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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Eckrich Sommer, Teresa ; Sabol, Terri J. ; Chor, Elise ; Schneider, William ; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay ; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne ; Small, Mario L. ; King, Christopher ; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    We propose a two-generation anti-poverty strategy to improve the economic fortunes of children in the United States. Our policy bridges two traditionally siloed interventions to boost their impacts: Head Start for children and career pathway training offered through community colleges for adults. We expect that an integrated two-generation human capital intervention will produce greater gains than either Head Start or community college alone for developmental and motivational, logistical and financial, social capital, and efficiency reasons. We suggest a competitive grant program to test and evaluate different models using federal dollars. We estimate average benefit-cost ratios across a range of promising career fields of 1.3 within five years and 7.9 within ten years if 10 percent of Head Start parents participate in two-generation programs. (Author abstract)

     

    We propose a two-generation anti-poverty strategy to improve the economic fortunes of children in the United States. Our policy bridges two traditionally siloed interventions to boost their impacts: Head Start for children and career pathway training offered through community colleges for adults. We expect that an integrated two-generation human capital intervention will produce greater gains than either Head Start or community college alone for developmental and motivational, logistical and financial, social capital, and efficiency reasons. We suggest a competitive grant program to test and evaluate different models using federal dollars. We estimate average benefit-cost ratios across a range of promising career fields of 1.3 within five years and 7.9 within ten years if 10 percent of Head Start parents participate in two-generation programs. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Wright, Girley; Cummings, Danielle; Millenky, Megan; Valentine, Erin
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Employment rates for disadvantaged youth and young adults were falling even before the Great Recession, but this group was particularly hard-hit by the downturn, and their rates of joblessness remain stubbornly high. This session presented results from three rigorous evaluations of large-scale programs designed to improve employment outcomes for disadvantaged youth. Girley Wright (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    Employment rates for disadvantaged youth and young adults were falling even before the Great Recession, but this group was particularly hard-hit by the downturn, and their rates of joblessness remain stubbornly high. This session presented results from three rigorous evaluations of large-scale programs designed to improve employment outcomes for disadvantaged youth. Girley Wright (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Levin, Jesse; Brodziak de los Reyes, Iliana; Atchison, Drew; Manship, Karen; Arellanes, Melissa; Hu, Lynn
    Reference Type: Conference Paper, Report
    Year: 2018

    The need for costing-out studies is clear given the clauses found in virtually all state constitutions that dictate that the state has a responsibility to provide an education that is considered adequate, sufficient or some other term that represents a level that allows all students an opportunity to achieve the outcomes expected of the public education system. If states are to follow through on this obligation then it is necessary to understand both the amount of effort involved in terms the public funding required to offer educational sufficiency and how to appropriately distribute this funding. More formally stated, the main objectives of educational costing-out studies are to answer what have been referred to as the two fundamental questions of educational adequacy (Chambers & Levin, 2009): 

    • What does it cost to enable a public school system to provide all students with an adequate education?
    • How can state school finance systems allocate their resources equitably, such that all students are afforded an adequate education regardless of their need or...

    The need for costing-out studies is clear given the clauses found in virtually all state constitutions that dictate that the state has a responsibility to provide an education that is considered adequate, sufficient or some other term that represents a level that allows all students an opportunity to achieve the outcomes expected of the public education system. If states are to follow through on this obligation then it is necessary to understand both the amount of effort involved in terms the public funding required to offer educational sufficiency and how to appropriately distribute this funding. More formally stated, the main objectives of educational costing-out studies are to answer what have been referred to as the two fundamental questions of educational adequacy (Chambers & Levin, 2009): 

    • What does it cost to enable a public school system to provide all students with an adequate education?
    • How can state school finance systems allocate their resources equitably, such that all students are afforded an adequate education regardless of their need or circumstance?

    The proposed presentation will describe the results of a costing-out study for California that address the two fundamental questions put forth above. The study employed a Professional Judgement approach, which involved organizing panels of expert educators to develop efficient resource specifications necessary to provide students in a variety of school settings (i.e., varying with respect to grade range, student needs, and enrollment size) an opportunity to meet outcomes defined in the state’s accountability system. The resource specifications were then translated into cost figures using a Resource Cost Model (RCM), which calculates costs based upon an “ingredients” approach (Levin, 2017). The data is then used to model the adequate cost for all California public K-12 schools and districts. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Michalopoulos, Charles ; Faucetta, Kristen ; Warren, Anne ; Mitchell, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Children from low-income families are more likely than those from higher-income families to have poor social, emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and health outcomes. One approach that has helped parents and their young children is home visiting, which provides information, resources, and support to expectant parents and families with young children. This brief summarizes evidence from existing studies on the impact of early childhood home visiting on children 5 and older for four national models of home visiting. (Author abstract)

    Children from low-income families are more likely than those from higher-income families to have poor social, emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and health outcomes. One approach that has helped parents and their young children is home visiting, which provides information, resources, and support to expectant parents and families with young children. This brief summarizes evidence from existing studies on the impact of early childhood home visiting on children 5 and older for four national models of home visiting. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Laurin, Alexandre; Milligan, Kevin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Many Canadian families with young children struggle with the cost of childcare. The tax system helps alleviate some of that burden. At the federal level, the Child Care Expense Deduction (CCED) allows eligible expenses to be deducted from taxable income. In most cases, expenses must be deducted on the return of the lower-income parent, whose claim cannot exceed two-thirds of income. The CCED is also applied provincially to reduce provincial taxes, except in Quebec where parents benefit from either a provincially subsidized childcare space or from an income-tested refundable tax credit. Most income tax systems give childcare expenditures special treatment, with different normative motivations in mind. Our approach is more in line with the optimal tax approach in that we evaluate different ways of subsidizing childcare through their contribution to improving efficiency and equity, rather than apply normative rules to determine a single "right" way to treat childcare in the tax system. (Author introduction)

    Many Canadian families with young children struggle with the cost of childcare. The tax system helps alleviate some of that burden. At the federal level, the Child Care Expense Deduction (CCED) allows eligible expenses to be deducted from taxable income. In most cases, expenses must be deducted on the return of the lower-income parent, whose claim cannot exceed two-thirds of income. The CCED is also applied provincially to reduce provincial taxes, except in Quebec where parents benefit from either a provincially subsidized childcare space or from an income-tested refundable tax credit. Most income tax systems give childcare expenditures special treatment, with different normative motivations in mind. Our approach is more in line with the optimal tax approach in that we evaluate different ways of subsidizing childcare through their contribution to improving efficiency and equity, rather than apply normative rules to determine a single "right" way to treat childcare in the tax system. (Author introduction)

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