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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Warren, Molly; Beck, Stacy; Rayburn, Jack
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The annual State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America report provides the latest data on obesity and related health conditions, as well as 40 policy and practice recommendations from Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (Author summary)

    The annual State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America report provides the latest data on obesity and related health conditions, as well as 40 policy and practice recommendations from Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (Author summary)

  • Individual Author: Adams, Gina; Spaulding, Shayne
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2018

    Work requirements for key safety net programs are currently being discussed across the country. It is important that this debate be based on an understanding of what recipients need to meet those requirements and to successfully place themselves on a path toward self-sufficiency. Among those potentially subject to work requirements are low-income parents with limited education and low skills who need education and training to find and keep stable jobs. However, a lack of quality, affordable child care often stands in their way. To inform current policy deliberations, we have compiled research insights about meeting the child care needs of low-income parents seeking education and job training from the dozen studies produced under Urban Institute’s “Bridging the Gap: Exploring the Intersection between Child Care and Workforce Development for Low-Income Parents” project. This brief highlights key insights for policymakers and lays out further questions to be explored. (Author abstract)

     

     

     

    Work requirements for key safety net programs are currently being discussed across the country. It is important that this debate be based on an understanding of what recipients need to meet those requirements and to successfully place themselves on a path toward self-sufficiency. Among those potentially subject to work requirements are low-income parents with limited education and low skills who need education and training to find and keep stable jobs. However, a lack of quality, affordable child care often stands in their way. To inform current policy deliberations, we have compiled research insights about meeting the child care needs of low-income parents seeking education and job training from the dozen studies produced under Urban Institute’s “Bridging the Gap: Exploring the Intersection between Child Care and Workforce Development for Low-Income Parents” project. This brief highlights key insights for policymakers and lays out further questions to be explored. (Author abstract)

     

     

     

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Adams, Gina; Spaulding, Shayne; Heller, Caroline
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Low-income families receiving cash assistance through Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) also need assistance with workforce development and child care. Workforce development and child care subsidy systems support low-income families and individuals, but are TANF families well served by these systems? This report outlines the opportunities that the workforce development and child care subsidy systems offer, highlights the challenges of meeting the complex needs of these highly disadvantaged families, and identifies implications for federal and state policy improvements. (Author abstract)

    Low-income families receiving cash assistance through Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) also need assistance with workforce development and child care. Workforce development and child care subsidy systems support low-income families and individuals, but are TANF families well served by these systems? This report outlines the opportunities that the workforce development and child care subsidy systems offer, highlights the challenges of meeting the complex needs of these highly disadvantaged families, and identifies implications for federal and state policy improvements. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Marr, Chuck; Huang, Chye-Ching; Sherman, Arlock; DeBot, Brandon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit (CTC), which go to millions of low- and moderate-income working families each year, provide work, income, educational, and health benefits to its recipients and their children, a substantial body of research shows.  In addition, recent ground-breaking research suggests the income from these credits leads to benefits at virtually every stage of life.  For instance, research indicates that children in families receiving the credits do better in school, are likelier to attend college, and can be expected to earn more as adults.

    Numerous studies show that working-family tax credits boost work effort.  The EITC expansions of the 1990s contributed as much to the subsequent increases in work among single mothers and female heads of households as the welfare changes of that period, extensive research has found.  Women who benefited from those EITC expansions also experienced higher wage growth in subsequent years than otherwise-similar women who didn’t benefit.  And, by boosting the employment and earnings of working-age...

    The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit (CTC), which go to millions of low- and moderate-income working families each year, provide work, income, educational, and health benefits to its recipients and their children, a substantial body of research shows.  In addition, recent ground-breaking research suggests the income from these credits leads to benefits at virtually every stage of life.  For instance, research indicates that children in families receiving the credits do better in school, are likelier to attend college, and can be expected to earn more as adults.

    Numerous studies show that working-family tax credits boost work effort.  The EITC expansions of the 1990s contributed as much to the subsequent increases in work among single mothers and female heads of households as the welfare changes of that period, extensive research has found.  Women who benefited from those EITC expansions also experienced higher wage growth in subsequent years than otherwise-similar women who didn’t benefit.  And, by boosting the employment and earnings of working-age women, the EITC boosts the size of the Social Security retirement benefits they ultimately will receive.  (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Dorn, Stan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Affordable Care Act or ACA) established or expanded health insurance affordability programs (IAPs) that the Congressional Budget Office expects to cover an estimated 29 million people by 2016.1 The ACA also changed longstanding approaches to determining eligibility for benefits, placing a new emphasis on using electronic data (including data from other need-based programs) to qualify consumers for assistance, whenever possible. Enacted against a background of growing public- and private-sector interest in integrating enrollment, retention, and eligibility determination for health and human services programs, the Affordable Care Act included provisions specifically calling for an expansion of such efforts, using 21st-century information technology (IT) to improve consumer experience and streamline enrollment while lowering administrative costs and protecting program integrity. In view of these developments, the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (ASPE) commissioned the...

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Affordable Care Act or ACA) established or expanded health insurance affordability programs (IAPs) that the Congressional Budget Office expects to cover an estimated 29 million people by 2016.1 The ACA also changed longstanding approaches to determining eligibility for benefits, placing a new emphasis on using electronic data (including data from other need-based programs) to qualify consumers for assistance, whenever possible. Enacted against a background of growing public- and private-sector interest in integrating enrollment, retention, and eligibility determination for health and human services programs, the Affordable Care Act included provisions specifically calling for an expansion of such efforts, using 21st-century information technology (IT) to improve consumer experience and streamline enrollment while lowering administrative costs and protecting program integrity. In view of these developments, the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (ASPE) commissioned the Urban Institute to develop a series of papers exploring integration efforts to date and analyzing available options under the ACA. This final report describes the project’s key findings. (author abstract)

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