Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Denny-Brown, Noelle; Livermore, Gina; Shenk, Marisa; Morris, Eric
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The SourceAmerica Pathways to Careers™ (Pathways) initiative relies upon state-of-the-art employment strategies to enable people with significant disabilities to have an informed choice of competitive, integrated, full-wage employment options that match their individual skills, interests, and abilities. In this report, we document the activities of the pilot Pathways project in Utah and the experiences of participants from the time this pilot project launched in May 2012 through December 2016, the fourth full year of implementation. During that time, the project enrolled 91 participants. This is the third of four primary reports that will describe the findings of the Pathways evaluation. The evaluation findings presented in this report are based on information collected from the project management information system; participant applications and follow-up surveys conducted 12 and 24 months after intake; and in-person interviews with staff and employers participating in the pilot Pathways project in Utah. We also analyzed project cost information and data on how Pathways staff in...

    The SourceAmerica Pathways to Careers™ (Pathways) initiative relies upon state-of-the-art employment strategies to enable people with significant disabilities to have an informed choice of competitive, integrated, full-wage employment options that match their individual skills, interests, and abilities. In this report, we document the activities of the pilot Pathways project in Utah and the experiences of participants from the time this pilot project launched in May 2012 through December 2016, the fourth full year of implementation. During that time, the project enrolled 91 participants. This is the third of four primary reports that will describe the findings of the Pathways evaluation. The evaluation findings presented in this report are based on information collected from the project management information system; participant applications and follow-up surveys conducted 12 and 24 months after intake; and in-person interviews with staff and employers participating in the pilot Pathways project in Utah. We also analyzed project cost information and data on how Pathways staff in the pilot project spend their time across various Pathways and non-Pathways activities. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Walton, Douglas; Wood, Michelle; Dunton, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This series of research briefs explores issues of family homelessness that are especially relevant to HHS, to state and local decision makers, and for programs. The Child Separation among Families Experiencing Homelessness brief explores child separations among families experiencing homelessness. It builds upon the fourth brief in this series, “Child and Partner Transitions among Families Experiencing Homelessness,” which looked at family separations and reunifications in the 20 months after being in emergency shelter and the association between family separation and recent housing instability following an initial shelter stay. This new brief provides a more detailed examination of these families and their children before and after the initial shelter stay, revealing more extensive and persistent levels of child separation. It gives detailed characteristics of separated children and examines whether future child separation after a shelter stay is related to either housing instability of previous separations. (Author abstract)

     

    This series of research briefs explores issues of family homelessness that are especially relevant to HHS, to state and local decision makers, and for programs. The Child Separation among Families Experiencing Homelessness brief explores child separations among families experiencing homelessness. It builds upon the fourth brief in this series, “Child and Partner Transitions among Families Experiencing Homelessness,” which looked at family separations and reunifications in the 20 months after being in emergency shelter and the association between family separation and recent housing instability following an initial shelter stay. This new brief provides a more detailed examination of these families and their children before and after the initial shelter stay, revealing more extensive and persistent levels of child separation. It gives detailed characteristics of separated children and examines whether future child separation after a shelter stay is related to either housing instability of previous separations. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Murphy, Lauren; Zief, Susan; Hulsey, Lara
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Introduction

    This brief summarizes key characteristics of programs funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) that reported at least half of the youth they served were adjudicated youth. PREP, which aims to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors, is administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Funding is awarded to states and territories through formula grants (State PREP), and through a competitive process to tribes and tribal entities (Tribal PREP) and to direct service providers in states and territories that did not take State PREP funding (Competitive PREP).

    Purpose

    This brief is one in a series that will inform stakeholders and the public about the PREP program.

    Key Findings and Highlights

    Seventy-two programs across 24 states and territories reported primarily serving adjudicated youth. These...

    Introduction

    This brief summarizes key characteristics of programs funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) that reported at least half of the youth they served were adjudicated youth. PREP, which aims to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors, is administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Funding is awarded to states and territories through formula grants (State PREP), and through a competitive process to tribes and tribal entities (Tribal PREP) and to direct service providers in states and territories that did not take State PREP funding (Competitive PREP).

    Purpose

    This brief is one in a series that will inform stakeholders and the public about the PREP program.

    Key Findings and Highlights

    Seventy-two programs across 24 states and territories reported primarily serving adjudicated youth. These programs served about 8,000 youth each year, largely through juvenile detention centers. Most youth in these programs reported being White or Black or African American, and most were ages 15 to 18. About three-quarters of youth reported being sexually active before entering the program. After PREP, more than one-third of the youth in these programs reported they were less likely to have sex in the next six months, and a large majority reported they were more likely to use condoms and birth control if they have sex.

    Methods

    PREP grantees submit performance measures data to ACF each year. These findings are based on performance measures data submitted by State PREP, Tribal PREP, and Competitive PREP grantees for the 2014–2015 reporting period. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Shinn, Marybeth; Gubits, Daniel ; Dunton, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

    This brief builds on previous research by describing the behavioral health problems reported by 2,020 parents—including some fathers—at the outset of a shelter stay with their children and the association of these problems with parents’ prior experiences. For the purposes of this brief, behavioral health includes psychological distress, alcohol dependence, drug abuse, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).The brief then looks at changes in the parents’ behavioral health problems over the next 37 months and how those changes were related to housing stability following the episode of homelessness. (...

    The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

    This brief builds on previous research by describing the behavioral health problems reported by 2,020 parents—including some fathers—at the outset of a shelter stay with their children and the association of these problems with parents’ prior experiences. For the purposes of this brief, behavioral health includes psychological distress, alcohol dependence, drug abuse, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).The brief then looks at changes in the parents’ behavioral health problems over the next 37 months and how those changes were related to housing stability following the episode of homelessness. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Benton, Amanda; Dunton, Lauren; Khadduri, Jill; Walton, Douglas
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2003 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations