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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Allard, Scott
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Program accessibility and stability are critical components of any effort to cultivate greater capacity among faith-based and community-based social service organizations. Working poor populations are more likely to benefit from programs if they are nearby, easily accessible, and operate with consistency. Yet, we know very little about where faith-based service organizations (FBOs) and secular nonprofits are located, or whether certain types of providers exhibit more stability than others. Drawing on unique survey data on nonprofit service providers, this paper compares the characteristics of FBOs and secular organizations in several urban and rural communities. FBOs that integrate faith into service delivery and secular nonprofit organizations are more accessible to poor populations than FBOs that do not integrate religious elements into service provision. At the same time, I find that large percentages of FBOs and secular nonprofits experience funding volatility and program instability each year. (author abstract)

    Program accessibility and stability are critical components of any effort to cultivate greater capacity among faith-based and community-based social service organizations. Working poor populations are more likely to benefit from programs if they are nearby, easily accessible, and operate with consistency. Yet, we know very little about where faith-based service organizations (FBOs) and secular nonprofits are located, or whether certain types of providers exhibit more stability than others. Drawing on unique survey data on nonprofit service providers, this paper compares the characteristics of FBOs and secular organizations in several urban and rural communities. FBOs that integrate faith into service delivery and secular nonprofit organizations are more accessible to poor populations than FBOs that do not integrate religious elements into service provision. At the same time, I find that large percentages of FBOs and secular nonprofits experience funding volatility and program instability each year. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Layzer, Jean I.; Goodson, Barbara D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    The National Study of Child Care for Low-Income Families is a five-year research effort that will provide policy-makers with information on the effects of Federal, state and local policies and programs on child care at the community level, and the employment and child care decisions of low-income families. It will also provide insights into the characteristics and functioning of family child care, a type of care frequently used by low-income families, and the experiences of parents and their children with this form of care. Abt Associates Inc. of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University’s Joseph Mailman School of Public Health in New York City are conducting the study under contract to the Administration for Children & Families of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

    The study was initiated in the wake of sweeping welfare reform legislation enacted in 1996. It examines how states and communities implement policies and programs to meet the child care needs of families moving from welfare to work, as...

    The National Study of Child Care for Low-Income Families is a five-year research effort that will provide policy-makers with information on the effects of Federal, state and local policies and programs on child care at the community level, and the employment and child care decisions of low-income families. It will also provide insights into the characteristics and functioning of family child care, a type of care frequently used by low-income families, and the experiences of parents and their children with this form of care. Abt Associates Inc. of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University’s Joseph Mailman School of Public Health in New York City are conducting the study under contract to the Administration for Children & Families of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

    The study was initiated in the wake of sweeping welfare reform legislation enacted in 1996. It examines how states and communities implement policies and programs to meet the child care needs of families moving from welfare to work, as well as those of other low-income parents; how policies change over time; and how these policies, as well as other factors, affect the type, amount, and cost of care in communities. In addition, the study is investigating the factors that shape the child care decisions of low-income families and the role that child care subsidies play in those decisions. Finally, the study is examining, in depth and over a period of 2½ years, a group of families that use various kinds of family child care and their child care providers, to develop a better understanding of the family child care environment and the extent to which the care provided in that environment supports parents’ work-related needs and meets children’s needs for a safe, healthy and nurturing environment.

    To address these objectives, study staff gathered information from 17 states about the administration of child care and welfare policies and programs, and about resource allocations. Within the 17 states, the study gathered information from 25 communities about the implementation of state and local policies and the influence of those policies and practices on the local child care market and on low-income families. Information on states was collected three times: in 1999, 2001 and in 2002, and on communities four times over the same period to allow us to investigate change over time in policies and practices. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Algert, Susan J.; Agrawal, Aditya; Lewis, Douglas S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    Access to fresh produce and other healthy foods differs between poor ethnic and wealthier non-ethnic neighborhoods. Given the need to improve access, emergency food organizations, such as food pantries, can provide assistance. Food pantry clients, many living in poor ethnic neighborhoods, are at highest risk for inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables as emergency food assistance often does not include a supply of fresh produce. This study examines the extent to which food pantry clients live within reasonable walking distance of stores carrying fresh produce, and it proposes a strategy to increase accessibility of produce to those clients. Addresses for 3985 food pantry clients residing in Pomona, California, in 2003 and 84 food stores categorized as selling a “variety of produce” or “limited produce” were geocoded using geographic information systems technology in 2004. A 0.8-km network buffer was used to measure access to stores. Cluster areas with high densities of food pantry clients, or hot spots, were determined. Forty-one percent of Pomona food pantry clients were...

    Access to fresh produce and other healthy foods differs between poor ethnic and wealthier non-ethnic neighborhoods. Given the need to improve access, emergency food organizations, such as food pantries, can provide assistance. Food pantry clients, many living in poor ethnic neighborhoods, are at highest risk for inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables as emergency food assistance often does not include a supply of fresh produce. This study examines the extent to which food pantry clients live within reasonable walking distance of stores carrying fresh produce, and it proposes a strategy to increase accessibility of produce to those clients. Addresses for 3985 food pantry clients residing in Pomona, California, in 2003 and 84 food stores categorized as selling a “variety of produce” or “limited produce” were geocoded using geographic information systems technology in 2004. A 0.8-km network buffer was used to measure access to stores. Cluster areas with high densities of food pantry clients, or hot spots, were determined. Forty-one percent of Pomona food pantry clients were within walking distance of a store with fresh produce. Eighty-three percent were within walking distance of stores with limited produce, and 13% were not within walking distance of either store type. Seventeen cluster areas of food pantry clients accounted for 48% of clients with no access to a produce store. Using individual-level data allowed for the identification of significant numbers of food pantry clients with limited access to stores carrying a variety of fresh produce. Identification of the location of high concentrations of food pantry clients provides a potential solution to increase fresh fruit and vegetable access via mobile produce trucks. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Polit, Denise F.; Nelson, Laura; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Seith, David; Rich, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    The 1996 national welfare reform law imposed a five-year time limit on federally funded cash assistance, established stricter work requirements, and provided greater flexibility for states in designing and managing programs. This report — the last in a series from MDRC’s Project on Devolution and Urban Change — describes how welfare reform unfolded in Los Angeles County (particularly between 1998 and 2001) and compares welfare reform experiences and outcomes there with those in the other three Urban Change sites: Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Miami- Dade County, and Philadelphia.

    After presenting a digest of the study’s findings, this summary report offers background on the Urban Change study in Los Angeles, depicts the county’s demographic and economic environment, describes the implementation of welfare reform, explains the effects of reform on welfare receipt and employment and on the lives of welfare recipients, describes what happened in Los Angeles neighborhoods during welfare reform, and concludes with policy implications drawn from conclusions from all four Urban...

    The 1996 national welfare reform law imposed a five-year time limit on federally funded cash assistance, established stricter work requirements, and provided greater flexibility for states in designing and managing programs. This report — the last in a series from MDRC’s Project on Devolution and Urban Change — describes how welfare reform unfolded in Los Angeles County (particularly between 1998 and 2001) and compares welfare reform experiences and outcomes there with those in the other three Urban Change sites: Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Miami- Dade County, and Philadelphia.

    After presenting a digest of the study’s findings, this summary report offers background on the Urban Change study in Los Angeles, depicts the county’s demographic and economic environment, describes the implementation of welfare reform, explains the effects of reform on welfare receipt and employment and on the lives of welfare recipients, describes what happened in Los Angeles neighborhoods during welfare reform, and concludes with policy implications drawn from conclusions from all four Urban Change sites. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bono, Michael; Toros, Halil
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    On January 4, 2005, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors requested that DPSS provide more information on homeless CalWORKs families. In response to this request, DPSS developed a two-pronged strategy, in collaboration with the Service Integration Branch of the Los Angeles County Chief Administrative Office: (1) a detailed analysis of administrative data for all families who received CalWORKs in Los Angeles County between September and November 2004; and (2) a survey of 373 CalWORKs participants who applied for special assistance for homelessness during the week of February 22 through February 28, 2005.

    The identification of homeless families is a complex issue. Unlike the recent effort by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to observe and count homeless persons in our communities, DPSS relies on a participant’s self-disclosure of homelessness to a worker to identify a family as homeless and respond to a family’s housing crisis with special assistance.

    PART I of this report describes findings from analyses of the administrative caseload data,...

    On January 4, 2005, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors requested that DPSS provide more information on homeless CalWORKs families. In response to this request, DPSS developed a two-pronged strategy, in collaboration with the Service Integration Branch of the Los Angeles County Chief Administrative Office: (1) a detailed analysis of administrative data for all families who received CalWORKs in Los Angeles County between September and November 2004; and (2) a survey of 373 CalWORKs participants who applied for special assistance for homelessness during the week of February 22 through February 28, 2005.

    The identification of homeless families is a complex issue. Unlike the recent effort by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to observe and count homeless persons in our communities, DPSS relies on a participant’s self-disclosure of homelessness to a worker to identify a family as homeless and respond to a family’s housing crisis with special assistance.

    PART I of this report describes findings from analyses of the administrative caseload data, and PART II describes results from the participant survey. Taken together, this data presents the most detailed information ever compiled regarding CalWORKs homeless families in Los Angeles County. (author abstract)

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