Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Redcross, Cindy; Barden, Bret; Bloom, Dan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report presents interim impact and implementation findings of seven transitional jobs programs from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration. Two of the sites in that study — in Atlanta and San Francisco — are also a part of ACF’s Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration. The two studies closely coordinated beyond the shared sites, including shared reports, common data collection instruments, and other ongoing collaboration.

    The report shares early results in the areas of implementation, employment outcomes, recidivism, and child support payment.

    Early results include:

    • The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration programs were relatively well implemented.
    • All but one of the programs generated large increases in employment in the early months of follow-up; however, these increases were mostly or entirely the result of the transitional jobs and faded as participants left those jobs.
    • Two of the three programs targeting people recently released from prison appear to have reduced recidivism....

    This report presents interim impact and implementation findings of seven transitional jobs programs from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration. Two of the sites in that study — in Atlanta and San Francisco — are also a part of ACF’s Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration. The two studies closely coordinated beyond the shared sites, including shared reports, common data collection instruments, and other ongoing collaboration.

    The report shares early results in the areas of implementation, employment outcomes, recidivism, and child support payment.

    Early results include:

    • The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration programs were relatively well implemented.
    • All but one of the programs generated large increases in employment in the early months of follow-up; however, these increases were mostly or entirely the result of the transitional jobs and faded as participants left those jobs.
    • Two of the three programs targeting people recently released from prison appear to have reduced recidivism.
    • Most programs increased payment of child support. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Courtney, Mark; Dworsky, Amy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    A major goal of the federal welfare reform legislation that was enacted in 1996 was to end welfare dependence by moving cash assistance recipients and potential recipients into the paid labor force. In theory, state Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs would provide low-income parents with the services they needed to become and remain employed, which would then lead to increased self-sufficiency.

    Nearly 10 years later, with state cash assistance caseloads at historic lows, it seems reasonable to ask about the extent to which this has occurred. What has happened to the families that came to their state TANF programs looking for assistance? How many are employed? Are they finding stable jobs? How much are they earning? Is it enough for their families to escape poverty? And are they moving towards greater economic self sufficiency?

    Answering these questions is critical not only for understanding the well-being of families in the wake of welfare reform, but also for measuring of the success of state and federal welfare reforms. It is also...

    A major goal of the federal welfare reform legislation that was enacted in 1996 was to end welfare dependence by moving cash assistance recipients and potential recipients into the paid labor force. In theory, state Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs would provide low-income parents with the services they needed to become and remain employed, which would then lead to increased self-sufficiency.

    Nearly 10 years later, with state cash assistance caseloads at historic lows, it seems reasonable to ask about the extent to which this has occurred. What has happened to the families that came to their state TANF programs looking for assistance? How many are employed? Are they finding stable jobs? How much are they earning? Is it enough for their families to escape poverty? And are they moving towards greater economic self sufficiency?

    Answering these questions is critical not only for understanding the well-being of families in the wake of welfare reform, but also for measuring of the success of state and federal welfare reforms. It is also particularly timely, given recent federal legislation that will require a much higher percentage of each state’s TANF recipients to be engaged in work activities This paper draws upon findings from the Milwaukee TANF Applicant Study (see box for a description of the study) to provide some answers.

    This paper examines the labor market outcomes of study participants in the years 1997 through 2003. It focuses on the percentage of study participants who were employed in each of those years as well as the earnings of those who were employed. All of the findings are based on data from Wisconsin’s wage reporting system, which tracks quarterly earnings from employment covered under the state’s unemployment insurance laws. Despite the emphasis that both state and federal welfare policies place on increasing labor force participation, we find that many of the TANF applicants in our sample experienced one or more quarters in which they were not employed, and the percentage who were employed in any year actually declined over time. Moreover, although the median earnings of those who were employed more than doubled between 1997 and 2003, most of those who worked did not earn enough to escape poverty. The paper concludes with policy recommendations based on these results. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2006 to 2016

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations