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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Cusack, Meagan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The HUD-VA Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program combines HUD’s housing choice vouchers, administered by public housing authorities (PHAs), with VA case management to offer homeless Veterans permanent supportive housing. The HUD-VASH Exit study, commissioned by HUD and VA, investigated HUD-VASH at four sites: Houston, TX; Los Angeles and Palo Alto, CA; and Philadelphia, PA. The study examined program implementation, the movement of Veterans from homelessness to being housed, and the nature of Veterans’ exits from HUD-VASH. To do this, the research team analyzed administrative data covering 2008 to 2014 at the four sites, and surveyed Veterans and conducted site visits (including interviews with staff and Veterans) between 2011 and 2014. As such the study captures HUD-VASH during a time of transformation. In 2008, HUD-VASH served fewer than 2,000 Veterans. By 2014, HUD-VASH was a major program that housed 53,000 Veterans and had served more than 80,000 Veterans. The study defined three HUD-VASH Veteran groups: (1) stayers (Veterans in the program for at least 600 days), (2) leased...

    The HUD-VA Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program combines HUD’s housing choice vouchers, administered by public housing authorities (PHAs), with VA case management to offer homeless Veterans permanent supportive housing. The HUD-VASH Exit study, commissioned by HUD and VA, investigated HUD-VASH at four sites: Houston, TX; Los Angeles and Palo Alto, CA; and Philadelphia, PA. The study examined program implementation, the movement of Veterans from homelessness to being housed, and the nature of Veterans’ exits from HUD-VASH. To do this, the research team analyzed administrative data covering 2008 to 2014 at the four sites, and surveyed Veterans and conducted site visits (including interviews with staff and Veterans) between 2011 and 2014. As such the study captures HUD-VASH during a time of transformation. In 2008, HUD-VASH served fewer than 2,000 Veterans. By 2014, HUD-VASH was a major program that housed 53,000 Veterans and had served more than 80,000 Veterans. The study defined three HUD-VASH Veteran groups: (1) stayers (Veterans in the program for at least 600 days), (2) leased-up exiters (Veterans who exited after leasing up), and (3) nonleased exiters (Veterans who exited before accessing housing). “Exit” was defined as leaving VA case management as recorded in VA administrative data by case managers. The study finds that about half of the leased-up exiters left HUD-VASH for positive reasons such as accomplishing their goals or increased income, but that only a quarter of nonleased exiters had positive reasons for exit. Common negative reasons for exit included housing difficulties, loss of contact with the program, illness, incarceration, and non-compliance with program rules. Specific recommendations to ensure continued program effectiveness converge around (1) improving coordination of HUD and VA processes in HUD-VASH sites; (2) targeting financial resources for specific situations such as move-in, threat of eviction, and transitioning out of HUD-VASH; and (3) ensuring continuity of care for Veterans in the program. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zaveri, Heather ; Holcomb, Pamela ; Baumgartner, Scott
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop summarizes early lessons learned from the PACT evaluation, focusing on the process study of four Responsible Fatherhood programs.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop summarizes early lessons learned from the PACT evaluation, focusing on the process study of four Responsible Fatherhood programs.

  • Individual Author: Williams, Sonya; Freedman, Stephen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The national Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) project tested the effectiveness of over a dozen innovative programs in eight states that were intended to promote steady work and earnings growth among current and former welfare recipients — that is, recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) — and other low-wage workers. The programs offered services primarily to single parents, but nine programs also offered services to adult members of two-parent families.

    This report describes the background characteristics, employment and earnings patterns, and patterns of TANF and food stamp receipt for adult members of two-parent families in the ERA sample. Not much is known about the low-income two-parent population’s need for employment retention and advancement services or about their responses to offered services. This population has particular policy relevance in that two-parent TANF cases include more family members and receive higher average monthly grants than do single-parent recipients. These families therefore require higher income (from...

    The national Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) project tested the effectiveness of over a dozen innovative programs in eight states that were intended to promote steady work and earnings growth among current and former welfare recipients — that is, recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) — and other low-wage workers. The programs offered services primarily to single parents, but nine programs also offered services to adult members of two-parent families.

    This report describes the background characteristics, employment and earnings patterns, and patterns of TANF and food stamp receipt for adult members of two-parent families in the ERA sample. Not much is known about the low-income two-parent population’s need for employment retention and advancement services or about their responses to offered services. This population has particular policy relevance in that two-parent TANF cases include more family members and receive higher average monthly grants than do single-parent recipients. These families therefore require higher income (from employment of one or both parents) to achieve self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sessoms, Nathan J.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2010

    Employing a mixed methodology, this dissertation investigates emerging trends in the spatial distribution of concentrated poverty and concentrated affluence at the nationstate, regional, and local levels of scale during the 1990s. Drawing from quantitative exploration of census data, including comparative analyses of spatial indices of segregation and multivariate regression analyses, it examines trends in poverty and affluence concentration through a comparative analysis of fifty of the nation's largest metropolitan areas, assesses the extent to which the concentration of poverty within suburban zones explains - and is explained by - concentration of affluence patterns, and questions the heterogeneity of concentrated poverty and affluence landscapes through an in-depth study of the Los Angeles metro-area. In addition, qualitative techniques, including structured observations, and photography are be utilized to further understand, illustrate, and articulate the material and lived social realities of landscapes of poverty and affluence concentration. Long regarded as an urban...

    Employing a mixed methodology, this dissertation investigates emerging trends in the spatial distribution of concentrated poverty and concentrated affluence at the nationstate, regional, and local levels of scale during the 1990s. Drawing from quantitative exploration of census data, including comparative analyses of spatial indices of segregation and multivariate regression analyses, it examines trends in poverty and affluence concentration through a comparative analysis of fifty of the nation's largest metropolitan areas, assesses the extent to which the concentration of poverty within suburban zones explains - and is explained by - concentration of affluence patterns, and questions the heterogeneity of concentrated poverty and affluence landscapes through an in-depth study of the Los Angeles metro-area. In addition, qualitative techniques, including structured observations, and photography are be utilized to further understand, illustrate, and articulate the material and lived social realities of landscapes of poverty and affluence concentration. Long regarded as an urban phenomenon and intimately linked to research focused on the Black Urban Underclass, the face and landscape of concentrated poverty has undergone dramatic changes. In stark contrast to its dramatic increase within urban areas during the 1970s and 1980s, recent research has highlighted its substantial decrease within the Midwest and Southern regions of the United States, while increasing within inner-suburban areas and, in particular, the West during the 1990s. Such findings portray concentrated poverty as a phenomenon that carries implications for not only urban areas, but entire regions as well. Moreover, they suggest that poor areas are becoming increasingly differentiated. Therefore, previous assumptions regarding their physical make-up and demographic composition may be in need of revision. Finally, they raise questions as to whether conventional methods of measurement may be unable to adequately depict the increasingly complex landscape of poverty, particularly in globalizing cities such as Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York. Meanwhile, in light of its predominant focus on the poor, their spatial distribution, and perceived behavioral tendencies, urban geographic scholarship has rarely discussed the notion of affluence concentration. Therefore, little is known about this particular stratum. However, in light of new developments in the spatial distribution of concentrated poverty, numerous questions regarding their spatial distribution, their social characteristics, as well as those of their physical landscapes, and their behavioral responses to the suburbanization of concentrated poverty remain which warrant further consideration. Finally, how might these responses impact poverty policy? These and related questions, although foundational, remain critical to the development of a greater understanding of emerging conditions of economic polarization. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Polit, Denise F.; Nelson, Laura; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Seith, David; Rich, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    The 1996 national welfare reform law imposed a five-year time limit on federally funded cash assistance, established stricter work requirements, and provided greater flexibility for states in designing and managing programs. This report — the last in a series from MDRC’s Project on Devolution and Urban Change — describes how welfare reform unfolded in Los Angeles County (particularly between 1998 and 2001) and compares welfare reform experiences and outcomes there with those in the other three Urban Change sites: Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Miami- Dade County, and Philadelphia.

    After presenting a digest of the study’s findings, this summary report offers background on the Urban Change study in Los Angeles, depicts the county’s demographic and economic environment, describes the implementation of welfare reform, explains the effects of reform on welfare receipt and employment and on the lives of welfare recipients, describes what happened in Los Angeles neighborhoods during welfare reform, and concludes with policy implications drawn from conclusions from all four Urban...

    The 1996 national welfare reform law imposed a five-year time limit on federally funded cash assistance, established stricter work requirements, and provided greater flexibility for states in designing and managing programs. This report — the last in a series from MDRC’s Project on Devolution and Urban Change — describes how welfare reform unfolded in Los Angeles County (particularly between 1998 and 2001) and compares welfare reform experiences and outcomes there with those in the other three Urban Change sites: Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Miami- Dade County, and Philadelphia.

    After presenting a digest of the study’s findings, this summary report offers background on the Urban Change study in Los Angeles, depicts the county’s demographic and economic environment, describes the implementation of welfare reform, explains the effects of reform on welfare receipt and employment and on the lives of welfare recipients, describes what happened in Los Angeles neighborhoods during welfare reform, and concludes with policy implications drawn from conclusions from all four Urban Change sites. (author abstract)

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