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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Gutierrez, Florencia; Speer, Laura; Boughamer, Beau; Fox, Ryan; Hamilton, Lisa; Hodgins, John; Laracy, Michael; West, Norris; Cauthen, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. In this year’s report, New Hampshire ranked first among states for overall child well-being, moving up one from 2016. Massachusetts and Vermont filled out the top three. Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi were the three lowest-ranked states. (Author abstract)

    The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. In this year’s report, New Hampshire ranked first among states for overall child well-being, moving up one from 2016. Massachusetts and Vermont filled out the top three. Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi were the three lowest-ranked states. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Smith, Kristin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Using the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this brief examines changes in father-provided child care among married fathers with an employed wife. Author Kristin Smith reports that the share of married fathers providing care to their children under age 15 while their mother worked rose from 27 percent in 2005 to 31 percent in 2011. The rise in father-provided child care was driven primarily by the rise in child care provided by black and Hispanic fathers. Between 2005 and 2011, the shares of rural and urban married fathers providing child care began to diverge. In 2005, rural and urban married fathers were equally likely to provide care to their children. By 2011, the share of urban married fathers providing care had risen by 4 percentage points, while rural fathers' care provision remained the same. The results presented in this brief demonstrate that the share of married fathers who provide care to their children increased during the Great Recession. Married-couple families adapted to husbands' job loss by increasing their reliance on fathers as caregivers. (author...

    Using the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this brief examines changes in father-provided child care among married fathers with an employed wife. Author Kristin Smith reports that the share of married fathers providing care to their children under age 15 while their mother worked rose from 27 percent in 2005 to 31 percent in 2011. The rise in father-provided child care was driven primarily by the rise in child care provided by black and Hispanic fathers. Between 2005 and 2011, the shares of rural and urban married fathers providing child care began to diverge. In 2005, rural and urban married fathers were equally likely to provide care to their children. By 2011, the share of urban married fathers providing care had risen by 4 percentage points, while rural fathers' care provision remained the same. The results presented in this brief demonstrate that the share of married fathers who provide care to their children increased during the Great Recession. Married-couple families adapted to husbands' job loss by increasing their reliance on fathers as caregivers. (author abstract)

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