Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Dreyer, Benard P.; James-Brown, Christine
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2019

    This presentation was given at the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop in 2019. The presentation, moderated by Edith Kealey, provides an overview of opportunities to reduce child poverty via measure such as expanding tax credits and food assistance programs and the impact of various potential packages of programs, including a case study of a package employed in Louisiana. 

    This presentation was given at the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop in 2019. The presentation, moderated by Edith Kealey, provides an overview of opportunities to reduce child poverty via measure such as expanding tax credits and food assistance programs and the impact of various potential packages of programs, including a case study of a package employed in Louisiana. 

  • Individual Author: Blagg, Kristin; Chingos, Matthew; Corcoran, Sean P.; Cordes, Sarah A.; Cowen, Joshua; Denice, Patrick ; Gross, Betheny; Lincove, Jane Arnold ; Sattin-Bajaj, Carolyn; Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Valant, Jon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    How to get to school is an important issue for families who want to send their children to schools outside their neighborhood and for education policymakers seeking to implement school choice policies that mitigate educational inequality. We analyze travel times between the homes and schools of nearly 190,000 students across five large US cities that offer a significant amount of educational choice:  Denver, Detroit, New Orleans, New York City, and Washington, DC. We find: 

    • Despite wide variation across cities in student transportation policy, there are similar student transportation patterns across our cities. Most students live within a 20-minute drive from home to their school. Older students travel farther to school than younger students, and black students travel farther than white or Hispanic students. Students who are not low income tend to travel farther than their low-income peers.
    • Particularly among older students, those enrolled in traditional public schools tend to travel as far, or in some cases farther, than those attending charter schools....

    How to get to school is an important issue for families who want to send their children to schools outside their neighborhood and for education policymakers seeking to implement school choice policies that mitigate educational inequality. We analyze travel times between the homes and schools of nearly 190,000 students across five large US cities that offer a significant amount of educational choice:  Denver, Detroit, New Orleans, New York City, and Washington, DC. We find: 

    • Despite wide variation across cities in student transportation policy, there are similar student transportation patterns across our cities. Most students live within a 20-minute drive from home to their school. Older students travel farther to school than younger students, and black students travel farther than white or Hispanic students. Students who are not low income tend to travel farther than their low-income peers.
    • Particularly among older students, those enrolled in traditional public schools tend to travel as far, or in some cases farther, than those attending charter schools.
    • Access to “high quality” high schools varies across cities, race and ethnicity, and on the quality measure used. However, ninth-grade students, on average, tend to live about a 10-minute drive from a “high quality” high school.
    • Access to a car can significantly increase the number of schools available to a family. Typical travel times to school by public transit are significantly greater than by car, especially in cities with less efficient transit networks.

    Just as there are inequalities and differences in students’ academic performance across these cities, we see parallel inequalities and differences in the distances that students travel and in the availability of nearby school options. Experiments in targeted policy interventions, such as implementing transportation vouchers for low-income parents of very young students, using yellow buses on circulating routes, or changing the way that school siting decisions are made, might yield pragmatic solutions that further level the playing field for a city’s most disadvantaged students. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Crowder Jr., James A.; Scoggins, Justin; Treuhaft, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    While Louisiana’s economy has improved in recent years, people of color are still disproportionately represented among the state’s economically insecure. Men of color face particular barriers to employment due to discrimination and gaps in work-based skills. If full employment was achieved across all gender and racial groups, Louisiana's economy could be $3.5 billion stronger each year. Investing in men of color and critical education and training systems for Louisiana’s workforce will shift the state toward a course for greater prosperity for all. This brief is the fifth and final in a series about employment equity in the South (following analyses produced for Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina) based on data analysis and modeling of a “full-employment economy” (defined as when everyone who wants a job can find one), which was conducted by the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) at the University of Southern California as well as policy research and focus groups conducted by PolicyLink and the Louisiana Power Coalition for Equity and Justice,...

    While Louisiana’s economy has improved in recent years, people of color are still disproportionately represented among the state’s economically insecure. Men of color face particular barriers to employment due to discrimination and gaps in work-based skills. If full employment was achieved across all gender and racial groups, Louisiana's economy could be $3.5 billion stronger each year. Investing in men of color and critical education and training systems for Louisiana’s workforce will shift the state toward a course for greater prosperity for all. This brief is the fifth and final in a series about employment equity in the South (following analyses produced for Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina) based on data analysis and modeling of a “full-employment economy” (defined as when everyone who wants a job can find one), which was conducted by the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) at the University of Southern California as well as policy research and focus groups conducted by PolicyLink and the Louisiana Power Coalition for Equity and Justice, with support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. (Author overview)

     

  • Individual Author: Wolf, Patrick J.; Mills, Jonathan N. ; Lee, Matthew
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    The Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) is a school voucher program that offers publicly-funded scholarships to students from economically-disadvantaged families to attend a participating private school of their choice. Originally launched as a pilot project in New Orleans in 2008, the initiative was expanded statewide in 2012. A total of 9,736 eligible students applied to the voucher program for the 2012-13 school year and 5,296 received LSP vouchers. Market theory suggests that student outcomes should improve when educational choices are expanded. Market critics, however, predict that access to private schools of choice will have negative or null effects on student outcomes.

    This paper examines how LPS scholarship usage affected student achievement after four and five years of participation. While initial research indicated negative achievement effects after one year of participation, impact estimates attenuated somewhat by year two. The results after three years are inconclusive and might reasonably be null or even positive given the high level of statistical...

    The Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) is a school voucher program that offers publicly-funded scholarships to students from economically-disadvantaged families to attend a participating private school of their choice. Originally launched as a pilot project in New Orleans in 2008, the initiative was expanded statewide in 2012. A total of 9,736 eligible students applied to the voucher program for the 2012-13 school year and 5,296 received LSP vouchers. Market theory suggests that student outcomes should improve when educational choices are expanded. Market critics, however, predict that access to private schools of choice will have negative or null effects on student outcomes.

    This paper examines how LPS scholarship usage affected student achievement after four and five years of participation. While initial research indicated negative achievement effects after one year of participation, impact estimates attenuated somewhat by year two. The results after three years are inconclusive and might reasonably be null or even positive given the high level of statistical uncertainty involved.

    This paper extends this work by estimating achievement effects of the LSP after 4 and 5 years for a consistent sample of students in the 2012-13 cohort. Our analysis uses oversubscription lotteries for the eligible applicants to estimate the LSP achievement impacts as a randomized control trial (RCT). Admission lotteries are used as instrumental variables to estimate the effect of using an LSP scholarship to enroll in one’s first-choice private school for applicants induced to attend a private school as a result of winning the lottery. Our analysis uses student-level data obtained via a data-sharing agreement with the state of Louisiana, with achievement measured by student performance on the criterion-referenced tests mandated by the state for public school accountability purposes.

    We examine overall effects, as well as the extent to which effects are moderated by student gender, race, and level of baseline performance. In addition, we conduct an exploratory analysis investigating if the test score impacts of the LSP are mediated by the chosen private school’s religious affiliation, geographic location, school tuition, enrollment, student-teacher ratio, instructional hours, or student demographics. This new exploratory element of our on-going evaluation will provide suggestive evidence regarding the kinds of schools in which LSP students are experiencing relatively higher or lower achievement effects from the program.

    This study benefits the existing literature on the participant effects of publicly funded voucher programs for three reasons. First, it uses a highly rigorous experimental design to estimate treatment effects while avoiding endogeneity concerns. Second, this study will provide a more detailed understanding of the persistence of the negative effects estimated in the year-one impact evaluation of the LSP. Finally, by exploring how effects are mediated by school characteristics, this study contributes to a comprehensive understanding of one of the largest private school voucher programs in the United States. These contributions will add to the existing knowledge on the effects of publicly funded voucher programs. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Shattuck, Rachel M.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2004 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations