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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: McKernan, Signe-Mary; Ratcliffe, Caroline; Shanks, Trina Williams
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2012

    Is poverty incompatible with asset accumulation? We examine whether the poor can and do save and whether they are able to build up assets over time. Data are presented from household surveys, as well as from programs targeted at helping families accumulate assets. Presenting and evaluating the state of knowledge provides a new lens on whether the current income-based safety net could better serve poor families by having an asset building component. Conventional thinking is that families that are income poor cannot save. This chapter shows that this thinking is inaccurate; poverty does not have to be incompatible with asset accumulation. (author abstract)

     

    Is poverty incompatible with asset accumulation? We examine whether the poor can and do save and whether they are able to build up assets over time. Data are presented from household surveys, as well as from programs targeted at helping families accumulate assets. Presenting and evaluating the state of knowledge provides a new lens on whether the current income-based safety net could better serve poor families by having an asset building component. Conventional thinking is that families that are income poor cannot save. This chapter shows that this thinking is inaccurate; poverty does not have to be incompatible with asset accumulation. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Duncan, Greg J.; Bergman, Lars; Duckworth, Kathryn; Kokko, Katja; Lyyra, Anna-Liisa; Metzger, Molly; Pulkkinen, Lea; Simonton, Sharon
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2012

    Under what conditions can parents succeed in passing their socioeconomic advantages on to their children by boosting their children’s job-related skills and behaviors? In equal opportunity societies, institutions and other policies boost the skills and behaviors of low-socioeconomic status (SES) children in ways that fully offset the skill and behavioral advantages imparted by parent efforts. Unequal opportunity societies—those allowing school and neighborhood quality to reinforce family advantage and disadvantage— should see growing skill and behavior gaps between high- and low-SES children across childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood—and substantial intergenerational inequality.

    This chapter focuses on the indirect skill- and behavior-based process of intergenerational inequality using five data sets from four countries: the United Kingdom, the United States, Sweden, and Finland. All of our data sets provide representative samples of children drawn from national or large community populations; measure the completed schooling of parents and children; and, most...

    Under what conditions can parents succeed in passing their socioeconomic advantages on to their children by boosting their children’s job-related skills and behaviors? In equal opportunity societies, institutions and other policies boost the skills and behaviors of low-socioeconomic status (SES) children in ways that fully offset the skill and behavioral advantages imparted by parent efforts. Unequal opportunity societies—those allowing school and neighborhood quality to reinforce family advantage and disadvantage— should see growing skill and behavior gaps between high- and low-SES children across childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood—and substantial intergenerational inequality.

    This chapter focuses on the indirect skill- and behavior-based process of intergenerational inequality using five data sets from four countries: the United Kingdom, the United States, Sweden, and Finland. All of our data sets provide representative samples of children drawn from national or large community populations; measure the completed schooling of parents and children; and, most important, measure an assortment of important skills and behaviors in both middle childhood (ages seven and ten) and adolescence (age thirteen through sixteen).

    Our key objective is to estimate cross-country differences in the extent to which child skills and behaviors account for intergenerational correlations in the completed schooling of parents and their grown children. The mediational role of children’s skills and behaviors is, in turn, a product of two factors: how strongly parent SES determines children’s skills and behaviors and the importance of children’s skills and behaviors for their adult attainments. Both factors need to be at work if skills and behaviors are to play an important mediational role. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Svallfors, Stefan
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2005

    Analyzing Inequality summarizes key issues in today's theoretically guided empirical research on social inequality, life course, and cross-national comparative sociology. It describes the progress made in terms of data sources, both cross-sectional and longitudinal; the new instruments that make inequality research possible; new ways of thinking and explaining; and empirical findings or important contributions of rigorous empirical research to our understanding.

    The chapters, each written by a distinguished social scientist, are of interest to both scholars and students. This is the only book to date to take stock of the state of the art in stratification research, examining data, methods, theory, and new empirical findings. Analyzing Inequality offers an unusually and impressively broad coverage of substantive topics in the field. (publisher abstract)

    Table of Contents

    Preface

    1. Introduction, by Stefan Svallfors

    2. Life Courses and Life Chances in a Comparative Perspective, by Karl Ulrich Mayer

    3....

    Analyzing Inequality summarizes key issues in today's theoretically guided empirical research on social inequality, life course, and cross-national comparative sociology. It describes the progress made in terms of data sources, both cross-sectional and longitudinal; the new instruments that make inequality research possible; new ways of thinking and explaining; and empirical findings or important contributions of rigorous empirical research to our understanding.

    The chapters, each written by a distinguished social scientist, are of interest to both scholars and students. This is the only book to date to take stock of the state of the art in stratification research, examining data, methods, theory, and new empirical findings. Analyzing Inequality offers an unusually and impressively broad coverage of substantive topics in the field. (publisher abstract)

    Table of Contents

    Preface

    1. Introduction, by Stefan Svallfors

    2. Life Courses and Life Chances in a Comparative Perspective, by Karl Ulrich Mayer

    3. Progress in Sociology: The Case of Social Mobility Research, by John H. Goldthorpe

    4. Social Indicators, Policy, and Measuring Progress, by A. B. Atkinson

    5. Family Structure, Gender Roles, and Social Inequality, by Annemette Sørensen

    6. Inequalities in Later Life: Gender, Marital Status, and Health Behaviors, by Sara Arber