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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Maher, Will
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    When many Americans think of poverty, decaying urban areas and neglected rural pockets come to mind. However, in the last 20 years, the geography of American poverty has shifted, with an increasing number of America’s poor people now living in suburbs. (Author abstract)

    When many Americans think of poverty, decaying urban areas and neglected rural pockets come to mind. However, in the last 20 years, the geography of American poverty has shifted, with an increasing number of America’s poor people now living in suburbs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Smeeding, Timothy M.; Isaacs, Julia B.; Thornton, Katherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    To provide a more nuanced picture of economic hardship in Wisconsin, the authors employ three different measures for estimating poverty in the state from 2008 through 2012, as shown in Figure 1. The three measures are: a measure based on market (private) income only; the Census Bureau’s official poverty measure, which considers only pre-tax but post-benefit cash income; and the Wisconsin Poverty Measure (WPM), a measure that researchers at the Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) have developed to better reflect a comprehensive set of needs and resources in Wisconsin. (author introduction)

    To provide a more nuanced picture of economic hardship in Wisconsin, the authors employ three different measures for estimating poverty in the state from 2008 through 2012, as shown in Figure 1. The three measures are: a measure based on market (private) income only; the Census Bureau’s official poverty measure, which considers only pre-tax but post-benefit cash income; and the Wisconsin Poverty Measure (WPM), a measure that researchers at the Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) have developed to better reflect a comprehensive set of needs and resources in Wisconsin. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Gould-Werth, Alix; Burgard, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    From December 2007 through June 2009, the United States experienced its most severe recession since the Great Depression. Though the National Bureau of Economic Research officially declared the end of the recession in June of 2009, high rates of unemployment have persisted into 2012. Michigan is among the states hit hardest by the recession, especially the Detroit Metropolitan area, which has long been the center of the automobile industry.

    The Great Recession and its aftermath have impacted the employment and incomes of a wide swath of residents. Black and non-black, male and female, blue-collar and white-collar Michiganders experienced layoffs, furloughs, wage cuts and other employment and economic shocks. As is the case nationally, employment problems were concentrated among workers who are less-educated, blue-collar and African American.

    This report examines the employment problems of three groups at the time of the first survey: those who were employed, those who were unemployed; and those who were not in the labor force. (author abstract)

    From December 2007 through June 2009, the United States experienced its most severe recession since the Great Depression. Though the National Bureau of Economic Research officially declared the end of the recession in June of 2009, high rates of unemployment have persisted into 2012. Michigan is among the states hit hardest by the recession, especially the Detroit Metropolitan area, which has long been the center of the automobile industry.

    The Great Recession and its aftermath have impacted the employment and incomes of a wide swath of residents. Black and non-black, male and female, blue-collar and white-collar Michiganders experienced layoffs, furloughs, wage cuts and other employment and economic shocks. As is the case nationally, employment problems were concentrated among workers who are less-educated, blue-collar and African American.

    This report examines the employment problems of three groups at the time of the first survey: those who were employed, those who were unemployed; and those who were not in the labor force. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Winship, Scott
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Understanding trends in economic instability is vital if economic and social policies aimed at mitigating economic risk are to be effective. Despite the popular perception that economic instability has been rising— and a research literature that often support this perception—recent studies have cast doubt on the conventional wisdom. At the same time, previous research that has used disparate measures, datasets, and methodological choices provides little guidance to account for different findings across studies. This report addresses this problem by estimating comparable trends in economic instability across three of the most-used household surveys—the SIPP, CPS, and PSID. I find that comparing estimates depends crucially on how imputed income components are addressed. The SIPP indicates that economic instability has not changed much over 40 years. The PSID results mirror those of the SIPP for male and female earnings but show a small increase in the instability of household incomes. The CPS tends to show increases in instability, which become modest after excluding incomes...

    Understanding trends in economic instability is vital if economic and social policies aimed at mitigating economic risk are to be effective. Despite the popular perception that economic instability has been rising— and a research literature that often support this perception—recent studies have cast doubt on the conventional wisdom. At the same time, previous research that has used disparate measures, datasets, and methodological choices provides little guidance to account for different findings across studies. This report addresses this problem by estimating comparable trends in economic instability across three of the most-used household surveys—the SIPP, CPS, and PSID. I find that comparing estimates depends crucially on how imputed income components are addressed. The SIPP indicates that economic instability has not changed much over 40 years. The PSID results mirror those of the SIPP for male and female earnings but show a small increase in the instability of household incomes. The CPS tends to show increases in instability, which become modest after excluding incomes dominated by imputation. However, features of the SIPP—along with the results of my analyses—give reason to believe the SIPP estimates are the most valid of the three surveys. The results call into question the concept of a "Great Risk Shift" in general and the validity of the recently developed Rockefeller Economic Security Index in particular. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blank, Rebecca; Kovak, Brian
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    Over the past 15 years, the United States has increased the incentives for low-income adults to work and reduced the availability and generosity of benefits for non-working (and non-disabled) individuals. These policy changes have helped generate substantial increases in work and earnings, particularly among low-income, single-mother families, but they have also made assistance less available to those who find themselves out of work and destitute. This article looks at the extent to which economic need has changed following the reforms of the 1990s. The evidence suggests that although the average single mother increased her income significantly, with increased earnings more than offsetting declining welfare benefits, a growing group of single mothers report that they are not working and do not receive public assistance benefits. We refer to these women and their families as "disconnected." This group is very poor, and the majority live without other adults in their household. Given rising numbers of disconnected single mothers, we believe it is important to assess...

    Over the past 15 years, the United States has increased the incentives for low-income adults to work and reduced the availability and generosity of benefits for non-working (and non-disabled) individuals. These policy changes have helped generate substantial increases in work and earnings, particularly among low-income, single-mother families, but they have also made assistance less available to those who find themselves out of work and destitute. This article looks at the extent to which economic need has changed following the reforms of the 1990s. The evidence suggests that although the average single mother increased her income significantly, with increased earnings more than offsetting declining welfare benefits, a growing group of single mothers report that they are not working and do not receive public assistance benefits. We refer to these women and their families as "disconnected." This group is very poor, and the majority live without other adults in their household. Given rising numbers of disconnected single mothers, we believe it is important to assess possible changes in the safety net that might provide greater support to them and to their children. (author abstract)