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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Kuehn, Daniel; Hassani, Hannah; Edin, Kathryn
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    This report was updated on August 28, 2019. On page vi, the share of child support payments in California that is owed to the government was changed from 70 percent to 40 percent to reflect the most recent data. On page 2, “In San Francisco” was changed to “According to the San Francisco Department of Child Support Services” to clarify the source of the percentage in the first paragraph. (author abstract)

    This report was updated on August 28, 2019. On page vi, the share of child support payments in California that is owed to the government was changed from 70 percent to 40 percent to reflect the most recent data. On page 2, “In San Francisco” was changed to “According to the San Francisco Department of Child Support Services” to clarify the source of the percentage in the first paragraph. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gerrish, Ed
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    This paper examines the impact of the Child Support Performance and Incentive Act (CSPIA) of 1998 on child support performance measures that are rewarded financially as well as outcomes that are not rewarded. Three of the five performance measures explicitly rewarded by CSPIA are reconstructed in this analysis, as are two child support outcomes that were considered for financial rewards but were ultimately rejected. Using a panel interrupted time series model with state fixed effects and state-specific trends, this analysis finds that CSPIA had a statistically positive impact on just one rewarded performance goal, cost-effectiveness, and negatively impacted an unrewarded child support outcome—collections sent to other states. Effect sizes suggest that CSPIA had little impact on child support performance, on balance. These results provide more evidence to the ongoing debate about the ability of performance incentives to improve public sector performance. It also suggests that reforming performance systems in response to perceived problems may create new gaming responses. (Author...

    This paper examines the impact of the Child Support Performance and Incentive Act (CSPIA) of 1998 on child support performance measures that are rewarded financially as well as outcomes that are not rewarded. Three of the five performance measures explicitly rewarded by CSPIA are reconstructed in this analysis, as are two child support outcomes that were considered for financial rewards but were ultimately rejected. Using a panel interrupted time series model with state fixed effects and state-specific trends, this analysis finds that CSPIA had a statistically positive impact on just one rewarded performance goal, cost-effectiveness, and negatively impacted an unrewarded child support outcome—collections sent to other states. Effect sizes suggest that CSPIA had little impact on child support performance, on balance. These results provide more evidence to the ongoing debate about the ability of performance incentives to improve public sector performance. It also suggests that reforming performance systems in response to perceived problems may create new gaming responses. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sorenson, Elaine
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    The article presents information on a study which examines the income profile of nonresident fathers in the United States and their ability to pay child support. In this study data from the 1987-1988 National Survey of Families and Households and the 1990 Survey of Income and Program Participation were analyzed. This study provides a demographic and economic profile of nonresident fathers who self-report in the surveys, as well as all nonresident fathers, including those who are missed by these surveys. Also, in this study the author contrasts the characteristics of nonresident fathers with those of custodial mothers and resident fathers. In the end he estimates how much more child support nonresident fathers could potentially pay. To ascertain the extent to which nonresident fathers are underrepresented in these surveys, the author compares the number of children that nonresident fathers report living elsewhere with the number reported by custodial mothers. Finally, the estimates of the ability of nonresident fathers to pay child support have not taken into account that...

    The article presents information on a study which examines the income profile of nonresident fathers in the United States and their ability to pay child support. In this study data from the 1987-1988 National Survey of Families and Households and the 1990 Survey of Income and Program Participation were analyzed. This study provides a demographic and economic profile of nonresident fathers who self-report in the surveys, as well as all nonresident fathers, including those who are missed by these surveys. Also, in this study the author contrasts the characteristics of nonresident fathers with those of custodial mothers and resident fathers. In the end he estimates how much more child support nonresident fathers could potentially pay. To ascertain the extent to which nonresident fathers are underrepresented in these surveys, the author compares the number of children that nonresident fathers report living elsewhere with the number reported by custodial mothers. Finally, the estimates of the ability of nonresident fathers to pay child support have not taken into account that nonresident fathers could respond to higher child support requirements by decreasing their hours worked and thus reducing their ability to pay child support (author abstract).