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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Smith, Richard
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Although the Federal government is responsible for immigration policy, immigrant integration into the workforce and community happens through the work of local governments and non-governmental organizations. Recent scholarship has proposed that urban spatial structure influences whether local governments implement policy to incorporate immigrants which in turn shapes the context of reception. Specifically, some have argued that a bifurcated population (e.g., about half Hispanic and half Anglo), would be more likely to have immigrant friendly policy outcomes for immigrants than a multiethnic population (i.e., a mix of ethnicities and racialized populations but no majority), which in turn would be more likely to have immigrant friendly outcomes than a homogeneously Anglo population. However, the state of the literature is generally limited examine a small set of cases in depth, or to look at specific immigrant friendly or anti-immigrant ordinances as policy outcomes. This question is important for intergovernmental relationships (e.g., Federal requirements to support those with...

    Although the Federal government is responsible for immigration policy, immigrant integration into the workforce and community happens through the work of local governments and non-governmental organizations. Recent scholarship has proposed that urban spatial structure influences whether local governments implement policy to incorporate immigrants which in turn shapes the context of reception. Specifically, some have argued that a bifurcated population (e.g., about half Hispanic and half Anglo), would be more likely to have immigrant friendly policy outcomes for immigrants than a multiethnic population (i.e., a mix of ethnicities and racialized populations but no majority), which in turn would be more likely to have immigrant friendly outcomes than a homogeneously Anglo population. However, the state of the literature is generally limited examine a small set of cases in depth, or to look at specific immigrant friendly or anti-immigrant ordinances as policy outcomes. This question is important for intergovernmental relationships (e.g., Federal requirements to support those with Limited English Proficiency) as well as community engagement. In order to build evidence to inform decision making, I conduct content analysis of annual reports from local governments (n=127) that participated in place-based community development initiatives submitted to the US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development from 1996 – 2008 to provide insight into this proposed relationship. First, I categorize these local governments as including immigrant-related projects or programs. Second, I categorize the neighborhoods designated within the local governments by type of spatial structure (i.e., homogenous, bifurcated, multiethnic) using census data for the designated areas. Then I test associations between having immigrant-related projects or programs and the designated neighborhoods’ spatial structures and population characteristics. I find that designated neighborhoods with increasing immigrant populations, Hispanic bifurcation, or homogeneously Hispanic were associated with local governments developing immigrant-related projects and programs. Homogeneously Hispanic and bifurcated Hispanic places had higher odds of immigrant friendly policy outcomes than multiethnic places. There were no statistically significant difference between multiethnic places and bifurcated Black/White, or homogeneously Black or White places. While this research is not generalizable outside the study population, it is consistent with the theory that bifurcated places are more likely to have immigrant-friendly policy outcomes. This research is also consistent with theory in that multiethnic places may not successfully form coalitions for change. In these instances, it may rest on the action of local government civil servants to respond to population changes. Implications for research, policy, and performance management dashboards are discussed. For example, the American Community Survey has annual updates of population data that could be used to visualize urban spatial structure against self-reported English language attainment to inform local decision making regarding immigrant integration. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Henry, Meghan; Watt, Rian; Rosenthal, Lily; Shivji, Azim
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report outlines the key findings of the 2017 Point-In-Time (PIT) count and Housing Inventory Count (HIC) conducted in January 2017. Specifically, this report provides 2017 national, state, and CoC-level PIT and HIC estimates of homelessness, as well as estimates of chronically homeless persons, homeless veterans, and homeless children and youth. (Author summary)

    This report outlines the key findings of the 2017 Point-In-Time (PIT) count and Housing Inventory Count (HIC) conducted in January 2017. Specifically, this report provides 2017 national, state, and CoC-level PIT and HIC estimates of homelessness, as well as estimates of chronically homeless persons, homeless veterans, and homeless children and youth. (Author summary)

  • Individual Author: Hernandez, Diana; Jiang, Yang; Carrion, Daniel; Phillips, Douglas; Aratani, Yumiko
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    The costs for rent and utilities account for the largest share of living expenses, yet these two critical dimensions of material hardship have seldom been examined concurrently in population based studies. This paper employs multivariate statistical analysis using American Community Survey data to demonstrate the relative risk ratio of low-income renter-occupied households with children experiencing “rent burden,” “energy insecurity,” or a “double burden” as opposed to no burden. Findings suggest that low-income households are more likely to experience these economic hardships in general but that specific groups are disproportionately burdened in different ways. For instance, whereas immigrants are more likely to experience rental burden, they are less likely to experience energy insecurity and are also spared from the double burden. In contrast, native-born African Americans are more likely than all other groups to experience the double burden. These results may be driven by the housing stock available to certain groups due to racial residential segregation, decisions regarding...

    The costs for rent and utilities account for the largest share of living expenses, yet these two critical dimensions of material hardship have seldom been examined concurrently in population based studies. This paper employs multivariate statistical analysis using American Community Survey data to demonstrate the relative risk ratio of low-income renter-occupied households with children experiencing “rent burden,” “energy insecurity,” or a “double burden” as opposed to no burden. Findings suggest that low-income households are more likely to experience these economic hardships in general but that specific groups are disproportionately burdened in different ways. For instance, whereas immigrants are more likely to experience rental burden, they are less likely to experience energy insecurity and are also spared from the double burden. In contrast, native-born African Americans are more likely than all other groups to experience the double burden. These results may be driven by the housing stock available to certain groups due to racial residential segregation, decisions regarding the quality of housing low-income householders are able to afford, as well as home country values, such as modest living and energy conservation practices, among immigrant families. This paper also points to important policy gaps in safety net benefits related to housing and energy targeting low-income households. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nguyen, Mai Thi; Salvesen, David
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Problem, research strategy, and findings: Immigrants suffer disproportionately from disasters because they have limited capacity to prepare for, respond to, or recover from a disaster. Unfortunately, planners and emergency managers are often inadequately trained or educated about the unique sociocultural needs and assets among immigrant groups. Hurricane Katrina exposed challenges to long-term recovery among Southeast Asian immigrants in Bayou La Batre (AL). We employ qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews, focus groups with immigrants, and site visits, to better understand the barriers to disaster recovery and to inform local, state, federal, and nongovernmental agencies on how to better prepare disaster plans that would improve disaster recovery for multiethnic, multicultural, immigrant populations. We find four significant categories of sociocultural barriers to disaster recovery for Southeast Asian immigrants in Bayou La Batre: 1) language, literacy, and communication; 2) cultural differences in help-seeking; 3) inability to navigate the...

    Problem, research strategy, and findings: Immigrants suffer disproportionately from disasters because they have limited capacity to prepare for, respond to, or recover from a disaster. Unfortunately, planners and emergency managers are often inadequately trained or educated about the unique sociocultural needs and assets among immigrant groups. Hurricane Katrina exposed challenges to long-term recovery among Southeast Asian immigrants in Bayou La Batre (AL). We employ qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews, focus groups with immigrants, and site visits, to better understand the barriers to disaster recovery and to inform local, state, federal, and nongovernmental agencies on how to better prepare disaster plans that would improve disaster recovery for multiethnic, multicultural, immigrant populations. We find four significant categories of sociocultural barriers to disaster recovery for Southeast Asian immigrants in Bayou La Batre: 1) language, literacy, and communication; 2) cultural differences in help-seeking; 3) inability to navigate the disaster recovery bureaucracy; and 4) and lack of leadership. Despite these barriers to recovery, immigrant groups can also teach us about resiliency in the face of disaster. The levels of trust, cooperation, and collaboration within the ethnic immigrant community help to buffer the damaging effects during the response and recovery period. Takeaway for practice: Our study reveals that cultural competency among staff members engaged in preparedness, response, and recovery is essential for an effective disaster recovery process. Furthermore, engaging immigrant groups in long-term recovery requires trust and relationship building prior to a disaster. In doing so, more culturally appropriate and effective disaster recovery plans can be developed. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Andersson, Fredrik; Burgess, Simon; Lane, Julia
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    This paper examines the effect of where immigrants live on their labor market outcomes. We provide robust evidence that both the number and the labor market activity of immigrants’ neighbors affect their employment. In particular, we demonstrate that immigrants are much more likely to be employed in the same firm as their geographic neighbors than are other immigrants.(author abstract)

    This paper examines the effect of where immigrants live on their labor market outcomes. We provide robust evidence that both the number and the labor market activity of immigrants’ neighbors affect their employment. In particular, we demonstrate that immigrants are much more likely to be employed in the same firm as their geographic neighbors than are other immigrants.(author abstract)

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