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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Tippett, Rebecca M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Household economic security is the capacity of households to afford day-to-day expenditures, save for the future, and survive financial emergencies, such as illness, job loss, or divorce. While important to individuals and families, the benefits of economic security extend beyond household walls. Economically secure households are less likely to rely on local and state social services. Additionally, children and parents in economically secure families have better physical and mental health, which leads to stronger families, improved school performance, and higher workplace productivity. Building economic security for all households will improve economic outcomes for both Virginia’s families and the Commonwealth.

    This paper introduces household economic security as a broader perspective on individual and community well-being and examines two fundamental dimensions of household economic health: adequate income and adequate savings (assets). By examining data on income and assets, the following questions can be addressed:

    • How do we accurately measure the economic...

    Household economic security is the capacity of households to afford day-to-day expenditures, save for the future, and survive financial emergencies, such as illness, job loss, or divorce. While important to individuals and families, the benefits of economic security extend beyond household walls. Economically secure households are less likely to rely on local and state social services. Additionally, children and parents in economically secure families have better physical and mental health, which leads to stronger families, improved school performance, and higher workplace productivity. Building economic security for all households will improve economic outcomes for both Virginia’s families and the Commonwealth.

    This paper introduces household economic security as a broader perspective on individual and community well-being and examines two fundamental dimensions of household economic health: adequate income and adequate savings (assets). By examining data on income and assets, the following questions can be addressed:

    • How do we accurately measure the economic security of Virginians?
    • How much money does it take to “get by” in Virginia?
    • Are Virginia’s families prepared for financial emergencies?
    • What can we do to improve the economic security of Virginia’s families? (author introduction)