as English-fluent, and Late Arriving ELs who arrive in the district during secondary school with low levels of English proficiency. We study in detail the fidelity with which schools assign ELs to English Language Development (ELD) classes according to each districts’ EL Master Plans. We then model gains in English and math performance, and on the state’s test of EL language proficiency, as a function of a school’s fidelity of implementation to the course placement criteria. We also consider two other types of factors: multiple measures of the demographic makeup of the school’s student body — including the percentage of students who are ELs and the diversity of languages spoken — and indicators of various programs and supports the two districts provide to ELs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gelatt, Julia; Koball, Heather; Bernstein, Hamutal; Runes, Charmaine; Pratt, Eleanor
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Over seven million U.S. children live with at least one noncitizen parent -- and 80 percent of these children are US-born citizens. Close to 5 million US-citizen children live with an unauthorized immigrant parent, potentially subject to deportation. Research has shown that the deportation of a parent has serious deleterious effects on families—emotional distress, behavioral issues, and economic hardship for children—and that even the threat of deportation can hurt a family’s well-being by causing fear that restricts mobility, access to jobs, and use of public and private supports in times of need. The election of President Trump, with his plans to increase efforts to identify and deport unauthorized immigrants, has signaled a harsher policy environment for immigrant families than in recent years. In State Immigration Enforcement Policies: How They Impact Low-Income Households, researchers at NCCP, Urban Institute, and Migration Policy Institute looked at how the changing immigration policy environment is likely to affect immigrant families. Specifically, the report examines...

    Over seven million U.S. children live with at least one noncitizen parent -- and 80 percent of these children are US-born citizens. Close to 5 million US-citizen children live with an unauthorized immigrant parent, potentially subject to deportation. Research has shown that the deportation of a parent has serious deleterious effects on families—emotional distress, behavioral issues, and economic hardship for children—and that even the threat of deportation can hurt a family’s well-being by causing fear that restricts mobility, access to jobs, and use of public and private supports in times of need. The election of President Trump, with his plans to increase efforts to identify and deport unauthorized immigrants, has signaled a harsher policy environment for immigrant families than in recent years. In State Immigration Enforcement Policies: How They Impact Low-Income Households, researchers at NCCP, Urban Institute, and Migration Policy Institute looked at how the changing immigration policy environment is likely to affect immigrant families. Specifically, the report examines whether immigrant families living in states that ramped up enforcement of federal policy saw any changes in their material hardship, or how often fear of deportation affected their ability to pay for essentials (such as rent, utilities, or food). Developed with an interactive “State Immigration Policy Resource”, the report highlights important connections between immigration policy enforcement and well-being in immigrant households. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Aratani, Yumiko; Heflin, Colleen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    The nation’s old, predominantly white population is being replaced by children of racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds. The ability of the safety net to adapt will determine how well these groups are able to successfully transition into stable, self-sufficient adults. (Author introduction)

    The nation’s old, predominantly white population is being replaced by children of racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds. The ability of the safety net to adapt will determine how well these groups are able to successfully transition into stable, self-sufficient adults. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Zhang, Liwei; Han, Wen-Jui
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Using Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998–1999 (ECLS-K), we investigated the relationship between poverty and academic trajectories for children in immigrant families in the United States. We used family socioeconomic status (SES) which considers parental education, parental occupation, and family income to define poverty in correspondence with the U.S. federal poverty threshold. Three dimensions of poverty were examined including depth (i.e., not-poor, near-poor, poor or extreme poor), stability (i.e., continuously or intermittently), and duration (i.e., for how many times in poverty). Our results indicated that living in poverty, particularly when it was extreme, volatile, and for long spell could compromise children’s reading and math achievements during the first nine schooling years. Children of immigrants were doing as well as, if not better than, children of native-borns in certain areas (i.e., math) or in facing of certain pattern of poverty (i.e., long-spell). However, deep poverty and volatile changes in family SES could compromise academic...

    Using Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998–1999 (ECLS-K), we investigated the relationship between poverty and academic trajectories for children in immigrant families in the United States. We used family socioeconomic status (SES) which considers parental education, parental occupation, and family income to define poverty in correspondence with the U.S. federal poverty threshold. Three dimensions of poverty were examined including depth (i.e., not-poor, near-poor, poor or extreme poor), stability (i.e., continuously or intermittently), and duration (i.e., for how many times in poverty). Our results indicated that living in poverty, particularly when it was extreme, volatile, and for long spell could compromise children’s reading and math achievements during the first nine schooling years. Children of immigrants were doing as well as, if not better than, children of native-borns in certain areas (i.e., math) or in facing of certain pattern of poverty (i.e., long-spell). However, deep poverty and volatile changes in family SES could compromise academic achievements for children of immigrants throughout their first nine years of schooling, a period holds important key to their future success. Implications to practice and policy as well as future directions were discussed. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Bitler, Marianne; Hoynes, Hilary ; Kuka, Elira
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    In this paper, we comprehensively examine the effects of the Great Recession on child poverty, with particular attention to the role of the social safety net in mitigating the adverse effects of shocks to earnings and income. Using a state panel data model and data for 2000 to 2014, we estimate the relationship between the business cycle and child poverty, and we examine how and to what extent the safety net is providing protection to at-risk children. We find compelling evidence that the safety net provides protection; that is, the cyclicality of after-tax-and-transfer child poverty is significantly attenuated relative to the cyclicality of private income poverty. We also find that the protective effect of the safety net is not similar across demographic groups, and that children from more disadvantaged backgrounds, such as those living with Hispanic or single heads, or particularly those living with immigrant household heads—or immigrant spouses—experience larger poverty cyclicality than those living with non-Hispanic white or married heads, or those living with native...

    In this paper, we comprehensively examine the effects of the Great Recession on child poverty, with particular attention to the role of the social safety net in mitigating the adverse effects of shocks to earnings and income. Using a state panel data model and data for 2000 to 2014, we estimate the relationship between the business cycle and child poverty, and we examine how and to what extent the safety net is providing protection to at-risk children. We find compelling evidence that the safety net provides protection; that is, the cyclicality of after-tax-and-transfer child poverty is significantly attenuated relative to the cyclicality of private income poverty. We also find that the protective effect of the safety net is not similar across demographic groups, and that children from more disadvantaged backgrounds, such as those living with Hispanic or single heads, or particularly those living with immigrant household heads—or immigrant spouses—experience larger poverty cyclicality than those living with non-Hispanic white or married heads, or those living with native household heads with native spouses. Our findings hold across a host of choices for how to define poverty. These include measures based on absolute thresholds or more relative thresholds. They also hold for measures of resources that include not only cash and near-cash transfers net of taxes but also several measures of the value of public medical benefits. (Author abstract)

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