Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Needels, Karen; Nicholson, Walter; Lee, Joanne; Hock, Heinrich
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Great Recession and the time period following it were characterized by the longest average unemployment durations seen since World War II. To support unemployed workers, supplemental Unemployment Compensation (UC) legislation was passed, and, in conjunction with benefits available during non-recessionary times, offered up to 99 weeks of UC benefits to eligible recipients in some states. This represented the longest potential duration of benefits in the history of the UC system. This study examines the extent to which recipients collected all of the benefits to which they were entitled ("exhausting" their benefits) and assesses the outcomes experienced by those who exhausted their entitlements relative to (1) recipients who did not exhaust all of the benefits to which they were entitled and (2) UC non-recipients.

    The analyses used survey and administrative data from 10 states on UC recipients who filed claims from January 2008 through September 2009, as well as data from the Displaced Worker Supplement to the Current Population Survey. Several important...

    The Great Recession and the time period following it were characterized by the longest average unemployment durations seen since World War II. To support unemployed workers, supplemental Unemployment Compensation (UC) legislation was passed, and, in conjunction with benefits available during non-recessionary times, offered up to 99 weeks of UC benefits to eligible recipients in some states. This represented the longest potential duration of benefits in the history of the UC system. This study examines the extent to which recipients collected all of the benefits to which they were entitled ("exhausting" their benefits) and assesses the outcomes experienced by those who exhausted their entitlements relative to (1) recipients who did not exhaust all of the benefits to which they were entitled and (2) UC non-recipients.

    The analyses used survey and administrative data from 10 states on UC recipients who filed claims from January 2008 through September 2009, as well as data from the Displaced Worker Supplement to the Current Population Survey. Several important findings are noted. Twenty-six percent of recipients—recipients who collected benefits from only one claim during a three-year period—exhausted all of the UC benefits to which they were entitled. Overall, these exhaustees collected an average of 87 weeks of benefits compared to 28 weeks of benefits for non-exhaustees. Four to six years after their initial claims, and compared to non-exhaustees, exhaustees were less likely to be employed and more likely to be out of the labor force.

    They also experienced greater losses in household income and had higher rates of participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Social Security retirement, and disability-related income support programs. Relative to recipients with long jobless spells, non-recipients with long jobless spells were less likely to become reemployed in the subsequent few years following their layoff and had lower household incomes. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Manno, Michelle S.; Yang, Edith; Bangser, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Educational attainment and early work experience provide a crucial foundation for future success. However, many young adults are disconnected from both school and the job market. Neglecting these young people can exact a heavy toll on not only the individuals but also society as a whole, for example, through lost productivity and tax contributions, increased dependence on public assistance, and higher rates of criminal activity.

    Project Rise served 18- to 24-year-olds who lacked a high school diploma or the equivalent and had been out of school, out of work, and not in any type of education or training program for at least six months. After enrolling as part of a group (or cohort) of 25 to 30 young people, Project Rise participants were to engage in a 12-month sequence of activities centered on case management, classroom education focused mostly on preparation for a high school equivalency certificate, and a paid part-time internship that was conditional on adequate attendance in the educational component. After the internship, participants were expected to enter...

    Educational attainment and early work experience provide a crucial foundation for future success. However, many young adults are disconnected from both school and the job market. Neglecting these young people can exact a heavy toll on not only the individuals but also society as a whole, for example, through lost productivity and tax contributions, increased dependence on public assistance, and higher rates of criminal activity.

    Project Rise served 18- to 24-year-olds who lacked a high school diploma or the equivalent and had been out of school, out of work, and not in any type of education or training program for at least six months. After enrolling as part of a group (or cohort) of 25 to 30 young people, Project Rise participants were to engage in a 12-month sequence of activities centered on case management, classroom education focused mostly on preparation for a high school equivalency certificate, and a paid part-time internship that was conditional on adequate attendance in the educational component. After the internship, participants were expected to enter unsubsidized employment, postsecondary education, or both. The program was operated by three organizations in New York City; one in Newark, New Jersey; and one in Kansas City, Missouri.

    The Project Rise program operations and evaluation were funded through the federal Social Innovation Fund (SIF), a public-private partnership administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City and the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity led this SIF project in collaboration with MDRC. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mabli, James; Ferrerosa, Carolina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The central objective of this study is to examine the relationship between SNAP caseloads and the economy from 2000 to 2008. Three specific goals are to:

    • Examine the relationship between SNAP caseloads and the unemployment rate and selected policy factors from 2000 to 2008
    • Characterize the relationship between SNAP caseloads and a set of five alternative measures of labor underutilization from 2000 to 2008, including those that measure discouraged and underemployed workers
    • Determine how these relationships differ by characteristics of participant households including household composition and income

    Although the focus is on economic measures, all analyses account for changes in a small set of program policies that prior studies have consistently shown to be correlated with SNAP caseloads. Using a combination of state administrative data and Current Population Survey (CPS) data, we examine factors affecting participation in SNAP from 2000 to 2008, expanding upon the existing research by extending the period of research two years through...

    The central objective of this study is to examine the relationship between SNAP caseloads and the economy from 2000 to 2008. Three specific goals are to:

    • Examine the relationship between SNAP caseloads and the unemployment rate and selected policy factors from 2000 to 2008
    • Characterize the relationship between SNAP caseloads and a set of five alternative measures of labor underutilization from 2000 to 2008, including those that measure discouraged and underemployed workers
    • Determine how these relationships differ by characteristics of participant households including household composition and income

    Although the focus is on economic measures, all analyses account for changes in a small set of program policies that prior studies have consistently shown to be correlated with SNAP caseloads. Using a combination of state administrative data and Current Population Survey (CPS) data, we examine factors affecting participation in SNAP from 2000 to 2008, expanding upon the existing research by extending the period of research two years through 2008. Policymakers will be able to use the results of this research to guide the development of effective strategies for increasing program participation, as well as to better understand how changes in the economy contribute to caseload changes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mabli, James; Martin, Emily S.; Castner, Laura
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    This study uses a unique combination of State panel data and qualitative interviews to examine the economic and policy factors associated with the sharp increase in the number of Food Stamp Program (FSP) participants between 2000 and 2006. This period is particularly interesting because the rise in participation between 2003 and 2006 occurred while the national economy was improving. Higher numbers of participants were associated with higher State unemployment rates and lower State labor force participation rates and minimum wages. The introduction of FSP policies designed to expand eligibility and ease reporting also increased the number of participants. In addition, program outreach efforts were associated with higher caseloads in times of low unemployment. Interviews with State FSP administrators and staff at community-based organizations reinforce the quantitative findings and point to declining local economic conditions and high-quality program outreach as the main sources of caseload growth. The Food Stamp Program was renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (...

    This study uses a unique combination of State panel data and qualitative interviews to examine the economic and policy factors associated with the sharp increase in the number of Food Stamp Program (FSP) participants between 2000 and 2006. This period is particularly interesting because the rise in participation between 2003 and 2006 occurred while the national economy was improving. Higher numbers of participants were associated with higher State unemployment rates and lower State labor force participation rates and minimum wages. The introduction of FSP policies designed to expand eligibility and ease reporting also increased the number of participants. In addition, program outreach efforts were associated with higher caseloads in times of low unemployment. Interviews with State FSP administrators and staff at community-based organizations reinforce the quantitative findings and point to declining local economic conditions and high-quality program outreach as the main sources of caseload growth. The Food Stamp Program was renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in October 2008. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary; Fishman, Michael E.; Gardiner, Karen N.; Barnow, Burt; Trutko, Jon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The Department of Labor (DOL) funded this study to explore the relationship between nonmonetary eligibility policies and practices and program outcomes, such as recipiency and benefit duration. This report provides an examination of the factors that appear to affect program outcomes in eight states: Four “high recipiency” states (Delaware, Maine, Pennsylvania, Washington) and four “low recipiency” ones (Arizona, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah). We explored policies and practices specific to separations, non-separations, and appeals of separation and non-separation decisions using information collected from documents supplied by the states, as well as from interviews conducted during site visits to each of the eight states. We examined the information obtained for this study within the context of existing research on factors that affect UI recipiency and benefit duration. (Edited author executive summary)

     

    The Department of Labor (DOL) funded this study to explore the relationship between nonmonetary eligibility policies and practices and program outcomes, such as recipiency and benefit duration. This report provides an examination of the factors that appear to affect program outcomes in eight states: Four “high recipiency” states (Delaware, Maine, Pennsylvania, Washington) and four “low recipiency” ones (Arizona, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah). We explored policies and practices specific to separations, non-separations, and appeals of separation and non-separation decisions using information collected from documents supplied by the states, as well as from interviews conducted during site visits to each of the eight states. We examined the information obtained for this study within the context of existing research on factors that affect UI recipiency and benefit duration. (Edited author executive summary)

     

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2001 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations