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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hughes, Michelle; Tucker, Whitney
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Research demonstrates the correlation between childhood adversities linked to poverty and negative outcomes in adulthood, indicating that poverty may itself be considered an adverse childhood experience. Because child poverty is a result of family economic circumstance, policy investments promoting family financial health are imperative to protect child well-being and North Carolina's future prosperity. (Author abstract)

     

    Research demonstrates the correlation between childhood adversities linked to poverty and negative outcomes in adulthood, indicating that poverty may itself be considered an adverse childhood experience. Because child poverty is a result of family economic circumstance, policy investments promoting family financial health are imperative to protect child well-being and North Carolina's future prosperity. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Levy, Diane K.; Pratt, Eleanor; Waxman, Elaine; Allen, Eva H.; Kenney, Genevieve M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report presents information on the work requirements currently in use in TANF, SNAP, and federal housing assistance programs and discusses the available evidence on implementation experiences and impacts. It also describes Medicaid waiver requests currently under consideration at CMS that would include work requirements and closes by highlighting key questions for consideration when assessing the use of work requirements in safety net programs. For example, given the evidence that employment among families who are subject to current work requirements rarely pays high enough wages to move a family off assistance and out of poverty, what are the expected benefits of implementing new work requirements? (Author abstract) 

    This report presents information on the work requirements currently in use in TANF, SNAP, and federal housing assistance programs and discusses the available evidence on implementation experiences and impacts. It also describes Medicaid waiver requests currently under consideration at CMS that would include work requirements and closes by highlighting key questions for consideration when assessing the use of work requirements in safety net programs. For example, given the evidence that employment among families who are subject to current work requirements rarely pays high enough wages to move a family off assistance and out of poverty, what are the expected benefits of implementing new work requirements? (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Buitrago, Katie
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2017

    Permanent supportive housing providers interested in diversifying their funding sources may want to consider Medicaid as a way of supporting its services. The complexity involved with administering Medicaid can be a barrier for many PSH providers, however. In response to this issue, Heartland Alliance Health's (previously known as Heartland Health Outreach) Health Neighborhood Demonstration Project is implementing innovative ways to help permanent supportive housing providers benefit from Medicaid funding and improve health outcomes for HAH participants without having to take on the burdens of becoming Medicaid billers. The brief outlines the Health Neighborhood model and implementation, lessons learned, and key considerations for other organizations considering similar partnerships. (Author description)

    Permanent supportive housing providers interested in diversifying their funding sources may want to consider Medicaid as a way of supporting its services. The complexity involved with administering Medicaid can be a barrier for many PSH providers, however. In response to this issue, Heartland Alliance Health's (previously known as Heartland Health Outreach) Health Neighborhood Demonstration Project is implementing innovative ways to help permanent supportive housing providers benefit from Medicaid funding and improve health outcomes for HAH participants without having to take on the burdens of becoming Medicaid billers. The brief outlines the Health Neighborhood model and implementation, lessons learned, and key considerations for other organizations considering similar partnerships. (Author description)

  • Individual Author: Wilkins, Carol; Burt, Martha; Locke, Gretchen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Ample evidence documents the potential for people with complex health and behavioral health conditions who have been homeless to achieve housing stability, pursue recovery, manage chronic health conditions, and stay out of hospitals, if they receive appropriate health care, other services and supports, and care coordination. On January 1, 2014, in states that have chosen to expand Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act, nearly all chronically homeless people who lacked health insurance became eligible for Medicaid. Even in states that have not expanded their Medicaid programs, Medicaid still offers eligible beneficiaries experiencing homelessness critical health and supportive services. This Primer offers state Medicaid officials and other interested parties strategies for using Medicaid to meet the needs of this very vulnerable population - some strategies that have succeeded in the past and some that are emerging under provisions of the Affordable Care Act. (author abstract) 

    Ample evidence documents the potential for people with complex health and behavioral health conditions who have been homeless to achieve housing stability, pursue recovery, manage chronic health conditions, and stay out of hospitals, if they receive appropriate health care, other services and supports, and care coordination. On January 1, 2014, in states that have chosen to expand Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act, nearly all chronically homeless people who lacked health insurance became eligible for Medicaid. Even in states that have not expanded their Medicaid programs, Medicaid still offers eligible beneficiaries experiencing homelessness critical health and supportive services. This Primer offers state Medicaid officials and other interested parties strategies for using Medicaid to meet the needs of this very vulnerable population - some strategies that have succeeded in the past and some that are emerging under provisions of the Affordable Care Act. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Golden, Olivia; Loprest, Pamela J. ; Adams, Gina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

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